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Common problem, varying strategies

Multinational corporations are not merely the problem in environmental concerns, but could also be part of the solution. The oil industry and climate change provide the clearest example of how the two are linked; what is less well known is how the industry is responding to these concerns. This book presents a detailed study of the climate strategies of ExxonMobil, Shell and Statoil. Using an analytical approach, the chapters explain variations at three decision-making levels: within the companies themselves, in the national home-bases of the companies and at an international level. The analysis generates policy-relevant knowledge about whether and how corporate resistance to a viable climate policy can be overcome. The analytical approach developed by this book is also applicable to other areas of environmental degradation where multinational corporations play a central role.

Open Access (free)

effect’ (Gleckman, 1995). Large oil companies influence domestic climate policy, affect the positions of states in international climate negotiations, and constitute critical target groups when policies are to be implemented. Against this backdrop, the identification of conditions determining the climate strategies chosen by the oil industry will provide knowledge about whether and how corporate resistance to a viable climate policy can be overcome. There are essentially two main views regarding the extent to which large multinational corporations are controllable or

in Climate change and the oil industry
Open Access (free)

stimulated and corporate resistance overcome. To address the research questions and move towards a better understanding of factors explaining changes and differences in corporate climate strategies, we have chosen to focus on three major oil companies in this study: ExxonMobil, the Shell Group and Statoil. Crudely put, these companies share the same core aim of selling as much oil and gas as possible at the highest possible price and the lowest possible cost within the same global market. The business opportunities and challenges offered by regulatory measures to curb GHG

in Climate change and the oil industry
Open Access (free)

multinational oil companies represent important target groups for mitigating climate change, identifying such conditions will provide knowledge of whether and how corporate resistance to climate policy can be overcome. Of particular importance is the extent to which varying climate strategies are the result of companyspecific factors, or whether they are located in the political context at national or international levels. Strong empirical support in the former case will point in the direction of corporations operating beyond the reach of climate policy-makers, while the

in Climate change and the oil industry