Open Access (free)
Food and Identity in His Life and Fiction
Emily Na

This article traces how the queer Black writer James Baldwin’s transnational palate and experiences influenced the ways he wrote about Black domestic spaces in the late twentieth century. In the 1960s and 1970s, while Black feminist cooks and writers like Edna Lewis, Jessica B. Harris, and Vertamae Smart-Grosvenor developed new theories of soul food in relation to the Black American community and broader American cuisine, Baldwin incorporated these philosophies and transnational tastes into his lifestyle and works. He traveled and worked around Europe, settling in places like Paris, Istanbul, and Saint-Paul de Vence for years at a time. In Saint-Paul de Vence, where he spent his last years, he set up his own welcome table, at which he hosted internationally renowned guests and shared his love of cuisine. Inevitably, Baldwin’s passion for cooking and hosting meals became a large, though scholarly neglected, component of his novels and essays. In his novels Another Country, which he finished in Istanbul and published in 1962, and Just Above My Head, which he finished in Saint-Paul de Vence and published in 1979, Baldwin’s depictions of food and Black kitchens take a queer turn. Instead of lingering on traditional Black family structures, these texts specifically present new formulations of intimate home life and reimagine relationships between food, kitchens, race, and sex in the late twentieth century.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

resource. Food is inevitably brought within the moral perspective.’ 61 It is because the culture of food is part of the culture of identity that apparent slights to it can be so powerful. As Douglas puts it, ‘Whenever a people are aware of encroachment and danger, dietary rules controlling what goes into the body would serve as a vivid analogy of the corpus of their cultural categories at risk.’ 62 So cuisine is more than a symbol of other identifications, it becomes a parallel or supporting cultivation of distinctive identity

in Cultivating political and public identity
Open Access (free)
Quality and processes of qualification
Mark Harvey, Andrew McMeekin, and Alan Warde

and methodological standpoints, of course, some avenues are opened up, while others are passed by. In this final section, we reflect on some major considerations about quality of food that might constitute significant and unexplored avenues. There are four main avenues, and they are broad: biology and ecology; history and cuisine; cooking and eating; innovation and competition. They join at a roundabout, around which circulate questions concerning the specificity of quality of food. Are the registers to quality in food different from those to quality in music

in Qualities of food
The case of Maghrebi Muslims in France
Florence Bergeaud-Blackler

shops. The particular place of meat in North African cuisine has changed under the influence of other culinary traditions. Finally, Maghrebi men were not included in the production processes as much as they were in their home country. Prior to 1974, Maghrebi immigration was mainly of males and was considered largely temporary. Then, the French Government decided to stop all primary immigration other than family regrouping. As men could not go back to their country without risk of being unable to re-enter France, they preferred to bring their spouses and family and

in Qualities of food
Open Access (free)
Relational reflexivity in the ‘alternative’ food movement
Jonathan Murdoch and Mara Miele

ensuing food scares provoke increased consumer concern about the conditions of food production (Griffiths and Wallace 1998) and, as a consequence, a sizeable and growing minority of consumers turn to alternative food sources. Fernandez-Armesto summarises this trend, at the end of his recent history of food (2001: 250), when he says that an artisanal reaction is already underway. Local revulsion from pressure to accept the products of standardised taste has stimulated revivals of traditional cuisines . . . In prosperous markets the emphasis is shifting from cheapness to

in Qualities of food
Nicola McDonald

, the appetite for more – that makes it more than just a neat MUP_McDonald_07_Ch6 125 11/18/03, 17:02 126 Nicola McDonald piece of propaganda (like the battle between Saracens and Christians staged at Charles V’s Twelfth Night dinner in 1378).7 It is a licence, metaphorically at least, to eat people. According to structuralist anthropologists, food must be not only ‘good to eat’ but ‘good to think’.8 Cuisine, the transformation of raw into cooked, is a language that encodes both the essential ordering (the structure) of a society and its hidden contradictions. Key

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Open Access (free)
The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author: Neil Macmaster

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

The (un)predictability of modern consumption
Jukka Gronow

ethnic cuisine (‘I like Chinese food’ or ‘I only go to real Irish pubs’). The principle of accumulation Based on the idea of accumulating singular similar experiences, this principle leads to a tendency to repetition. What was successful once is probably worth trying again. On the other hand experiences tend to lose value when repeated. The paradox, which concerns also the principle of abstraction, is that the best experiences often come unexpected, as if by chance, walking along the street (‘I always go to my local pub, but something exciting might be happening in the

in Qualities of food
An instituted economic process approach
Mark Harvey

its complementarity with the slave trade. Zuckerman (1999) chose the potato as an instrument for asking a somewhat different question from these studies, namely, how the potato was adopted differentially by national cuisines and class diets from the time it first crossed the Atlantic. Pilcher (1998) has explored how a distinctively mestizo cuisine developed from a cultural and colonial conflict between indigenous maize culture and European wheat culture in Mexico. My own research has adopted the tomato as its favoured empirical probe to analyse the transformations

in Innovation by demand
Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

sectarianism’ because the other passengers couldn't understand it either, whilst assuming that the young revolutionaries could. 49 Distinction could work against existing hierarchies as well as in support of them. Eating British, eating English, but also eating Scottish, eating Welsh, and eating Irish Food is not only one of the principal components of identity, but an apt metaphor for its complex, contingent, and cultivated character. Cuisine is always a combination, mixture, and juxtaposition of ingredients, methods of preparation

in Cultivating political and public identity