Patrick Callaghan and Penny Bee

Quantitative Data Analysis Patrick Callaghan and Penny Bee Chapter overview Quantitative data analysis makes sense of numerical data. We often refer to quantitative data analysis as statistical analysis, and you may see this term used in published research papers. We can use numbers to summarise the experiences or characteristics of a group of participants, for example their average age or the number of symptoms they report. We can also use numbers to look at people’s behaviours, experiences and views, for example the number of people using mental health

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Helen Brooks, Penny Bee and Anne Rogers

Chapter 8: Introduction to Qualitative Data Analysis Helen Brooks, Penny Bee and Anne Rogers Chapter overview Qualitative data includes a range of textual (e.g. transcripts of interviews and focus groups) and visual (photographic and video) data. During qualitative analysis researchers make sense of this data gathered from research. Analysing the data by looking for common themes (known as thematic analysis) is one of the most common ways in which to do this and involves examining and recording patterns within the data relating to a specific research question

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Keith Krause

In discussions of conflict, war and political violence, dead bodies count. Although the politics and practices associated with the collection of violent-death data are seldom subject to critical examination, they are crucial to how scholars and practitioners think about how and why conflict and violence erupt. Knowledge about conflict deaths – the who, what, where, when, why and how – is a form of expertise, created, disseminated and used by different agents. This article highlights the ways in which body counts are deployed as social facts and forms of knowledge that are used to shape and influence policies and practices associated with armed conflict. It traces the way in which conflict-death data emerged, and then examines critically some of the practices and assumptions of data collection to shed light on how claims to expertise are enacted and on how the public arena connects (or not) with scholarly conflict expertise.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Building High-tech Castles in the Air?
Anisa Jabeen Nasir Jafar

and beneficial to the process either of data collection or collation, and would not put the field hospital at risk of data loss for any number of reasons. When building solutions, we must be mindful of the cost at each stage and what is required to support any electronic system. If the benefits are outweighed by the burdens, the system will not be adopted: quite simply, healthcare professionals will adopt the approach which works best for them, and adoption would potentially be a wasted

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Geoffrey K. Roberts and Patricia Hogwood

This sectioncontains a set of political data relating to the political system of each country in Western Europe.

in The politics today companion to West European Politics
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

Introduction The much touted technologising of humanitarian space has brought many useful innovations. The use of cell-phones, satellites, drones, social-media platforms, digital cash and biometric technology has changed how things are done, the speed and cost of doing them and from where and by whom they can be done ( Sandvik, 2019 ). A central part of what these technologies accomplish is to generate data ( Burns, 2015 ; Crawford and Finn, 2015 ; Fast, 2017 ; Read et al

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Suhad Daher-Nashif

This article aims to shed light on the post-mortem practices for Palestinian dead bodies when there is suspicion of human rights violations by Israeli military forces. By focusing on the case of Omran Abu Hamdieh from Al-Khalil (Hebron), the article explores the interactions between Palestinian social-institutional agents, Israeli military forces and international medico-legal agents. Drawing on ethnographic and archival data, the article explores how the intersectionality between the various controlling powers is inscribed over the Palestinian dead bodies and structures their death rites. The article claims that inviting foreign medico-legal experts in the Palestinian context could reveal the true death story and the human rights violations, but also reaffirms the sovereignty of the Israeli military forces over the Palestinian dead and lived bodies.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Editors’ Introduction
Tanja R. Müller and Gemma Sou

’s increasing involvement in humanitarian aid, focusing in particular on humanitarian wearables. She demonstrates how such wearables and the data generated by them may turn the relationship between beneficiaries and humanitarian actors on its head, in that beneficiaries provide the goods, not least in the form of marketable data, to humanitarian actors. This raises important ethical concerns and, as Sandvik suggests, requires a considered debate about data colonialism. Two further contributions engage

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

spirit of 1970s direct humanitarian action was fabricated from a deductive process of knowledge formation framed by narratives of history, causation and reciprocity. Reflecting the rise to dominance of a cybernetic episteme, this register has been replaced by a reliance on inductive mathematical data and machine-thinking for sense-making ( Rouvroy, 2012 ). Thinking has been transformed into calculation ( Han, 2013 ). 1 The current dominance within the academy of empiricism and behaviourism reflects this change in world-experience. What is often

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

Linda Leung (2018) Technologies of Refuge and Displacement: Rethinking Digital Divides (Lanham, MA: Lexington Books), hardcover, 141 pages; ISBN: 978-1-14985-0002-9 In her book Technologies of Refuge and Displacement: Rethinking Digital Divides , Linda Leung – a researcher at University of Technology Sydney, Australia – provides a systematic empirical analysis of data collected between 2007 and 2011, which involved more than 100 interviews with individuals from refugee

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs