Open Access (free)
The bodyand counter-revolutionary warfare inapartheid South Africa
Nicky Rousseau

8 Death and dismemberment: the body and counter-revolutionary warfare in apartheid South Africa 1 Nicky Rousseau As resistance intensified in what would turn out to be apartheid’s final decade, security forces in South Africa began covertly to exe­cute opponents extra-judicially, despite a formidable arsenal of security legislation and a state of emergency from 1985 to 1990.2 A noteworthy aspect of these executions is that the modes of killing varied, sometimes along regional lines, or according to the particular security unit involved. Disposal of the bodies

in Destruction and human remains
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human remains from the siege of Turin, 1706 Mercinelli Martina martina.mercinelli@gmail.com Smith Martin J. mjsmith@bournemouth.ac.uk 10 2019 12 11 2019 5 5 2 2 34 34 55 55 4 10.7227/HRV.5.2.4 ‘I am here and I am here to stay’: the death and burial of soldiers with cholera during the

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5 5 1 1 3 3 17 17 2 10.7227/HRV.5.1.2 The clandestine cemetery Burying the victims of Europe’s border in a Tunisian coastal town Zagaria Valentina v.zagaria@lse.ac.uk April 2019 5 5 1 1 18 18 37 37 3 10.7227/HRV.5.1.3 Bodies in the tip Deaths and politicised deaths in Buenos Aires’s refuse Perelman Mariano D. mdperelman

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John Fibiger Linda Smith Joan Adler Tal Szöke Anna April 2018 4 4 1 1 3 3 24 24 10.7227/HRV.4.1.2 HRV.4.1.2.xml Pervasive death: Teresa Margolles and the space of the corpse

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.2.4 Forensic excavations and burials in Uruguay, 2004–10 López Mazz Jose October 2016 2 2 2 2 56 56 66 66 10.7227/HRV.2.2.5 Murderous returns: armed violence, suicide and exhumation in the Emberá Katío economy of death (Chocó and Antioquia, Colombia) Losonczy Anne Marie October 2016 2 2 2 2 67 67 83 83 10.7227/HRV.2.2.6 Book Reviews Corron

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handling of bodies at the Drancy camp (1941–44) From legal procedures to collective forgetting Lehr Johanna johannalehr@gmail.com 23 07 2020 04 2020 6 6 1 1 40 40 56 56 4 10.7227/HRV.6.1.4 Evidential remains Dead bodies, evidence and the death march from Buchenwald to Dachau, April–May 1945 Mauriello Christopher E. cmauriello@salemstate.edu 23 07 2020 04 2020 6 6 1 1 57 57 83 83 5 10.7227/HRV.6.1.5 The subject of ashes Millet Kitty S. kmillet1@sfsu.edu 23 07 2020 04 2020 6 6 1 1 84 84 97 97 6 10.7227/HRV.6.1.6 Book Reviews Book Reviews Nistor Adina

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and violent death data Krause Keith April 2017 3 3 1 1 90 90 115 115 10.7227/HRV.3.1.7 Book Reviews Ubelaker Douglas H. Vega Anne Platt Tony Drieu Cloé April 2017 3 3 1 1 116 116 123 123 10.7227/HRV

Benoît Pouget

Based on a study of intersecting French archives (those of the Val de Grâce Hospital, the Service Historique de la Défense and the Archives Diplomatiques), and with the support of numerous printed sources, this article focuses on the handling of the bodies of French soldiers who died of cholera during the Crimean War (1854–56). As a continuation of studies done by historians Luc Capdevila and Danièle Voldman, the aim here is to consider how the diseased corpses of these soldiers reveal both the causes and circumstances of their deaths. Beyond the epidemiological context, these dead bodies shed light on the sanitary conditions and suffering resulting from years of military campaigns. To conclude, the article analyses the material traces left by these dead and the way that the Second Empire used them politically, giving the remains of leaders who died on the front lines of the cholera epidemic a triumphant return to the country and a state funeral.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Antonius C. G. M. Robben

Thousands of people died in Rotterdam during the Second World War in more than 300 German and Allied bombardments. Civil defence measures had been taken before the German invasion of the Netherlands in May 1940 and these efforts were intensified during the country’s occupation as Allied bombers attacked Rotterdam’s port, factories, dry docks and oil terminals. Residential neighbourhoods were also hit through imprecise targeting and by misfired flak grenades. Inadequate air raid shelters and people’s reluctance to enter them caused many casualties. The condition of the corpses and their post-mortem treatment was thus co-constituted by the relationship between the victims and their material circumstances. This article concludes that an understanding of the treatment of the dead after war, genocide and mass violence must pay systematic attention to the materiality of death because the condition, collection and handling of human remains is affected by the material means that impacted on the victims.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)
Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic
Laura Chrisman

chapter4 21/12/04 11:00 am Page 73 4 Journeying to death: Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic has received huge international acclaim.1 Within American studies, anthropology, black studies, Caribbean studies, cultural studies and literary studies the book has been hailed as a major and original contribution.Gilroy takes issue with the national boundaries within which these disciplines operate, arguing that, as the book jacket tells us there is a culture that is not specifically African, American, Caribbean, or British, but all

in Postcolonial contraventions