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Joshua Foa Dienstag in dialogue
Series: Critical Powers

This book engages in a critical encounter with the work of Stanley Cavell on cinema, focusing skeptical attention on the claims made for the contribution of cinema to the ethical character of democratic life. In much of Cavell's writing on film he seeks to show us that the protagonists of the films he terms "remarriage comedies" live a form of perfectionism that he upholds as desirable for contemporary democratic society: moral perfectionism. Films are often viewed on television, and television shows can have "filmlike" qualities. The book addresses the nature of viewing cinematic film as a mode of experience, arguing against Cavell that it is akin to dreaming rather than lived consciousness and, crucially, cannot be shared. It mirrors the celebrated dialogue between Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Jean D'Alembert on theatre. The book articulates the implications of philosophical pessimism for addressing contemporary culture in its relationship to political life. It clarifies how The Americans resembles the remarriage films and can illuminate the issues they raise. The tragedy of remarriage, would be a better instructor of a democratic community, if such a community were prepared to listen. The book suggests that dreaming, both with and without films, is not merely a pleasurable distraction but a valuable pastime for democratic citizens. Finally, it concludes with a robust response from Dienstag to his critics.

Open Access (free)
Inheriting the Task of Creative Democracy
John Narayan

applied it puts a new practical meaning in old ideas. (LW14: 226) Conclusion: Inheriting the Task of Creative Democracy 129 These words taken from his eightieth birthday address mark out both Dewey’s great contribution and challenge as a global philosopher. As this book has tried to show, Dewey’s contribution as a global philosopher centres on the theorization of the link between democracy at home and democracy abroad. The formation of the democratic community at the international level is inherently dependant upon the vitality of the community and the diffusion of

in John Dewey
John Narayan

the ‘global’ context is actively part of our daily discussions: We cannot pick up a daily newspaper in which the word “global” does not remind us of the new situation in which we live physically, 106 John Dewey but without the intellectual, the educational, the moral preparation that might enable us to cope with the problems it thrusts upon us. (LW17: 454) Dewey was adamant that a democratic community was enacted through the conscious creation of signs and symbols, habits of thought, language and action and institutions which ‘ … add the function of

in John Dewey
John Narayan

the democratic method is what Dewey calls ‘social intelligence’. To understand Dewey’s idea of social intelligence, we must first recall Dewey’s ideas of creative democracy and democratic community that we explored in Chapter 1. Creative democracy points towards the perpetual adaption of social institutions, including democratic institutions and practices themselves, as new publics are engendered by social change. This is founded on the ethical commitment of democracy as a way of life to the principle that those who are affected by social institutions should have an

in John Dewey
James Bohman

, since without it others will not form the expectation that their reasons as publicly expressed shaped the course of the debate. Toleration is directed both towards policies that might accommodate a minority view and also towards the minority’s reasons put forward in deliberation. This inclusion of other citizens’ salient reasons, such as they are, is a means toward preserving the public character of communication and the inclusive character of the democratic community of citizens. This brings us to the second feature of communication that is the object of toleration

in The culture of toleration in diverse societies
Open Access (free)
John Narayan

every other on the part of those engaged in combined action. ‘Force’ is not eliminated but is transformed in uses and direction by ideas and sentiments made possible by means and symbols. (LW2: 331) On this basis, Dewey takes the form of community invoked by democracy as a way of life, what we call the democratic community, to be the best means to deal with moral conflict and social problems on both synchronic and diachronic levels. Dewey’s idea of the democratic community does not so much do away with moral conflict, which itself is an impossibility, but looks to

in John Dewey
Open Access (free)
Geoffrey K. Roberts and Patricia Hogwood

Green Party/Déi Gréng–Les Verts H Conservative Party (Norway)/Høyre HB United Basque People’s Party (Spain)/Herri Batasuna IU United Left (Spain)/Izquierda Unida KdS Christian Democratic Community Party (Sweden)/Kristdemokratiska Samhällspartiet KESK Centre Party (Finland)/Suomen Keskusta KFP Conservative People’s Party (Denmark)/Konservative Folkeparti KK National Coalition (Finland)/Kansallinen Kokoomus

in The politics today companion to West European Politics
David Owen

) may vary or that it may be defeated by other legitimate concerns. In the second set of remarks, Bauböck comments: In a stakeholder conception of democratic community, persons with multiple stakes need multiple votes to control each of the governments whose decisions will affect their future as members of several demoi . This applies, on the one hand, to federally nested

in Democratic inclusion
John Narayan

two devastating world wars the movement toward production of more comprehensive social organisation, the very movement that brought national states into being has been widely arrested. (LW15: 209) When taken with Dewey’s conception of democracy in mind, it becomes clear that the forestalling of the emergence of a Great Community was not down to any spatial-temporal limits on the practice of democracy, but rather resulted from what Dewey saw as the arresting of creative democracy and the democratic community at the level of the nation state. The arresting of

in John Dewey
Open Access (free)
Reasonable tolerance
Catriona McKinnon and Dario Castiglione

their treatment as free and equal, is part of a kind of reflexive toleration that pertains to public communication in the deliberative context. In such a context, individuals recognise each other as part of the same democratic community, and they do so both by taking each other’s reasons seriously, but also, and even more crucially, by taking each other’s perspectives fully on board. From a different perspective, Andrew Mason’s discussion of ‘cities’ and ‘communities’ develops a parallel argument on the importance of coming into contact with others. His focus is on

in The culture of toleration in diverse societies