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Nicholas Johnson

with my theatrical direction of Play within the Ethica project in 2012–13. In discussing specific choices made in the context of these performances, my aim is threefold: 1) to expose the practicalities of rehearsing and staging Beckett in digital culture, in a form comprehensible to non-practitioners; 2) to extend the impact of these projects by rigorously documenting their preparation; and 3) to reflect on the affordances of contemporary digital media as such, and how these might alter production and reception of Beckett's works in the future. Multiple past

in Beckett and media
Open Access (free)
Dissent and the machine

Anti-computing explores forgotten histories and contemporary forms of dissent – moments when the imposition of computational technologies, logics, techniques, imaginaries, utopias have been questioned, disputed, or refused. It also asks why these moments tend to be forgotten. What is it about computational capitalism that means we live so much in the present? What has this to do with computational logics and practices themselves?

This book addresses these issues through a critical engagement with media archaeology and medium theory and by way of a series of original studies; exploring Hannah Arendt and early automation anxiety, witnessing and the database, Two Cultures from the inside out, bot fear, singularity and/as science fiction. Finally, it returns to remap long-standing concerns against new forms of dissent, hostility, and automation anxiety, producing a distant reading of contemporary hostility.

At once an acute response to urgent concerns around toxic digital cultures, an accounting with media archaeology as a mode of medium theory, and a series of original and methodologically fluid case studies, this book crosses an interdisciplinary research field including cultural studies, media studies, medium studies, critical theory, literary and science fiction studies, media archaeology, medium theory, cultural history, technology history.

Open Access (free)
Graeme Kirkpatrick

design and use that are increasingly common in digital culture. Feenberg’s project differs markedly from that of earlier critical theories, then, in finding overt political significance in technical practices. To develop critical theory in this direction, Feenberg advances a distinctive concept of hegemony, a close conceptual relative of the idea of reification discussed in Chapter 1 ( Section 2 ). As we saw in the last chapter, the bias of technology is maintained by a sheen of neutrality that ensures it comes to appear necessary while resistance to it seems

in Technical politics
Open Access (free)
Pleasantville and the textuality of media memory
Paul Grainge

culture through the enforcement of property rights (in this case, Ted Turner’s). While the political climate altered very little in the 1990s – copyright protection becoming a defining issue in the neo-liberal media marketplace – attitudes towards digital culture did change. With regard to Hollywood’s own output, Andrew Darley suggests that a new modality of mainstream cinema developed, comprised of

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
From critical theory to technical politics
Graeme Kirkpatrick

that had seemed to be most strongly associated with the dominance of the system. Moreover, the changes to technology associated with the move to digital culture involve alterations not only to the productive or economic dimension of society. The rise of computers and of other digital techniques has changed the way that technology relates to culture and meaning. In effect, it raises the question of whether there is a single continuous meaning to the idea of technology, a definition that transcends such discrepancies and links all of its various instances. Is there

in Technical politics
Open Access (free)
Balazs Rapcsak
and
Mark Nixon

’. In addition to these questions which, as it were, arise from within Beckett's work, there is also a growing understanding among scholars of the general importance of the media-historical contexts in which cultural products are created, interpreted and continue to be made available. In the case of Beckett, knowledge about these contexts is becoming more and more critical as our distance from his work grows and digital culture increasingly becomes our home. As the chapters by Ernst, Murphet, Kittler and Rapcsak indicate, reconstructing the by-now obsolete techno

in Beckett and media
Open Access (free)
Back to the future
Alex Gekker
,
Sam Hind
,
Sybille Lammes
,
Chris Perkins
, and
Clancy Wilmott

practical; attending to the mechanisms and affordances of how stitching might occur for  example. But changing times also demand more conceptual innovation, such as consideration of how epistemology and formal structures of knowledge impact researching temporalities of digital mapping. The theories and methodologies that emerged through these very different interventions can help us to refine and extend our understanding of temporality in relation to digital mapping and digital culture in general. It is about time, because, as the contributions of this book show, digital

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Hannah Jones
,
Yasmin Gunaratnam
,
Gargi Bhattacharyya
,
William Davies
,
Sukhwant Dhaliwal
,
Emma Jackson
, and
Roiyah Saltus

, A. ( 2012 ) ‘ Introduction: Affective fabrics of digital cultures ’, in A. Karatzogiani and A. Kuntsman (eds), Digital Cultures and the Politics of Emotion , Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan , pp. 1–17 . La Barbera , M.C. (ed.) ( 2013 ) Identity and Migration in Europe: Multidisciplinary Perspectives , Cham : Springer

in Go home?
A distant reading of the contemporary moment
Caroline Bassett

particularly clear line. Psychologist Sherry Turkle's book Reclaiming Conversation (2016) is notable for revisionism; Turkle sees it as marking a turn away from the more positive viewpoint she held in her early engagements with digital culture – via Life on the Screen and The Second Self (2005), although a newly revised edition of the latter is an Amazon suggestion. Turkle now argues that a more critical engagement with the digital is needed. We were young, she says, and so was the internet, but now we need to grow up

in Anti-computing
Open Access (free)
Postfeminist genealogies in millennial culture
Stéphanie Genz

transnational phenomenon, travelling across borders to become meaningful and localized in various, non-Western settings. As Dosekun has observed, ‘post-feminism is readily transnationalized, that is rendered transnational culture, because it is a fundamentally mediated and commodified discourse and set of material practices’. 36 Moreover, the term has gained prominence outside representational and media culture and is now discussed in relation to education, health, digital culture and work, to name but a few current sites of

in Post-everything