Open Access (free)
Cora Kaplan

The distinguished critic Professor Cheryl A. Wall (1948–2020) was the Board of Governors Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. Her path-breaking scholarship in two highly influential monographs, Women of the Harlem Renaissance (1995) and Worrying the Line: Black Women Writers, Lineage, and Literary Tradition (2005), helped to ensure that twentieth-century Black women writers were recognized and valued for their power, genius, and complexity. Her most recent book, On Freedom and the Will to Adorn: The Art of the African American Essay (2018), places the essay form at the center of African American literary achievement. Throughout her long career she supported and enabled Black students, and championed racial diversity and gender equality at every level of the university. An Associate Editor of James Baldwin Review, she was the most generous and astute of readers, as well as a wise editor. In this memorial section, fifteen colleagues, former students, and interlocutors share their remembrances and honor her legacy.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
Phoebe Shambaugh

critical reflections which contribute to the broader debates. While we have found significant value in themed and curated special issues, general issues and sections remain key fora for debate and raising new topics, themes and analyses. This relies on you, as readers, to contribute reflections, reactions and rebuttals to the process. We encourage submissions from a diversity of authors, on a wide range of subjects, and would particularly encourage critical reflections from practitioners and research partnerships in the Global South.

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt
,
Sharon O’Brien
,
Patrick Cadwell
, and
Dónal P. O’Mathúna

proved useful in overcoming some language barriers, though others persisted ( Munro, 2013 ). The Haiti earthquake illustrates the multilingual nature of humanitarian crises and the importance of translation, as well as the close connection between language and humanitarian ICT innovations. These features are not unique to the Haiti earthquake, and many crises occur in contexts where linguistic diversity is greater. A recent example of the need for translation and interpreting

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Four Conversations with Canadian Communications Officers
Dominique Marshall

offer a powerful way to reach the public they want. The CRC team has added a ‘video talent’ specialist; WUSC expanded the use of videos as a medium to tell the stories of volunteers; and MCoS launched a series of ‘talks about diversity’. Leclair thinks that ‘intentionally offering our public the possibility to produce visual media enables them to see us as accessible; it makes it easier to get the message out about who we are and how people can be involved.’ She explains how some of WUSC platforms increasingly support the sharing of stories between the people involved

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Megan Daigle
,
Sarah Martin
, and
Henri Myrttinen

is a cliché, I think. It always pops up after an incident or scandal, and it’s not awareness – it’s internal control. Tick the box: yes, I’ve had them sit in front of a screen for 45 minutes. In front of a screen, on your own … it’s crap. 41 To return to Ahmed (2012) , then, HEAT trainings mirror institutional diversity trainings, where being seen to do something (implement trainings, produce guidance, enact policies

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Why Building Back Better Means More than Structural Safety
Bill Flinn

diversity of building typologies reflects the traditions and relative wealth of families. It also creates a vernacular architecture that attracts thousands of tourists to Nepal each year. The policy of only providing training for, and technically supporting, the rebuilding of stone, brick and reinforced concrete structures, excludes many other traditional and vernacular building typologies. Timber-frame and light-weight structures are inherently safer in an earthquake than masonry – excluding these traditional and vernacular building typologies is a missed opportunity to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Response to the Journal of Humanitarian Affairs Special Issue on Innovation in Humanitarian Action (JHA, 1:3)
Anna Skeels

build on our understanding of the participation of people affected by crises in humanitarian innovation and to explore the development of tools and guidance in response. In considering participation in innovation, we recognise the utmost importance of diversity and inclusion: Innovators must do their utmost to ensure that all vulnerable groups’ needs are recognised, that they have access to the assistance that is being provided and are included/participate in the innovation process as much as possible. ( Elrha, 2018a ) Participation is implicit in discussions

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action 1
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

: Queens, Crime and Empire ( London; New York : Routledge ). Harroff-Tavel , M. ( 2007 ), ‘ Cultural Diversity and the Challenges It Poses for Humanitarian Practitioners ’, in Abraham , G. , Strydom , H. and Cowling

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Synchronicity in Historical Research and Archiving Humanitarian Missions
Bertrand Taithe
,
Mickaël le Paih
, and
Fabrice Weissman

humanitarians who consider a historical perspective grounded in archival work useful for humanitarian practice. The power plays and negotiations these large missions entail, the diversity of social and economic partners, the complexity of engaging with ministries of health (MOH), universities and research institutes, pharmaceutical industries and international networks all add to the complexity of establishing archives which might enable historical thinking in the present and future of these missions

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Expanding Gender Norms to Marriage Drivers Facing Boys and Men in South Sudan
Michelle Lokot
,
Lisa DiPangrazio
,
Dorcas Acen
,
Veronica Gatpan
, and
Ronald Apunyo

well as previous assessments conducted by SCI in South Sudan. The sample sizes were identified by SCI staff who understand the context well, with some input from the consultants. In making decisions about sample size, the assessment was designed to reach many stakeholders in each location to capture a diversity of perspectives and ensure saturation. Based on previous studies, we aimed to implement 100 surveys per location, alongside four FGDs and 6–12 KIIs per location. Participants for surveys, FGDs and KIIs represented three different samples. Overall, Rumbek

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs