Open Access (free)
Cora Kaplan

The distinguished critic Professor Cheryl A. Wall (1948–2020) was the Board of Governors Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. Her path-breaking scholarship in two highly influential monographs, Women of the Harlem Renaissance (1995) and Worrying the Line: Black Women Writers, Lineage, and Literary Tradition (2005), helped to ensure that twentieth-century Black women writers were recognized and valued for their power, genius, and complexity. Her most recent book, On Freedom and the Will to Adorn: The Art of the African American Essay (2018), places the essay form at the center of African American literary achievement. Throughout her long career she supported and enabled Black students, and championed racial diversity and gender equality at every level of the university. An Associate Editor of James Baldwin Review, she was the most generous and astute of readers, as well as a wise editor. In this memorial section, fifteen colleagues, former students, and interlocutors share their remembrances and honor her legacy.

James Baldwin Review
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell, and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

proved useful in overcoming some language barriers, though others persisted ( Munro, 2013 ). The Haiti earthquake illustrates the multilingual nature of humanitarian crises and the importance of translation, as well as the close connection between language and humanitarian ICT innovations. These features are not unique to the Haiti earthquake, and many crises occur in contexts where linguistic diversity is greater. A recent example of the need for translation and interpreting

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Megan Daigle, Sarah Martin, and Henri Myrttinen

is a cliché, I think. It always pops up after an incident or scandal, and it’s not awareness – it’s internal control. Tick the box: yes, I’ve had them sit in front of a screen for 45 minutes. In front of a screen, on your own … it’s crap. 41 To return to Ahmed (2012) , then, HEAT trainings mirror institutional diversity trainings, where being seen to do something (implement trainings, produce guidance, enact policies

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Why Building Back Better Means More than Structural Safety
Bill Flinn

diversity of building typologies reflects the traditions and relative wealth of families. It also creates a vernacular architecture that attracts thousands of tourists to Nepal each year. The policy of only providing training for, and technically supporting, the rebuilding of stone, brick and reinforced concrete structures, excludes many other traditional and vernacular building typologies. Timber-frame and light-weight structures are inherently safer in an earthquake than masonry – excluding these traditional and vernacular building typologies is a missed opportunity to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Response to the Journal of Humanitarian Affairs Special Issue on Innovation in Humanitarian Action (JHA, 1:3)
Anna Skeels

build on our understanding of the participation of people affected by crises in humanitarian innovation and to explore the development of tools and guidance in response. In considering participation in innovation, we recognise the utmost importance of diversity and inclusion: Innovators must do their utmost to ensure that all vulnerable groups’ needs are recognised, that they have access to the assistance that is being provided and are included/participate in the innovation process as much as possible. ( Elrha, 2018a ) Participation is implicit in discussions

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

: Queens, Crime and Empire ( London; New York : Routledge ). Harroff-Tavel , M. ( 2007 ), ‘ Cultural Diversity and the Challenges It Poses for Humanitarian Practitioners ’, in Abraham , G. , Strydom , H. and Cowling

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

‘real world’ is defined by its empirical diversity and complexity. And hence, echoing Hayekian neoliberalism, largely beyond human comprehension. Development problems are specific to a given time and place. Indigenous livelihood and coping systems have evolved over centuries through discrete, complex interactions between people and their ‘hostile environmental conditions’ ( Edwards, 1987 : 120). Rather than trying to transfer knowledge through explanation, demonstration and reason, like Negroponte’s child, authentic learning is the organic

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

, then, a third possibility – humanitarianisms . A kind of normative pluralism. Of course, historically there have been many different ways to deal with those who suffer. This might well be the world we are entering again. But how much diversity can be tolerated? Could a humanitarian practice that argued it would help only ‘people like us’ and leave to suffer and die ‘people like them’ be judged genuinely humanitarian? If your answer is no, surely you are arguing for limits to the malleability of humanitarian social practice that aren

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Middle-Aged Syrian Women’s Contributions to Family Livelihoods during Protracted Displacement in Jordan
Dina Sidhva, Ann-Christin Zuntz, Ruba al Akash, Ayat Nashwan, and Areej Al-Majali

female interlocutors’ personal income is redistributed within kinship networks, who manages family resources and how women themselves benefit from the support of other family members. This approach, of course, draws inspiration from longstanding scholarship on the importance of kinship in the Middle East (cf. Joseph, 1994 , 2004 ) and the diversity and strength of ethnic, religious and regional groups in pre-war Syria ( Stevens, 2016 ). Before 2011, women cemented

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Lessons Learned for Engagement in Fragile and Conflict-Affected States
Logan Cochrane

alternatives. Readers should engage with the lessons and recommendations with this limitation in mind; lessons learned from complex operational environments will, at best, act as a means to make better-informed decisions. They will not transform a complex situation into a complicated technical one. As a result of this process, and due to the diversity, and sometimes project-specific nature, of evaluations and their content, not all of the lessons were included. For the sake of readability, not all of the reports that mentioned a particular lesson, challenge, insight or

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs