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Spectators, aesthetics and encompletion
Author: Chloe Porter

This book discusses early modern English drama as a part of visual culture. It concerns the ideas about 'making and unmaking' that Shakespeare and his contemporaries may have known and formulated, and how these ideas relate to the author's own critical assumptions about early modern aesthetic experience. The study of drama as a part of visual culture offers the perfect context for an exploration of pre-modern aesthetic discourse. The book expounds the author's approach to plays as participants in a lively post-Reformation visual culture in the process of 're-formation'. It then focuses on the social meanings of patronage of the visual arts in a discussion of Paulina as patron of Hermione's image in The Winter's Tale. The discussion of The Winter's Tale pivots around the play's troubling investment in patriarchal notions of 'perfection'. The book also explores image-breaking in Robert Greene's Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay. This play presents an instance of onstage iconoclasm in the supernatural destruction of a demonic brazen head, a quasi-magical figure that had been depicted in English literature since at least the twelfth century. In focusing on the portrayal of invisibility in The Two Merry Milkmaids, the book explores early modern preoccupation with processes of visual construction in a play in which there is very little artisanal activity.

Chloe Porter

This book discusses early modern English drama as a part of visual culture. But what is visual culture, and why use this phrase in place of the ‘fine arts’ or the ‘visual arts’? In part, this choice is motivated by my concern with exploring the plays in their historical contexts. Shakespeare and his contemporaries would not have recognised the phrase ‘fine arts’. Nor would

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
The unknowable image in The Winter’s Tale
Chloe Porter

Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale presents one of the most famous depictions of a patron of the visual arts in early modern English drama. In the penultimate scene of the play, we are told that the Sicilian courtier, Paulina, is in possession of a ‘statue’ of the dead Sicilian queen, Hermione (5.2.93). ‘Hearing of her mother’s statue’, Perdita, Hermione’s long

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Behind the screen
Chloe Porter

networks that produced early modern English drama. This dynamic is certainly at work in the painter anecdote in The Roaring Girl. The individual ‘painter’ alludes to the concept of a lone author; yet the painter also stands for the ‘we’ that is the writers and theatre company members (epilogue, 29). The collapsing of theatrical collaboration into this painterly figure therefore stands as a mode of

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Speaking pictures?
Chloe Porter

understand concepts of cultural production and reception as these register in early modern English drama. 6 In this respect my argument is highly unusual, since most studies in this area start from the point of the supposed absence of visual culture in an iconoclastic post-Reformation England blighted by lack of knowledge about the Italian visual arts. 7 Frederick Kiefer opens his study of the emblematic

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Invisibility and erasure in The Two Merry Milkmaids
Chloe Porter

questions, this chapter follows to its logical conclusion my initial claim that early modern English drama is a part of visual culture. Plays in performance are visual, material representations, watched by spectators. The participation of drama in visual culture is therefore not confined to dramatists’ direct allusions to or depictions of visual representations. This chapter therefore differs from previous

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Barbery, earwax and snip-snaps
Eleanor Decamp

‘reasty’, which also is etymologically linked to ‘reasy’ and ‘rusty’. 28 George Peele, The Old Wives Tale (1595), s.d. E1r. 29 See Helkiah Crooke, Mikrokosmographia (1615), p. 576; Walter Charleton, Natural History of Nutrition, Life, and Voluntary Motion (1659), p. 97. 30 Scipion Dupleix, The Resolver (1635), P2v. Cf. Pierre de La Primaudaye, The French Academie (1618) p. 127. 31 See Crooke, pp. 66–70. 32 Will Fisher, ‘Staging the Beard’, in Staged Properties in Early Modern English Drama, ed. Jonathan Gil Harris and Natasha Korda (Cambridge: Cambridge University

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
Divine destruction in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay
Chloe Porter

Modern English Drama (Farnham: Ashgate, 2009 ), p. 51. O’Connor discusses idolatry and iconoclasm in Fedele and Fortunio , as well as allusions to iconoclasm in Thomas Dekker’s The Whore of Bablylon (printed 1607), and Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher’s Cupid’s Revenge (1607–8), in ‘Imagine Me, Gentle Spectators’, pp. 370

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Eric Pudney

Female Male 6 4 2 0 1570s 1580s 1590s 1600s 1610s 1620s 1630s 1640s Graph 1  Printed plays featuring magic users, by gender Source: Figures are compiled on the basis of the entries for ‘witch’, ‘wizard’, and related terms in Thomas L. Berger, William C. Bradford, and Sidney L. Sondergard, An Index of Characters in Early Modern English Drama: Printed Plays, 1500–1660 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998). Plays surviving only in manuscript – including Middleton’s The Witch and Munday’s John a Kent and John a Cumber – are excluded. references to

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681
Critical and historical contexts of the Lord Mayor’s Show
Tracey Hill

, although his claim Critical and historical contexts 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 47 that Peele’s 1585 Show marks the ‘beginning of the representation of London in eulogistic terms’ overlooks the centuries of tradition that precede this date (London in Early Modern English Drama, p. 65). Gadd and Wallis, Guilds, Society and Economy, p. 5. I explore the consequences of the Companies’ changing realities at greater length in Chapter 5. See Robertson and Gordon, Collections III, p. xiv. Street pageants also took place in various locations on 17

in Pageantry and power