Straddling the fence

Sweden is seen as a forerunner in environmental and ecological policy. This book is about policies and strategies for ecologically rational governance, and uses the Swedish case study to ask whether or not it is possible to move from a traditional environmental policy to a broad, integrated pursuit of sustainable development, as illustrated through the ‘Sustainable Sweden’ programme. It begins by looking at the spatial dimensions of ecological governance, and goes on to consider the integration and effectiveness of sustainable development policies. The book analyses the tension between democracy and sustainable development, which has a broader relevance beyond the Swedish model, to other nation states as well as the European Union as a whole. It offers the latest word in advanced implementation of sustainable development.

Tony Fitzpatrick

. To some extent this has been due to the obstinacy of the USA yet, according to many Greens, it is also due to the inadequacies of ecological modernisation and the modesty of the weak sustainability at which it has aimed. The World Summit in Johannesburg in September 2002 is a useful illustration of this point. Corporations dominated the agenda, ensuring that voluntary guidelines rather than binding regulations would prevail. Poor countries were urged to make themselves more hospitable to inward investment, tying ecological policies into an agenda for privatisation

in After the new social democracy
Open Access (free)
On the possibility of sustainability and democracy in advanced industrial nations
Lennart J. Lundqvist

consciously heuristic; Sweden is viewed in recent scholarly debate as a forerunner on matters of environmental and ecological policy, and its launching of the programme for ‘Sustainable Sweden’ seemed to corroborate that view. If any country has come anywhere near meeting the criteria for ecologically rational government, Sweden might be that country. Given the evidence laid out in the preceding chapters, what remains to be assessed here is whether this is actually the case. The other was concern for cumulativity; much has been written on how ecological governance or an

in Sweden and ecological governance
Open Access (free)
How anarchism still matters
Jonathan Purkis and James Bowen

, are so readily available within the public domain that as a ‘resource’ they offer considerable potential. Thus an identification with concepts such as unsustainability or obsolescence would comprise a useful starting-point, not least because, as argued by German sociologist Klaus Eder (1996), environmental politics have become a significant framework within which much political debate now takes places. Basing a discursive bridge upon the newly developed frameworks of ecological policy (whatever the actual limitations) is consistent with ‘common sense’. From this

in Changing anarchism
Lennart J. Lundqvist

innovative opening of the non-environmental policies towards ecological policies in the comprehensive sense’ (Knoepfel 1995:198). The problem here is how to instil ecological concerns into the workings of traditionally non-environmental sectoral policies and agencies to achieve not only effective goal achievement, but also to do so in the most cost-effective way. The other problem is related to the strength of ecological concerns in such policy integration. Where the effectiveness/efficiency problem concerns how to integrate and how to make that integration work in a cost

in Sweden and ecological governance
Open Access (free)
Geoffrey K. Roberts and Patricia Hogwood

the fundamentalist wing of that party. His Marxist and environmentalist beliefs led him to resign from the party in 1985 in protest at the party’s failure to persist with ‘pure’ ecological policy positions. [See also: Realos and Fundis*] Balladur, Edouard Prime Minister of France 1993–95. Balladur was born in 1929 at Smyrna in Turkey. He studied law at Aix-en-Provence and at the

in The politics today companion to West European Politics