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Open Access (free)
An interdisciplinary approach to the study of demand and its role in innovation

This book brings together a range of sociologists and economists to study the role of demand and consumption in the innovative process. Starting with a broad conceptual overview of ways that the sociological and economics literatures address issues of innovation, demand and consumption, it goes on to offer different approaches to the economics of demand and innovation through an evolutionary framework, before reviewing how consumption fits into evolutionary models of economic development. The book then looks at food consumption as an example of innovation by demand, including an examination of the dynamic nature of socially constituted consumption routines. It includes an analysis of how African Americans use consumption to express collective identity and discusses the involvement of consumers in innovation, focusing on how consumer needs may be incorporated in the design of high-tech products. It also argues for the need to build an economic sociology of demand that goes from micro-individual through to macro-structural features.

Mark Harvey

4 Competition as instituted economic process Mark Harvey Introduction A challenge to the new economic sociology is that central economic processes should become the focus of theoretical and empirical sociological analysis. This chapter makes some steps towards analysing competition in that light, partly because competition is often assumed to be the market force of all market forces. The central argument made is both that competition processes are co-instituted with markets (including end markets), and that market processes are in turn co-instituted with

in Market relations and the competitive process
Open Access (free)
Stan Metcalfe and Alan Warde

9 Conclusion Stan Metcalfe and Alan Warde In conclusion we draw together and evaluate a number of the themes raised in this volume and begin to sketch an agenda for future research about markets and the competitive process. Happily, this book resides within a now-flourishing broader stream of ideas at the interface between economics and sociology. Some of this new work signals the resurrection of economic sociology, while other aspects of it emanate from within the literature on innovation processes and, more generally, from evolutionary economics. There has

in Market relations and the competitive process
Problems of polysemy and idealism
Andrew Sayer

2 Markets, embeddedness and trust: problems of polysemy and idealism Andrew Sayer Introduction In this paper I develop a critique of certain approaches to markets and firm behaviour in economics and economic sociology. There are two main targets of the critique. The first concerns some common approaches to markets and the nature of firms in relation to them. Here I argue that the diverse uses of the term ‘market’ in contemporary lay and academic discourse cause confusion. Also problematic in both mainstream and institutional economics is the tendency to treat

in Market relations and the competitive process
Andrew McMeekin, Ken Green, Mark Tomlinson, and Vivien Walsh

argues for the need to build an economic sociology/political economy of demand that goes from micro-individual through to macro-structural features. To achieve this, an ‘instituted economic process’ approach to the study of demand and innovation is developed to account for processes of institutionalisation and deinstitutionalisation. Within this framework, the concept of a ‘production–distribution–retail–consumption’ configuration is seen as shaping innovation. The empirical investigations of this chapter involve analysis of how retail markets link demand with supply

in Innovation by demand
An instituted economic process approach
Mark Harvey

This chapter argues for the need to build an economic sociology/political economy of demand that goes from micro-individual through to macro-structural features. It develops an ‘instituted economic process’ approach to the study of demand and innovation to account for processes of institutionalisation and deinstitutionalisation. Within this framework, the concept of a ‘production—distribution—retail—consumption’ configuration is seen as shaping innovation. The empirical investigations of this chapter involve analysis of how retail markets link demand with supply, and how that link is a structured one: the interface facing both ways. The chapter explores three empirical cases. The first involves the near disappearance of wholesale markets for fresh fruit and vegetables to retail markets, and the particular questions raised in terms of range and quality of products that flow through them. The second deals with an equally significant reconfiguration of the retail—distribution—production configuration reflected in the emergence of supermarket own-label products. The third raises the question of how the organisation of retail markets, and their transformation, alters the way demand is instituted between end consumers and retailers.

in Innovation by demand
Phil Almond

.J., Gunnigle, P. and Morley, M. (2013), ‘Determinants of central control and subsidiary autonomy in HRM: the case of foreign‐owned multinational companies in Spain’, Human Resource Management Journal, 23:3, 262–78. Challenges to societal effects in global competition 67 Biggart, N. W. and Beamish, T. D. (2013), ‘The economic sociology of conventions: habit, custom, practice, and routine in market order’,  Annual Review of Sociology, 29, 443–64. Birkinshaw, J. (2013), ‘How multinational subsidiary mandates are gained and lost’, Journal of International Business Studies

in Making work more equal
Constituting the cultural economy
Fran Tonkiss

market growth, urban and regional regeneration, and foreign trade. Here, ‘culture’ is taken to refer to a specific domain of aesthetic and expressive production that is susceptible to commodification in economic terms3 (see McAnany and Wilkinson, 1995; DCMS, 2001). Over the same period, theoretical accounts within economic sociology have focused not only on cultural production as an economic sector, but on the increasingly cultural content of wider production processes, of economic goods and services, and of economic life more generally (see Lash and Urry, 1994; du Gay

in Market relations and the competitive process
Israeli security experience as an international brand
Erella Grassiani

., 1998. Mastering Soldiers , New York: Berghahn. Bourdieu, P., 2002. ‘The Forms of Capital’, in N. Biggart, ed., Readings in Economic Sociology , Oxford: Blackwell. Buzan, B., O. Wæver, and J. De Wilde, 1998. Security: A New Framework for Analysis , Boulder, CO: Rienner. Coaffee, J. and P. Rogers, 2008. ‘Reputational Risk

in Security/ Mobility
Open Access (free)
A cognitive perspective
Gilles Allaire

-network approaches have developed in domains of research connected with food issues such as the sociology of risk, and have shed light on complex hybrid networks. Agro-food networks are revisited in the second section. 3 Karpik (1989) distinguishes social tools that create and diffuse quality judgements and social tools that build trust regarding quality definitions. These two dimensions of the notion of quality are generally emphasised by economic sociology, innovation sociology and heterodox economics. 4 The notion of ‘convention of quality’ (Eymard-Duvernet 1989) introduced a

in Qualities of food