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Pacifist feminism in Britain, 1870–1902
Author: Heloise Brown

This book explores the pervasive influence of pacifism on Victorian feminism. It provides an account of Victorian women who campaigned for peace, and of the many feminists who incorporated pacifist ideas into their writing on women and gender. The book explores feminists' ideas about the role of women within the empire, their eligibility for citizenship, and their ability to act as moral guardians in public life. It shows that such ideas made use – in varying ways – of gendered understandings of the role of force and the relevance of arbitration and other pacifist strategies. The book examines the work of a wide range of individuals and organisations, from well-known feminists such as Lydia Becker, Josephine Butler and Millicent Garrett Fawcett to lesser-known figures such as the Quaker pacifists Ellen Robinson and Priscilla Peckover.

Open Access (free)
Heloise Brown

pacifist ideas into their wider political analysis of women’s position. Feminists’ ideas of their role within the empire, their eligibility for citizenship and their suitability to act as moral guardians in public life, all made use in varying ways of gendered understandings of the role of force and the relevance of pacifist strategies such as arbitration. As a result, peace ideas had a pervasive influence on the Victorian women’s movement. Recent works by Sandi E. Cooper and Leila J. Rupp have also addressed some of the issues with which this book is concerned. Cooper

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