Search results

Open Access (free)
Planned Obsolescence of Medical Humanitarian Missions: An Interview with Tony Redmond, Professor and Practitioner of International Emergency Medicine and Co-founder of HCRI and UK-Med

In this interview with editors Tanja R. Müller and Gemma Sou, Tony Redmond reflects on his long career as a professor and practitioner of international emergency medicine and founder of UK-Med, an NGO that provides international emergency humanitarian medical assistance and which hosts the UK International Emergency Trauma Register (UKIETR) and UK International Emergency Medical Register (UKIEMR). He questions the usefulness of prioritising innovation in medical humanitarianism and advocates aiming for the same duty of care that one would offer in one’s everyday practice at home. In this, Tony is also critical of the term ‘humanitarian space’, as it by definition proclaims an imagined geographical entity where normal rules should not apply.

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editors’ Introduction

Emergency Medicine and founder of UK-Med, an NGO that provides international emergency humanitarian medical assistance and which hosts the UK International Emergency Trauma Register (UKIETR) and UK International Emergency Medical Register (UKIEMR). He questions the usefulness of seeking innovation in medical humanitarianism but advocates to aim for the same duty of care that one would offer in one’s everyday practice at home. In this, Tony is also critical of the term ‘humanitarian space’, as it by

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Narratives of balance and moderation at the limits of human performance

by the late nineteenth century contained breathing systems (designed for diving and mining as well as respiratory therapy) were sufficiently light and robust to take on an Alpine climbing trip. 17 But oxygen was used with very mixed success as a form of emergency medicine in these circumstances; altitude sickness was treated as an acute-onset disease for which the usual treatment was a retreat down the mountain. When oxygen was given it was prescribed as if it were a medication, on the onset of symptoms, and for

in Balancing the self