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New perspectives on socially engaged performance

The book advances our understanding of performance as a mode of caring and explores the relationship between socially engaged performance and care. It creates a dialogue between theatre and performance, care ethics and other disciplinary areas such as youth and disability studies, nursing, criminal justice and social care. Challenging existing debates in this area by rethinking the caring encounter as a performed, embodied experience and interrogating the boundaries between care practice and performance, the book engages with a wide range of different care performances drawn from interdisciplinary and international settings. Drawing on interdisciplinary debates, the edited collection examines how the field of performance and the aesthetic and ethico-political structures that determine its relationship with the social might be challenged by an examination of inter-human care. It interrogates how performance might be understood as caring or uncaring, careless or careful, and correlatively how care can be conceptualised as artful, aesthetic, authentic or even ‘fake’ and ‘staged’. Through a focus on care and performance, the contributors in the book consider how performance operates as a mode of caring for others and how dialogical debates between the theory and practice of care and performance making might foster a greater understanding of how the caring encounter is embodied and experienced.

Christine E. Hallett

the heroine, and the actions of other hospital personnel exist to create challenges for her. In others the professional nurse takes centre-stage, and the VAD is the all-seeing witness, capturing events, apparently without distortion. But such appearances are deceptive: VADs were far from dispassionate, and tensions between them and their professional supervisors resulted in a distortion of the historical record that has exaggerated the excess discipline of the military hospital and underplayed the emotional labour undertaken by nurses. A myth of wartime nursing has

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)
Caring performance, performing care
Amanda Stuart Fisher

transformation upon unsuspecting communities. In this sense, this edited collection also considers how theories and practices of care might challenge some of the assumptions made about socially engaged performance and the way efficacy is defined and measured within this field. This introduction now turns to further consider some definitions of care by examining some of the theorisation in this area developed within care ethics. Building on the concept of care as ‘embodied’ knowledge (Hamington, 2004 ) and a form of ‘emotional labour’ (Hochschild, 2012 ), the discussions of

in Performing care
Open Access (free)
White male vulnerability as heterosexual fantasy
Susanna Paasonen

increasingly whole as Christian opens to being physically touched and emotionally expressive. TRAUMA AND EMOTIONAL LABOUR Christian’s journey of self-​discovery and healing, as narrated by James, closely follows a popular Freudian route where sexual preferences and behaviours are rooted in childhood events, relationships and traumas. In other words, Freudian trauma functions here as a narrative template that runs parallel to and supports the genre conventions of romance and erotica. Christian dominates young brown-​haired women, having witnessed the abuse and death of his

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Emotions and research
Hannah Jones, Yasmin Gunaratnam, Gargi Bhattacharyya, William Davies, Sukhwant Dhaliwal, Emma Jackson and Roiyah Saltus

and as providing insight into our varying social differences, research roles, the differential distribution of emotional labour within the research team and how these might all impact on partnership working. As always the work of research and the thinking and feeling that goes with it extends far beyond the funding of a study. Even the publication of this book does not bring it to a close. In

in Go home?
Open Access (free)
Nursing work and nurses’ space in the Second World War: a gendered construction
Jane Brooks

nursing service that enabled the healing and recovery of battle-­scarred men. However, the development of more personal engagement with their patients was not without difficulty. As the chapter argues, comfort care was overlaid with the threat of sexual frisson, and their patients’ pain 14 Introduction and death demanded considerable emotional labour from the nurses themselves. Chapter 2 explores challenges to nursing care within the highly mobile war. Many of the difficulties related to the need to create a secure healing space within the harsh environments in which

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
Fluidity and reciprocity in the performance of caring in Fevered Sleep’s Men & Girls Dance
Amanda Stuart Fisher

suggest that cultural, economic and social barriers continue to make it difficult for men to participate equally in childcaring duties (see Sodha, 2018 ) and, as a consequence, caring for children remains socially constructed as an emotional labour that tends to be undertaken by women. This gendering of caring arguably contributes to the social acceptability of women being in close proximity with girls, but not men. While the gendering of care positions emotional labour and feeling work as intrinsically feminine, correlative discourses around masculinity, as Raewyn W

in Performing care
The failure and success of a Swedish film diversity initiative
Mara Lee Gerdén

tension between our respective projects that addressed and elaborated aspects of pain and emotional labour (but also creativity and agency) in relation to people of colour, and on the other hand the figure of ‘the invulnerable body of colour’. We participants wanted to explore counter-​narratives in depth but at the same time the construction of us, and so the participants, as ‘invulnerable bodies of colour’, informed the whole framing of the programme. The paradox in being discursively situated as ‘invulnerable bodies of colour’ yet ‘chosen’ to fight this very same

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
David M. Turner and Daniel Blackie

’s Employment Commission of their ability to bear children being affected by their bodily toil, they presented different fears about disablement to those expressed by their husbands and sons. When disability is seen as inability to work, it is often the ability to do paid work that is had in mind. Opening up definitions of work to include the numerous unpaid tasks traditionally performed by women, from the emotional labour of caring to domestic chores, will allow new perspectives on the relationship between disability and work to emerge. Finally, it is likely that the

in Disability in the Industrial Revolution
Tony Fitzpatrick

leisure away from restrictive masculinist conceptions of economic well-being. Indeed, since both ecologism and feminism argue for what I have here called ‘reproductivity’ (though the former stresses ecological labour and the latter emotional labour), then the scope for further convergence between these ideas is considerable. It is not the case that all forms of either feminism and environmentalism converge beneath the umbrella of post-productivist social democracy, since some will prefer productivist solutions and some will eschew social democracy altogether, but there

in After the new social democracy