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A new history of knowledge

This book tells the story of how modern environmentalism emerged in postwar Sweden. It shows that the ‘environmental turn’ in Sweden occurred as early as the autumn of 1967 and that natural scientists led the way. The most influential was the chemist Hans Palmstierna, who was both an active Social Democrat and a regular contributor to the nation’s leading morning paper. Thus, he had a unique platform from which to exert influence. Drawing on his rich and previously untapped personal archive, the book explores how popular environmental engagement developed in Sweden. The book also highlights the journalist Barbro Soller, who in the mid-1960s became Sweden’s – and indeed one of the world’s – first environmental journalists. Moreover, it demonstrates how the pioneering historian Birgitta Odén, in collaboration with the Swedish National Defence Research Institute, sought to launch an interdisciplinary research programme based in the humanities and the social sciences as early as 1967–1968. An important conclusion of the book is that environmentalism emerged in Swedish society before there was an actual environmental movement. However, from 1969 onwards new social movements began to alter the dynamics. Hence, by the time the United Nations arranged the Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment in June 1972, environmental knowledge had become a source of conflict between rival interests. The environmental turn in postwar Sweden is the first full-length study to emerge from the Lund Centre for the History of Knowledge (LUCK), and demonstrates how its specific take on the history of knowledge enhances historical scholarship.

David Larsson Heidenblad

Birgitta Odén, in collaboration with the Swedish National Defence Research Institute (FOA), political scientists, and economists, developed the interdisciplinary project ‘Miljö, naturresurser och samhälle’ [Environment, natural resources and society]. I follow her from the time when the first steps were taken, in May 1967, until she abandoned the project in the spring of 1969. I also analyse how she worked at the local level to build up an environmental-history research speciality at the Department of History at Lund University

in The environmental turn in postwar Sweden
Open Access (free)
Environmental justice and citizen science in a post-truth age
Editors: Thom Davies and Alice Mah

This book examines the relationship between environmental justice and citizen science, focusing on enduring issues and new challenges in a post-truth age. Debates over science, facts, and values have always been pivotal within environmental justice struggles. For decades, environmental justice activists have campaigned against the misuses of science, while at the same time engaging in community-led citizen science. However, post-truth politics has threatened science itself. This book makes the case for the importance of science, knowledge, and data that are produced by and for ordinary people living with environmental risks and hazards. The international, interdisciplinary contributions range from grassroots environmental justice struggles in American hog country and contaminated indigenous communities, to local environmental controversies in Spain and China, to questions about “knowledge justice,” citizenship, participation, and data in citizen science surrounding toxicity. The book features inspiring studies of community-based participatory environmental health and justice research; different ways of sensing, witnessing, and interpreting environmental injustice; political strategies for seeking environmental justice; and ways of expanding the concepts and forms of engagement of citizen science around the world. While the book will be of critical interest to specialists in social and environmental sciences, it will also be accessible to graduate and postgraduate audiences. More broadly, the book will appeal to members of the public interested in social justice issues, as well as community members who are thinking about participating in citizen science and activism. Toxic Truths includes distinguished contributing authors in the field of environmental justice, alongside cutting-edge research from emerging scholars and community activists.

Open Access (free)
David Larsson Heidenblad

the breakthrough of environmental issues? The ecological turn In international environmental history research, the late 1960s and early 1970s are referred to as ‘the ecological turn’ or ‘the ecological moment’. 30 This was when environmental issues seriously began to make their presence felt in politics, culture, and social life around the world. Characteristic of this development was that many scientists, such as Barry Commoner in the United States, Jean Dorst in France, and Hans Palmstierna in Sweden

in The environmental turn in postwar Sweden
David Larsson Heidenblad

results of this study? What does this investigation teach us about the breakthrough of environmental issues in Sweden? What new insights does this study offer to international environmental history research? A final chapter, however, is not only a place to summarize and distil research results. It also provides an opportunity to consider the scholarly choices that were made and what their consequences were. Such consideration raises broader issues of a theoretical and methodological nature related to the study of history

in The environmental turn in postwar Sweden
David Larsson Heidenblad

. International environmental history research has highlighted the late 1940s as a particularly significant era. That was when a new understanding was established of how humanity, nature, the world, and the future were connected. The very concept of ‘the environment’ gained a new meaning. Previously the term had referred to the external circumstances which affected humanity. Now it began to be used in order to indicate how human action was reshaping the world. Humanity was regarded as a force of nature and a danger to itself

in The environmental turn in postwar Sweden
Open Access (free)
Religion and spirituality in environmental direct action
Bronislaw Szerszynski and Emma Tomalin

environmental history. A sector of society had decided that the usual channels of political lobbying and Party politics had been ineffective in securing any substantial indication that the environment was to become a priority in national politics. By the end of the 1990s, although never completely dying out, this type of environmental protest had become less common and media interest in it had diminished. The large-scale actions against road building, for instance, had become virtually unheard of by the time that Labour beat the Conservative Party in the 1997 general election

in Changing anarchism
David Larsson Heidenblad

. 49 What follows is based on Larsson Heidenblad, ‘Miljöhumaniora på 1960-talet?’, pp. 44–45. 50 Birgitta Odén, ‘PM 1’ [‘Memorandum 1’], November 1967, BO 1, p. 1. 51 Ibid ., pp. 1–2. 52 Ibid. , pp. 2–3. 53 In recent years, environmental history research has increasingly drawn attention to the significance of the Cold War context. See Ronald Doel, ‘Constituting the Postwar Earth Sciences

in The environmental turn in postwar Sweden
Open Access (free)
Balancing the self in the twentieth century
Mark Jackson and Martin D. Moore

. 50 Lovelock, Gaia , pp. ix–x, 10. 51 Ibid., pp. 44–58, 100–14, 119. 52 Egerton, ‘Changing concepts of the balance of nature’. See also: G. Mitman, ‘In search of health: landscape and disease in American environmental history’, Environmental History

in Balancing the self
Peter C. Little

Study on Sustainable e-Waste Management in Ghana. Report by Ghana EPA, Green Advocacy Ghana, NVMP, VROM-­ Inspectie, and the Institute for Applied Ecology. Pratt, M. L. 1992. Imperial Eyes: Travel Writing and Transculturation. London: Routledge. Roberts, J. A. and Langston, N. (eds) 2008. Toxic bodies/toxic environments: An interdisciplinary forum. Environmental History, 13(4), 629–703. Rose, G. 2016. Visual Methodologies: An Introduction to Researching with Visual Materials. London: Sage. Rosenfeld, H., Moore, S., Nost, E., Roth, R. E., and Vincent, K. 2018

in Toxic truths