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A new history of knowledge

This book tells the story of how modern environmentalism emerged in postwar Sweden. It shows that the ‘environmental turn’ in Sweden occurred as early as the autumn of 1967 and that natural scientists led the way. The most influential was the chemist Hans Palmstierna, who was both an active Social Democrat and a regular contributor to the nation’s leading morning paper. Thus, he had a unique platform from which to exert influence. Drawing on his rich and previously untapped personal archive, the book explores how popular environmental engagement developed in Sweden. The book also highlights the journalist Barbro Soller, who in the mid-1960s became Sweden’s – and indeed one of the world’s – first environmental journalists. Moreover, it demonstrates how the pioneering historian Birgitta Odén, in collaboration with the Swedish National Defence Research Institute, sought to launch an interdisciplinary research programme based in the humanities and the social sciences as early as 1967–1968. An important conclusion of the book is that environmentalism emerged in Swedish society before there was an actual environmental movement. However, from 1969 onwards new social movements began to alter the dynamics. Hence, by the time the United Nations arranged the Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment in June 1972, environmental knowledge had become a source of conflict between rival interests. The environmental turn in postwar Sweden is the first full-length study to emerge from the Lund Centre for the History of Knowledge (LUCK), and demonstrates how its specific take on the history of knowledge enhances historical scholarship.

Professionalization and post-politics in the time of responsible golf
Brad Millington and Brian Wilson

and compliant way. In the final section of this chapter, however, we also provide a more critical assessment of the professionalization strategies described herein. We reflect especially on professionalization’s ideological function at this time: in positioning golf industry representatives as leaders in the environmental movement, professionalization tactics have served to elevate golf’s version of environmentalism to a ‘leading’ (i.e. hegemonic) position as well. We employ the aforementioned

in The greening of golf
David Larsson Heidenblad

. There was no organized environmental movement, and there were no green political parties. There was a strong trust in politicians’ power and collective solutions. However, in the half century that has passed since environmental issues made their major breakthrough, both the relevant set of problems and the knowledge about those problems have assumed different forms. Today we talk of a climate crisis rather than an environmental crisis. Of all the

in The environmental turn in postwar Sweden
David Larsson Heidenblad

hardly be characterized as an organized environmental movement. No such thing existed in Sweden or anywhere else at this time. By the beginning of the 1970s, though, the situation was different. That was when a number of new organizations of varying size and importance were founded. They included successful international networks such as Friends of the Earth and Greenpeace. But during the Swedish breakthrough phase of 1967 to 1968, environmental issues were being pursued within and via established organizations. Traditional

in The environmental turn in postwar Sweden
Open Access (free)
Environmental justice and citizen science in a post-truth age
Editors: Thom Davies and Alice Mah

This book examines the relationship between environmental justice and citizen science, focusing on enduring issues and new challenges in a post-truth age. Debates over science, facts, and values have always been pivotal within environmental justice struggles. For decades, environmental justice activists have campaigned against the misuses of science, while at the same time engaging in community-led citizen science. However, post-truth politics has threatened science itself. This book makes the case for the importance of science, knowledge, and data that are produced by and for ordinary people living with environmental risks and hazards. The international, interdisciplinary contributions range from grassroots environmental justice struggles in American hog country and contaminated indigenous communities, to local environmental controversies in Spain and China, to questions about “knowledge justice,” citizenship, participation, and data in citizen science surrounding toxicity. The book features inspiring studies of community-based participatory environmental health and justice research; different ways of sensing, witnessing, and interpreting environmental injustice; political strategies for seeking environmental justice; and ways of expanding the concepts and forms of engagement of citizen science around the world. While the book will be of critical interest to specialists in social and environmental sciences, it will also be accessible to graduate and postgraduate audiences. More broadly, the book will appeal to members of the public interested in social justice issues, as well as community members who are thinking about participating in citizen science and activism. Toxic Truths includes distinguished contributing authors in the field of environmental justice, alongside cutting-edge research from emerging scholars and community activists.

Open Access (free)
Design and material culture in Soviet Russia, 1960s–80s
Author: Yulia Karpova

The major part of this book project was funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 700913.

This book is about two distinct but related professional cultures in late Soviet Russia that were concerned with material objects: industrial design and decorative art. The Russian avant-garde of the 1920s is broadly recognised to have been Russia’s first truly original contribution to world culture. In contrast, Soviet design of the post-war period is often dismissed as hackwork and plagiarism that resulted in a shabby world of commodities. This book identifies the second historical attempt at creating a powerful alternative to capitalist commodities in the Cold War era. It offers a new perspective on the history of Soviet material culture by focusing on the notion of the ‘comradely object’ as an agent of progressive social relations that state-sponsored Soviet design inherited from the avant-garde. It introduces a shared history of domestic objects, handmade as well as machine-made, mass-produced as well as unique, utilitarian as well as challenging the conventional notion of utility. Situated at the intersection of intellectual history, social history and material culture studies, this book elucidates the complexities and contradictions of Soviet design that echoed international tendencies of the late twentieth century. The book is addressed to design historians, art historians, scholars of material culture, historians of Russia and the USSR, as well as museum and gallery curators, artists and designers, and the broader public interested in modern aesthetics, art and design, and/or the legacy of socialist regimes.

Paul Collinson

emerged from the environmental movement over the past three decades, have (with the odd exception) rarely been influential upon community development in Ireland. ‘Locals’ and ‘incomers’ in Donegal. These observations are reflected in rural Donegal. All villages and towns contain a plethora of community groups, focused on almost all sectors of the population and encompassing numerous and very varied activities. As far as most of them are concerned, however, environmental development is not one of them, since this is generally considered to be of a far lower priority to

in Alternative countrysides
Open Access (free)
David Larsson Heidenblad

with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1962) . It focused attention on the dangers of chemical pesticides and sparked fierce debates between nature-conservation interests, industry representatives, and government agencies. 39 Carson’s book, however, did not give rise to any grassroots movement, at least not right away. Instead, the birth moment of the American environmental movement was the holding of the first Earth Day on 22 April 1970. An estimated 20 million Americans participated in the event which channelled and strengthened

in The environmental turn in postwar Sweden
Open Access (free)
Science, activism, and policy concerning chemicals in our bodies
Phil Brown, Vanessa De La Rosa, and Alissa Cordner

impact of social movements on environmental science and policy. Social discovery and social movements Rachel Carson’s groundbreaking Silent Spring in 1962 ushered in the modern environmental movement by bringing mass public attention to environmental health effects of toxics. Carson showed how pesticides were serious hazards, causing morbidity and mortality in animals and humans (Carson 1962). Like many other pioneers in public health, Carson was sharply criticized by many for being unscientific and for attacking major economic sectors. Carson’s work and the growing

in Toxic truths
Open Access (free)
Approaching golf and environmental issues
Brad Millington and Brian Wilson

publications were in some respects more revealing than any of our interviews, as they detailed behind the scenes information about industry motivations and practices. We focus to a great extent on information from these publications from the 1960s to the present, recognizing that it was in the early 1960s when the environmental movement truly began. We do, however, also look back to industry trade documents from the early 1900s to help understand the full trajectory of golf’s environmental evolution. The

in The greening of golf