Open Access (free)
An international political economy of work
Author: Louise Amoore

Bringing fresh insights to the contemporary globalization debate, this text reveals the social and political contests that give ‘global’ its meaning, by examining the contested nature of globalization as it is expressed in the restructuring of work. The book rejects conventional explanations of globalization as a process that automatically leads to transformations in working lives, or as a project that is strategically designed to bring about lean and flexible forms of production, and advances an understanding of the social practices that constitute global change. Through case studies that span from the labour flexibility debates in Britain and Germany to the strategies and tactics of corporations and workers, it examines how globalization is interpreted and experienced in everyday life and argues that contestation has become a central feature of the practices that enable or confound global restructuring.

Editor’s Introduction
Michaël Neuman, Fernando Espada, and Róisín Read

Fortified Aid Compound: Everyday Life in Post-Interventionary Society ’, Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding , 4 : 4 , 453 – 74 . Fast , L. ( 2014 ), Aid in Danger: The Perils and Promise of Humanitarianism ( Philadelphia, PA : University of Pennsylvania Press ). Jackson

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

-technology use. In chapter 7, Leung presents the second analytical lens: actor–network theory. She opens the chapter describing Australia as a country in which the use of digital technology is part of everyday life for most people. This situation can be construed as a scenario in which both human and non-human actors establish a network, characterised by symmetry between the social and the technical ( Latour, 1999 , 2005 ). Leung relies on actor–network theory to reject the binary conceptualisation of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Politics of ‘Proximity’ and Performing Humanitarianism in Eastern DRC
Myfanwy James

political histories, situation, and networks that are central to their security practices. Humanitarianism is built on the idea of universal humanity, overlooking the fact that not everyone can perform neutrality with the same ease – to armed actors, or to their own humanitarian colleagues. Not everyone can ‘sing the song’. Ultimately, Congolese staff embody the contradictions of MSF’s approach in DRC: a simultaneous need for operational ‘proximity’, as well as performative distance from the politics of everyday life. MSF’s approach combines a simultaneous ‘engagement

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation
Tom Scott-Smith

Biennale because they were so practical and focused on everyday life, with thoughtful and humanistic ambitions. The projects were based on a simple idea: not to construct new shelters but to improve the empty office buildings that lay empty across Vienna after the financial crash. The walls of the bright white pavilion were illustrated with simple photographs, quotations and publications describing the approach, transforming dull grey offices into liveable accommodation by

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Megan Daigle, Sarah Martin, and Henri Myrttinen

). Duffield , M. ( 2010 ), ‘ Risk Management and the Fortified Aid Compound: Everyday Life in Post-Interventionary Society ’, Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding , 4 : 4 , 453 – 74 . Duffield , M. ( 2012 ), ‘ Risk Management and the Bunkering of the Aid Industry ’, Development

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Why Building Back Better Means More than Structural Safety
Bill Flinn

-effective approach. Here, it is sufficient to say that if self-recovery is seen as an inevitable process in many or most recovery processes, then families will rebuild using their own resources and according to their own priorities. The majority will not comply with any code. They will exercise their own agency and make choices in line with their perceived priorities. Building a house that is ‘safe’ may not be high on their list of priorities. More to the point, the family may really have little to no choice: the pressures of everyday life – feeding the kids, sending them to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

: 2 , 256 – 72 . Nissenbaum , H. and Patterson , H. ( 2016 ), ‘ Biosensing in Context: Health Privacy in a Connected World ’, in Nafus , D. (ed.), Quantified: Biosensing Technologies in Everyday Life ( Cambridge, MA : MIT

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

the everyday life experiences of West Africans in the communities affected are all but invisible now because the breach was contained. What normal does is obscure and disguise the reality of structural violence: that ‘normal’ society is full of need, suffering, violence (including structural and institutional violence) and the everyday suppression of multiple human freedoms, and that inequality of life risks is an endemic feature of the lives of poorer people. The ongoing private and state violence that takes place every day is rendered

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The case for practice theory
Matthew Hanchard

science. Digital maps and anchored time 155 This chapter argues that a practice theory approach, centring on how digital maps are used in everyday life, can contribute to the cartographic repertoire. Beginning with a sketch of cartographic theory from academic cartography to date, discussion places contemporary cartographic theory in context. This sets the scene in order to identify a historical limitation in cartographic theory that a practice theory of digital maps could address; namely, the wider anchoring of social practices. The following section provides an

in Time for mapping