Open Access (free)
Chris Toumey

14 Faith Chris Toumey I used to be younger. In 1987 I conducted an ethnography of the creationist movement as my dissertation research. Wonderful it was to be in the midst of the granddaddy of science and religion controversies in the years when creationism packaged itself as scientific creationism. That experience filled my head with ideas about relations between science and religion. A note to our European readers, including the British: yes, I realise it is beyond strange that in a major Western nation a large proportion of the population continues to

in Science and the politics of openness
Rousseau’s and nationalism
Mads Qvortrup

4 A civic profession of faith: Rousseau’s and nationalism When Heinrich Heine, the German poet, visited Italy in 1828 he noted in his diary: It is as if World History is seeking to become spiritual … she has a great task. What it is? It is emancipation. Not just the emancipation of the Irish, the Greeks, the Jews and the Blacks of the West Indies. No, the emancipation of the whole world, especially in Europe, where the peoples have reached maturity. (Heine quoted in Gell 1998: 13) In seeking national self-determination Heine was preaching a new doctrine, one

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
David Rieff

when he told an assembly of relief NGOs that they were a ‘tremendous force multiplier’ for the US military, but even in the Donald Trump administration that sense of things is by no means wholly absent. But if the view from Washington, Brussels, etc. may not have changed that much, the view of Washington, Brussels, etc., most certainly has. For all its bad faith, its selective implementation and, in the battle spaces of the Long War, its instrumentalisation in the service of military strategy, development aid from the US, the EU and other Western

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Model for Historical Reflection in the Humanitarian Sector
Kevin O’Sullivan and Réiseal Ní Chéilleachair

. ( 2012 ), Getting Somalia Wrong: Faith, War and Hope in a Shattered State ( London : Zed Books ). Hilton , M. ( 2018 ), ‘ Oxfam and the Problem of NGO Aid Appraisal in the 1960s ’, Humanity: An International Journal of Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and Development , 9 : 1 , 1 – 18 , doi: 10.1353/hum.2018.0000 . Korff , V. P

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

version of humanitarian action is likely to be less liberal too. Modern Humanism and Liberal World Order Could anyone working in good faith in the field of global humanitarianism today argue that only some lives should be saved, and only some suffering curtailed, because one class of persons is more important than another? It was possible to make this claim openly once, when one’s fellow nationals and co-religionists were the target of ‘humanitarian’ actions, but it hasn’t been permissible to make it legitimately in the global humanitarian system

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

‘manipulated video will ultimately destroy faith in our strongest remaining tether to the idea of a common reality’ ( Foer, 2018 ). Who Is Making Disinformation about Humanitarian Crises? The creators of disinformation are motivated by multiple factors. Some seek financial gain, such as the teenagers in Macedonia who famously produced false news stories in the lead up to the 2016 US election ( Silverman & Alexander, 2016 ). In humanitarian crises, however, the more common driver of disinformation creation appears to be partisanship and political

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Interpreting Violence on Healthcare in the Early Stage of the South Sudanese Civil War
Xavier Crombé and Joanna Kuper

State Hospital, the assault on people sheltering in the mosque on 15 April appeared indiscriminate, combining predation and killing. Yet the attack on the mosque also reflected the crude association of a population with foreign status and presumed Muslim faith with Darfuri and JEM members. Local civilians’ alleged participation in the predation and violence in fact suggests that the hunt for ‘traitors’ in the mosque provided justification for opportunistic violence

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The churches and emigration from nineteenth-century Ireland
Author: Sarah Roddy

The book knits together two of the most significant themes in the social and cultural history of modern Ireland - mass emigration and religious change - and aims to provide fresh insight into both. It addresses the churches' responses to emigration, both in theory and in practice. The book also assesses how emigration impacted on the churches both in relation to their status in Ireland, and in terms of their ability to spread their influence abroad. It first deals with the theoretical positions of the clergy of each denomination in relation to emigration and how they changed over the course of the nineteenth century, as the character of emigration itself altered. It then explores the extent of practical clerical involvement in the temporal aspects of emigration. This includes attempts to prevent or limit it, a variety of facilitation services informally offered by parish clergymen, church-backed moves to safeguard emigrant welfare, clerical advice-giving and clerically planned schemes of migration. Irish monks between the fifth and eighth centuries had spread Christianity all over Europe, and should act as an inspiration to the modern cleric. Tied in with this reading of the past, of course, was a very particular view of the present: the perception that emigration represented the enactment of a providential mission to spread the faith.

Here be monsters

This book contributes to the study of science and politics by shedding light on sometimes dark, hidden or ignored aspects of openness as a core policy agenda. While opening up of science to public scrutiny and public deliberation is good in principle, various dilemmas and problems are entailed by this move, which also should be made public and be discussed more openly. Developed as a solution to perceived crises in science/society relations, openness and transparency initiatives might hide ‘monsters’ that need to be made visible and need to be examined. Chapters in this book deal with four themes: transparency in the context of science in the public sphere; responsibility in the context of in contemporary research practice and governance, both globally and locally; experts in the context of policy-making, risk assessment and the regulation of science; and faith in the context of tensions and misunderstandings between science and religion. Each section of the book contains an opening essay by experts on a particular theme (Mark Brown, Benjamin Worthy, Barbara Prainsack/Sabina Leonelli, Chris Toumey). The book closes with an epilogue by Stephen Turner and an essay by John Holmwood. At present, openness in science is more important than ever. This book should be of interest to academics and members of the public who want to know more about the challenges and opportunities of 'making science public' - the theme of a Leverhulme Trust funded research programme on which this book is based.

Open Access (free)
Simha Goldin

new adherents from the ranks of the rival religion was seen as a confirmation of its truth, conversion from Judaism to Christianity was understood by Christians as a vindication of the superiority of their faith and of their success in the world. Within Germany and northern France (and, later, of England), from the second half of the tenth century on, we find proof that the Jewish group saw Christianity not only as a theological rival competing with it over the basic principles of religion but as a stubborn and persistent enemy that sought to destroy Judaism. It

in Apostasy and Jewish identity in High Middle Ages Northern Europe