Open Access (free)
Gender, sexuality and transgression
Author: Jenny DiPlacidi

This book demonstrates that incest was representative of a range of interests crucial to writers of the Gothic, often women or homosexual men who adopted a critical stance in relation to the heteronormative patriarchal world. In repositioning the Gothic, representations of incest are revealed as synonymous with the Gothic as a whole. The book argues that extending the traditional endpoint of the Gothic makes it possible to understand the full range of familial, legal, marital, sexual and class implications associated with the genre's deployment of incest. Gothic authors deploy the generic convention of incest to reveal as inadequate heteronormative ideologies of sexuality and desire in the patriarchal social structure that render its laws and requirements arbitrary. The book examines the various familial ties and incestuous relationships in the Gothic to show how they depict and disrupt contemporary definitions of gender, family and desire. Many of the methodologies adopted in Gothic scholarship and analyses of incest reveal ongoing continuities between their assumptions and those of the very ideologies Gothic authors strove to disrupt through their use of the incest trope. Methodologies such as Freudian psychoanalysis, as Botting argues, can be positioned as a product of Gothic monster-making, showing the effect of Gothic conventions on psychoanalytic theories that are still in wide use today.

Open Access (free)
Jazzing the Blues Spirit and the Gospel Truth in James Baldwin’s “Sonny’s Blues”
Steven C. Tracy

The webs of musical connection are essential to the harmony and cohesion of James Baldwin’s “Sonny’s Blues.” As a result, we must explore the spectrum of musical references Baldwin makes to unveil their delicate conjunctions. It is vital to probe the traditions of African-American music—Spirituals, Blues, Jazz, and Pop—to get a more comprehensive sense of how Baldwin makes use of music from the sacred and secular continuum in the African-American community. Looking more closely at the variety of African-American musical genres to which Baldwin refers in the story, we can discern even more the nuances of unity that Baldwin creates in his story through musical allusions, and shed greater light on Baldwin’s exploration of the complexities of African-American life and music, all of which have as their core elements of human isolation, loneliness, and despair ameliorated by artistic expression, hope, and the search for familial ties. Through musical intertextuality, Baldwin demonstrates not only how closely related seemingly disparate (in the Western tradition) musical genres are, but also shows that the elements of the community that these genres flow from and represent are much more in synchronization than they sometimes seem or are allowed to be. To realize kinship across familial (Creole), socio-economic (the brother), and most importantly for this paper appreciation and meanings of musical genres advances to Sonny the communal cup of trembling that is both a mode and an instance of envisioning and treating music in its unifying terms, seeing how they coalesce through a holistic vision.

James Baldwin Review
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Putting the countryside back to work
David Calder

This chapter analyses the conversion of a rural factory (camera case manufacturer Photosacs in Corbigny) into an arts centre and base of operations for street theatre company Metalovoice, a project designed to transform Corbigny into a rural cultural hub. But it risks being intelligible as part of a scenario of development that has long subordinated rural workers (especially women) to urban markets and consumers. In response, Metalovoice position themselves as artisans with familial ties to industrial heritage. The discourses produced by and about a street theatre institution and the industrial aesthetics of Metalovoice's inaugural event are linked by the folded logic of reincorporation: material from the past is resurrected for use in the present, changing the meaning of past and present in the process. Attempts to refashion history by discursively and aesthetically linking industrial workers and artists might grant both groups symbolic clout, but they might also obscure the gendered specificities of a local labour history. Through an intentionally micro-level analysis – of one event at one factory in one small town – the chapter links street theatre’s present economic function to its ability to reorder people, spaces, and times.

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
Open Access (free)
Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

of public and private abuses. 49 When Maggie Kilgour argues that ‘Incest … suggests an abnormal and extreme desire (a violation of natural familial ties)’, she similarly picks up on the notion of incest as an aberrant violation of the bonds of family. 50 In locating incest as an unwanted and forceful transgression of ‘natural familial ties’, these desires are

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Simha Goldin

daughter who were converted may marry one another, the biological son of a convert does not inherit from his father, and biological relatives who converted may testify against one another in a Rabbinic Court. The halakhic logic is flawless: familial relationships are absolute only when they are within the Jewish framework. Even one who departs from Judaism and cuts himself off from it cannot sever his familial ties and remains within the ethnic family, which is part of his identity. By contrast, one who joins the ethnic family as a proselyte severs all of his previous

in Apostasy and Jewish identity in High Middle Ages Northern Europe
Open Access (free)
Cousins and the changing status of family
Jenny DiPlacidi

, the mysterious familial ties surrounding the heroine and her lover (her almost double cousin) emphasise instant familial attraction and female choice in spousal selection. Roche complicates an endogamic union sought by kin that creates a static family unit by making the marriage a love match based on the heroine’s instant attraction to a penniless suitor. The novel is unusual in having the male love interest discovered

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Linda Maynard

. The siblings were, by that summer, well versed in the separations occasioned by attendance at public school and university. Traditionally, their annual break would have been a time to reforge familial ties. Unable to place that summer’s events within this familiar context, Pat retrospectively ascribed meaning to the feelings of puzzlement experienced in August 1914. Many partings took place at railway stations, ‘the closest point of contact’ between London (and other points of departure) and the war. 9 At this interface, Gregory writes, traditional social and

in Brothers in the Great War
Open Access (free)
Linda Maynard

his brother’s friendship and feel ‘more of a stranger with him than with many a political acquaintance’. 134 The rift between the Allen brothers was short lived. Godfrey later joined Clifford in southern France, where he was convalescing, his ill health being a consequence of his imprisonment. Snapshots of ill-feeling can be misleading; siblings united in times of need, or reconciled their differences with the passing of time. Domestic ties Historians have examined the strong pull of familial ties, and combatants’ use of domestic metaphors to sustain ties to

in Brothers in the Great War
Open Access (free)
Thefts, violence and sexual threats
Jenny DiPlacidi

that ‘suggests an abnormal and extreme desire (a violation of natural familial ties) that is antithetical to and subversive of social requirements’. 29 However, rather than being shown as ‘unnatural’ incest is often portrayed instead as a natural desire, as a ‘more than’ familial love; rather than a violation of familial love it is an extension of it. 30 The result of

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Tony Fitzpatrick

to their near contemporaries rather than strong familial ties to their children. Let us assume a horizon of 200 years stretching from 2000 to 2200. The participants know this, and are therefore aware of what is at stake environmentally, though none of the individuals know where they themselves belong. Individuals are unlikely to advocate profligacy, in case they should find themselves in an environmental wasteland of later generations; though nor is asceticism likely to be popular as this imposes draconian sacrifices on earlier generations. So, a low–low approach

in After the new social democracy