Open Access (free)
Author: Janet Wolff

This book can be described as an 'oblique memoir'. The central underlying and repeated themes of the book are exile and displacement; lives (and deaths) during the Third Reich; mother-daughter and sibling relationships; the generational transmission of trauma and experience; transatlantic reflections; and the struggle for creative expression. Stories mobilised, and people encountered, in the course of the narrative include: the internment of aliens in Britain during the Second World War; cultural life in Rochester, New York, in the 1920s; the social and personal meanings of colour(s). It also includes the industrialist and philanthropist, Henry Simon of Manchester, including his relationship with the Norwegian explorer, Fridtjof Nansen; the liberal British campaigner and MP of the 1940s, Eleanor Rathbone; reflections on the lives and images of spinsters. The text is supplemented and interrupted throughout by images (photographs, paintings, facsimile documents), some of which serve to illustrate the story, others engaging indirectly with the written word. The book also explains how forced exile persists through generations through a family history. It showcases the differences between English and American cultures. The book focuses on the incidence of cancers caused by exposure to radioactivity in England, and the impact it had on Anglo-American relations.

Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

still living in New York. He was eighty years old at the time of my visit – still active as a financial analyst, and keen to discuss family history with me. Later he sent me photocopies of the ‘Manchester’ pages of his father’s diary. August 17th The day is a dull and threatening one and the atmosphere is murky. But here in Manchester it is considered a fair day indeed, for rain and fog is the average lot of Manchestrians. The city’s main industry is cotton goods manufacturing and there are a great many mills here. The smoke of the chimneys together with the usual

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

In this chapter, the author talks about his father's interest in philately than in chemistry. The author's own family's history can be read through stamps. The first new stamps were contemporary German stamps, overprinted with 'Sarre', and with a heavy solid bar striking out the 'Deutsches Reich' at the bottom. The Schwitters portrait of Klaus Hinrichsen was one of six 2010 special issue stamps in the Isle of Man. Among the others are paintings by other internees such as Herbert Kaden, Herman Fechenbach, Imre Goth and an artist known as Bertram.

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

In this chapter, the author, through a family history, speaks of how forced exile persists through generations. From Claude Levy's own narrative in the film,The Jewish Cemetery - the Last Jews of Wasgau, and from an article about him in another German newspaper, Die Rheinpfalz, she learned a few new things about the family. The German television channel OKTV Südwestpfalz livestreamed this film by the American filmmaker Peter Blystone. The film focuses on small German towns and gives an account of what happened to the Jews there after the Nazi accession to power in January 1933.

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Tracing relatedness and diversity in the Albanian–Montenegrin borderland
Jelena Tošić

-establish contact with their relatives in Montenegro, contact that had been almost entirely lost by the closure of the border in 1948. In the course of my research on the coexistence of ethnically and religiously diverse populations in the Shkodra region (see Figure 4.1), where I collected life stories and family histories, I encountered several cases of family (re-)connection, including the reconstruction of genealogies. Having framed my research as a regional comparison (Gingrich and Fox 2002), I was drawn into this ongoing ‘genealogical cross-border movement’ and became both a

in Migrating borders and moving times
Continuity and change
Erin Bell and Ann Gray

VII. The BBC and Channel 4 versions of the Middletons’ family history suggest different roles on the part of the broadcasters, and different preconceptions of their audiences, as much as they offer rival interpretations of the royal baby’s ancestry. A focus upon genealogy is, though, hardly surprising given the wider public interest in family history research, mirrored in the hugely successful BBC

in The British monarchy on screen
Sam Barrett

could create an extensive localised kinship network which the historian simply does not detect when looking at individual communities 22 – but the rewards are considerable. This chapter will use family reconstitutions linked to a range of supplementary data for six communities in the West Riding during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, in order to reconstruct the depth of local and regional kinship networks and then to elaborate the place of kinship in the economy of makeshifts. Utilising over 18,000 discrete family histories I will suggest that kinship

in The poor in England 1700–1850
Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

to know more. How could I understand my father and his all too violent concern for me if I did not know more of his father? It was not difficult to trace him, the missing grandfather. Absurd in a way, since we seem to spend all our lives trying to piece together traces of people we are close to in the hope of finding out who they – and we – are. Searches of the Register of Deaths in Somerset House showed that he had died when I was twelve. I managed to trace more of the family history – motivated now by all the questions I had failed to ask as a child, I combed the

in Change and the politics of certainty
Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

, then we have the potential to resist interpellation’s colonising move. The monotheistic god’s-eye view becomes difficult to sustain in the face of the vagaries and specificities of our own lives and their various demands and engagements. We are not separate, objective academics, gazing down at the planet and attempting to save it, but fragile, mortal beings who are part and parcel of the ecosystem, as well as of the geopolitical and family histories into which we are born. And yet, it is very tempting to think otherwise. It is hard, especially for someone authorised

in Change and the politics of certainty
Open Access (free)
Everyday trajectories of activism
Hilary Pilkington

’ to anger about their own treatment by the Dutch social security system when ‘those foreigners get everything’ while, at the wider community level, it is reminiscent of Rhodes’s (2011: 108) analysis of how BNP voters in Burnley constructed particular ‘Asian/Pakistani/Muslim’ areas of the town as receiving ‘a disproportionate share of council monies’. ‘Them are EDL so best we’re EDL’: socialisation and solidarity There is some evidence that family histories of voting for far right parties and growing up in extreme right families are important in forming racist views

in Loud and proud