Open Access (free)
Undoing the Past in Jean Améry and James Baldwin
Joseph Weiss

This article compares the works of James Baldwin and Jean Améry, a survivor of the Jewish Holocaust. It attempts to unpack the ethical and political implications of their shared conception of the temporality of trauma. The experiences of the victim of anti-Semitism and the victim of anti-Black racism not only parallel one another, but their mutual incapacity to let go of the injustice of the past also generates a unique ethico-political response. The backward glance of the victim, the avowed incapacity to heal, as well as the phantasmatic desire to reverse time all guide this unique response. Instead of seeking forgiveness for the wrong done and declaring that all forms of resentment are illegitimate, Baldwin and Améry show us that channeling the revenge fantasy that so often attends the temporality of trauma is the material precondition of actually ending that trauma. This ultimately suggests that, for both thinkers, anything less than a new, revolutionary humanism equipped with an internationalist political project would betray the victims’ attempt to win back their dignity.

James Baldwin Review
Monika Gehlawat

Using political and critical theory, this article identifies in James Baldwin a model for citizenship unique to the Black artist who assumed the dual responsibilities of art practice and political activism. I engage with Baldwin’s fiction and his writing about other Black artists working in theater, film, dance, and music during the period of the civil rights movement. Across his career, Baldwin’s prevailing view was that, because of their history, Black artists have the singular, and indeed superlative, capacity to make art as praxis. Baldwin explains that the craft of the Black artist depends upon representing truths, rather than fantasies, about their experience, so that they are at once artists pursuing freedom and citizens pursuing justice. This article pays particular attention to the tension between living a public, political life and the need for privacy to create art, and ultimately the toll this takes on the citizen artist. Baldwin demonstrates how the community of mutual support he finds among Black artists aids in their survival. In his writings on Sidney Poitier and Lorraine Hansberry, his friendships with Beauford Delaney and Josephine Baker, as well as his reviews of music and literature, Baldwin assembles a collective he refers to as “I and my tribe.”

James Baldwin Review
Editor’s Introduction
Juliano Fiori

everything in the economic sphere and its disintegration of tradition in the social sphere. Globalisation has uprooted people symbolically as well as materially. A growing ‘impulse’ for social protection has received little response from the receding welfare state. 3 In the absence of an economic resolution, the assertion of cultural sovereignty has become a fuite en arrière – a retreat, to nostalgic fantasies of grandeur, fascistic tropes of national belonging and religious fundamentalisms. 4 Ressentiment has given rise to diverse anti

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Valérie Gorin and Sönke Kunkel

. ( 1994 ), ‘ Innocents Abroad: Western Fantasies of Childhood and the Iconography of Emergencies ’, Disasters , 18 : 3 , 238 – 53 . Campbell , D. ( 2012 ), ‘ The Iconography of Famine ’, in Batchen , G. (eds), Picturing Atrocity ( London : Reaktion Books ), pp. 79

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Megan Daigle, Sarah Martin, and Henri Myrttinen

fantasies, projected onto them by white colleagues. 16 These women are likely to be further marginalised on account of their nationalities, as ‘local’ or ‘third-country nationals’ rather than expats or ‘internationals’: [W]e are most times deployed in settings which [are] deeply patriarchal or where men do not respect women ... In general terms, yes, black women who report the case are not handled in the same way as a white woman … So

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Author: Jenny Edkins

Despite the imperative for change in a world of persistent inequality, racism, oppression and violence, difficulties arise once we try to bring about a transformation. As scholars, students and activists, we may want to change the world, but we are not separate, looking in, but rather part of the world ourselves. The book demonstrates that we are not in control: with all our academic rigour, we cannot know with certainty why the world is the way it is, or what impact our actions will have. It asks what we are to do, if this is the case, and engages with our desire to seek change. Chapters scrutinise the role of intellectuals, experts and activists in famine aid, the Iraq war, humanitarianism and intervention, traumatic memory, enforced disappearance, and the Grenfell Tower fire, and examine the fantasy of security, contemporary notions of time, space and materiality, and ideas of the human and sentience. Plays and films by Michael Frayn, Chris Marker and Patricio Guzmán are considered, and autobiographical narrative accounts probe the author’s life and background. The book argues that although we might need to traverse the fantasy of certainty and security, we do not need to give up on hope.

Open Access (free)
White male vulnerability as heterosexual fantasy
Susanna Paasonen

 133 8 SPECTACULARLY WOUNDED White male vulnerability as heterosexual fantasy Susa nna Paa sonen I n a 2012 interview, E. L. James, the author of the massively popular Fifty Shades novel series, describes its male protagonist Christian Grey as ‘the ultimate fantasy guy. And that’s the point: As long as you accept that fantasy guy –​fantasy sex, fantasy lifestyle, a broken man who needs fixing through love –​what woman could resist that?’ (in Thomas, 2012.) Grey is a twenty-​seven-​year-​old, white, cis-​gendered, Seattle-​based multi-​billionaire businessman

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

the face of violence, working alongside those already involved in this every day rather than studying them from the outside. Each of the chapters has approached the question of how this might work in different ways. Concepts and practices such as memory studies, security and intervention, and enforced disappearance have formed the ground for these explorations. Central to the discussion has been the idea of a demand for justice, but what justice might be has not been addressed. Giving up on changing the world involves traversing the fantasy that we can know what

in Change and the politics of certainty
Sara Haslam

6 Visions in colour; religious visions According to the analysis in the last chapter, as William Sorrell travelled through the realised realm of his unconscious, what had been repressed in him was gradually translated into glorious action. His journey culminated, in the ‘real’ world of the text, in a poised harmony where talk, trust and fantasy, and the professional demands of publishing, could co-exist. (Feminine) nature and (masculine) civilisation were united. In The New Humpty-Dumpty, as Emily Aldington and Count Macdonald made love, they did so in a way

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

mere seventeen years earlier, the more recent Algerian War, and the anxieties and tensions of the ongoing Cold War.8 The underground world of prisoners and experiments conjures up the atmosphere of the Nazi camps, and images of the scenes of destruction of Paris reflect the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the fire-bombed cities of Germany. The Cuban missile crisis took place in 1962 and the tensions in the film embody the sense prevalent at that time of nuclear war as an imminent prospect. The film offers what I read as two distinct fantasies of the future

in Change and the politics of certainty