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The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire
Author: Katie Pickles

Through a study of the British Empire's largest women's patriotic organisation, formed in 1900 and still in existence, this book examines the relationship between female imperialism and national identity. It throws light on women's involvement in imperialism; on the history of ‘conservative’ women's organisations; on women's interventions in debates concerning citizenship and national identity; and on the history of women in white settler societies. After placing the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire (IODE) in the context of recent scholarly work in Canadian, gender and imperial history, and post-colonial theory, the book follows the IODE's history through the twentieth century. Chapters focus upon the IODE's attempts to create a British Canada through its maternal feminist work in education, health, welfare and citizenship. In addition, the book reflects on the IODE's responses to threats to Anglo-Canadian hegemony posed by immigration, World Wars and Communism, and examines the complex relationship between imperial loyalty and settler nationalism. Tracing the organisation into the postcolonial era, where previous imperial ideas are outmoded, it considers the transformation from patriotism to charity, and the turn to colonisation at home in the Canadian North.

Organizing principles, 1900–1919
Katie Pickles

production of its own brand of female imperialism. As Dominic Alessio suggests in his examination of female personifications in the ‘white’ British ‘colonies’ from 1886 to 1940, women were constructed as ‘agents of civilization’, their role moving beyond the symbolic to that of active racial and moral agents. 2 As Anna Davin articulated in 1978, such maternal civilizing work was deeply infused

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Katie Pickles

, but they demonstrate that times do not change as quickly as we might think. The history of the IODE and its part in the making of Anglo-Canada in the image of Britain demands that we constantly challenge those whom we choose as agents in explaining the past – and the present. In focusing on the IODE this book makes a contribution to the new area of female imperialism. The IODE’s unique position, as

in Female imperialism and national identity
Daughters of the Empire, mothers in their own homes, 1929–45
Katie Pickles

drew upon notions of female imperialism developed at the beginning of the century. Making a British Canada during the 1930s Soon after the Schoolgirl Tour the IODE asked the SOSBW if it could become the Society’s sole Canadian representative in Canada. The situation became tense when the SOSBW turned down the request. The SOSBW condescendingly wrote to the

in Female imperialism and national identity
Katie Pickles

enthusiastic patriotism. As Clark Murray declared: ‘do not forget that the destiny of our Empire lies in the hands of our women and our children, more than in politics and in parliaments’. 7 Thus, Clark Murray and other patriotic women around the British Empire expressed a female imperialism, that placed great importance in, and was justified by, an appeal to women’s perceived maternal capabilities

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Katie Pickles

throughout this book. More specifically, the IODE was first and foremost a patriotic organization, advancing its own particular brand of female imperialism. Although unusual, as women’s patriotism was an awkward fit with the gendered masculine domain of politics, nation and empire, here the IODE was not alone, as there were other groups of solely patriotic women – most notably, the Victoria League, the South

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Women, internal colonization and indigenous peoples
Katie Pickles

Bay, where she saw a group of school children using a map, and others in the community using skates and skis, all sent by the IODE. 49 Female imperialism on the retreat The second phase of the IODE’s work in Labrador is no longer in tune with government policy, and is moreover in a period of crisis and retreat. Overall, the Canadian north has not

in Female imperialism and national identity
Christine E. Hallett

., ‘General Warner’, Saint John Globe (27 February 1917:  4); Anon., ‘General D. B. Warner, War Veteran’, Saint John Globe (27 February 1917): 10; Anon., obituary for General Darius B. Warner, Daily Telegraph (28 February 1917): 7. 72 Le petit paradis des blessés 81 Quinn, Agnes Warner: 41. 82 Agnes Warner was the third of six siblings: one older brother died in infancy before she was born; one younger brother died in early childhood in 1877. Quinn, Agnes Warner: 41. 83 Anon., My Beloved Poilus. 84 Katie Pickles, Female Imperialism and National Identity: Imperial Order

in Nurse Writers of the Great War