Open Access (free)
Editor: Paul Grainge

As a technology able to picture and embody the temporality of the past, cinema has become central to the mediation of memory in modern cultural life. The memory of film scenes and movies screens, cinema and cinema-going, has become integral to the placement and location of film within the cultural imagination of this century and the last. This book is a sustained, interdisciplinary perspective on memory and film from early cinema to the present. The first section examines the relationship between official and popular history and the constitution of memory narratives in and around the production and consumption of American cinema. The second section examines the politics of memory in a series of chapters that take as their focus three pivotal sites of national conflict in postwar America. This includes the war in Vietnam, American race relations and the Civil Rights Movement, and the history of marginality in the geographic and cultural borderlands of the US. The book explores the articulation of Vietnam. The final section concentrates on the issue of mediation; it explores how technological and semiotic shifts in the cultural terrain have influenced the coding and experience of memory in contemporary cinema. It considers both the presence of music and colour in nostalgia films of the 1990s and the impact of digital and video technologies on the representational determinants of mediated memory. The book also examines the stakes of cultural remembering in the United States and the means by which memory has been figured through Hollywood cinema.

Robert Burgoyne

Bernardo Bertolucci once said in an interview that the cinema ‘is the language through which reality expresses itself . . . to create the language of the cinema, more than with any other form of expression, you have first to put your camera in front of reality, because cinema is made of reality’. 1 He also said that every film is a documentary, including fiction films, for every film carries within

in Memory and popular film
The Pony Express at the Diamond Jubilee
Heidi Kenaga

), Paramount’s The Vanishing American (1925) and a Goldwyn production distributed by United Artists, The Winning of Barbara Worth (1926). Despite their popularity and central position in the studios’ production strategies during the mid-1920s, these movies remain underexamined in film studies literature. 3 George Fenin and William Everson, for example, argue that The Pony

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Film festivals and the revival of Classic Hollywood
Julian Stringer

Film Studies has to date paid too little attention to the role cultural institutions play in the transformation of cinema history into heritage. At the dawn of cinema’s second century, a range of organisational bodies – including museums and art galleries, the publicity and promotion industries, film journalism and publishing, as well as the academy – work to activate and commodify memory narratives

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Pleasantville and the textuality of media memory
Paul Grainge

When Ted Turner purchased MGM Entertainment in 1986, and then financed a plan to digitally colourise a series of black and white movies from the studio’s back catalogue, a beachhead of Hollywood directors, actors, film critics and cinematic guilds vociferously attacked the idea in practice and principle. The crux of complaint focused on the fact that, as a technical process

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
New retro movies in 1990s Hollywood cinema
Philip Drake

, memorialised past is increasingly dependent upon, and recycled within, audiovisual representations such as those found in popular film. My aim is to consider how 1990s Hollywood cinema has activated a selective, revised sense of the past, and how memory approaches to film history are able to analyse this. In particular, I will stress how popular cultural memory is drawn upon as an aesthetic and commercial strategy of Hollywood

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Memory and popular film
Paul Grainge

As a technology able to picture and embody the temporality of the past, cinema has become central to the mediation of memory in modern cultural life. While, in representational terms, the past has been figured in variations of the history film, the costume drama and the heritage picture from early cinema to the present, rituals of remembrance have come to surround the culture of film. Whether in the

in Memory and popular film
Sarah Easen

Director General of the Festival, Gerald Barry, promised ‘a year of fun, fantasy and colour’, an interlude of ‘fun and games’ after the long run of wartime austerity. 1 Film was integral to the Festival of Britain. It related to the Festival’s three main areas of concern, the arts, industry and science. Britain’s role in international film culture had already been established by the growth of the British

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
The ethics and politics of memory in an age of mass culture
Alison Landsberg

Memory is not commonly imagined as a site of possibility for progressive politics. More often, memory, particularly in the form of nostalgia, is condemned for its solipsistic nature, for its tendency to draw people into the past instead of the present. This is the case, for example, in Kathryn Bigelow’s 1995 film Strange Days , in which the use of memory – usually another

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
History, legend and memory in John Sayles’ Lone Star
Neil Campbell

’s badge buried in the desert. Their conversation jokily mentions the ‘Coronado Expedition’, locating the significance of colonial history to this film and suggesting its continued relevance to the present day lives of this border community; ‘This country’s seen a good few disagreements over the years’, we are told. Digging for relics of the past, to transform into art-objects of the future (the bullets

in Memory and popular film