Ernesto Schwartz-Marin and Arely Cruz-Santiago

The article will present the findings of ethnographic research into the Colombian and Mexican forensic systems, introducing the first citizen-led exhumation project made possible through the cooperation of scholars, forensic specialists and interested citizens in Mexico. The coupling evolution and mutual re-constitution of forensic science will be explored, including new forms of citizenship and nation building projects – all approached as lived experience – in two of Latin America‘s most complex contexts: organised crime and mass death.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Claudia Merli and Trudi Buck

This article considers the contexts and processes of forensic identification in 2004 post-tsunami Thailand as examples of identity politics. The presence of international forensic teams as carriers of diverse technical expertise overlapped with bureaucratic procedures put in place by the Thai government. The negotiation of unified forensic protocols and the production of estimates of identified nationals straddle biopolitics and thanatocracy. The immense identification task testified on the one hand to an effort to bring individual bodies back to mourning families and national soils, and on the other hand to determining collective ethnic and national bodies, making sense out of an inexorable and disordered dissolution of corporeal as well as political boundaries. Individual and national identities were the subject of competing efforts to bring order to,the chaos, reaffirming the cogency of the body politic by mapping national boundaries abroad. The overwhelming forensic effort required by the exceptional circumstances also brought forward the socio-economic and ethnic disparities of the victims, whose post-mortem treatment and identification traced an indelible divide between us and them.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
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2016 2 2 1 1 3 3 22 22 10.7227/HRV.2.1.2 Symbolically burying the six million: post-war soap burial in Romania, Bulgaria and Brazil Neander Joachim April 2016 2 2 1 1 23 23 40 40 10.7227/HRV.2.1.3 Microbial ecogenomics and forensic archaeology: new methods for investigating clandestine gravesites Ralebitso-Senior T.K. Thompson T

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1 1 1 1 Editorial Anstett Élisabeth Dreyfus Jean-Marc Fournet Caroline April 2015 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 10.7227/HRV.1.1.1 Forensic identification and identity politics in 2004 post-tsunami Thailand: Negotiating dissolving boundaries Merli Claudia Buck

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long story of the unidentified bodies found on the coastline of Uruguay during the Condor Plan Figueredo Magdalena Larrobla Fabiana October 2017 3 3 2 2 56 56 73 73 10.7227/HRV.3.2.5 Forensic investigation, truth and trust in the context of transitional justice in Brazil Guimarães Marco Aurelio Arrabaça Francisco

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.2.4 Forensic excavations and burials in Uruguay, 2004–10 López Mazz Jose October 2016 2 2 2 2 56 56 66 66 10.7227/HRV.2.2.5 Murderous returns: armed violence, suicide and exhumation in the Emberá Katío economy of death (Chocó and Antioquia, Colombia) Losonczy Anne Marie October 2016 2 2 2 2 67 67 83 83 10.7227/HRV.2.2.6 Book Reviews Corron

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5 5 1 1 Editorial Editorial April 2019 5 5 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 10.7227/HRV.5.1.1 Articles Discarding used organic samples in a forensic lab The manifold materialities of human remains Fonseca Claudia claudialwfonseca@gmail.com Grazinoli Garrido Rodrigo grazinoli.garrido@gmail.com April 2019

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Jewish cemetery at the Hôtel-Dieu in Lyon, France Gerstenkorn Jacques April 2017 3 3 1 1 22 22 36 36 10.7227/HRV.3.1.3 Procedural and political aspects of forensic exhumation in Brazil Guimarães Marco Aurelio Francisco Raffaela Arrabaça Evison Martin Iwamura

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walter.bruyere-ostells@sciencespo-aix.fr 10 2019 12 11 2019 5 5 2 2 3 3 16 16 2 10.7227/HRV.5.2.2 The work of transnational forensic medicine experts in colonised zones: the Palestinian case Daher-Nashif Suhad suhadh@hotmail.com; snashif@qu.edu.qa 10 2019 12 11 2019 5 5 2 2 17 17 33 33 3 10.7227/HRV.5.2.3 Fallen comrades? Anthropological analysis of

Jose López Mazz

This article will describe the contemporary scientific techniques used to excavate and identify the dead bodies of disappeared detainees from the Uruguayan dictatorship. It will highlight the developments that have led to increased success by forensic anthropologists and archaeologists in uncovering human remains, as well as their effects, both social and political, on promoting the right to the truth and mechanisms of transitional justice.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal