A Congolese Experience
Justine Brabant

Telegraph reporter and a regular in conflict zones ( Deedes, 2004 ). But another aspect of the Congolese context heightens this dependency: the number of armed groups in North and South Kivu and their fragmentation. The Kivu Security Tracker database, a website curated by researchers from the Congo Research Group (affiliated with the New York University Center on International Cooperation) and Human Rights Watch, lists 160 armed groups active in North and South Kivu provinces. 13 And though

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Ford Madox Ford, the novel and the Great War
Author: Sara Haslam

This book is about Ford Madox Ford, a hero of the modernist literary revolution. Ford is a fascinating and fundamental figure of the time; not only because, as a friend and critic of Ezra Pound and Joseph Conrad, editor of the English Review and author of The Good Soldier, he shaped the development of literary modernism. But, as the grandson of Ford Madox Brown and son of a German music critic, he also manifested formative links with mainland European culture and the visual arts. In Ford there is the chance to explore continuity in artistic life at the turn of the last century, as well as the more commonly identified pattern of crisis in the time. The argument throughout the book is that modernism possesses more than one face. Setting Ford in his cultural and historical context, the opening chapter debates the concept of fragmentation in modernism; later chapters discuss the notion of the personal narrative, and war writing. Ford's literary technique is studied comparatively and plot summaries of his major books (The Good Soldier and Parade's End) are provided, as is a brief biography.

Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

Introduction The title of this book, Fragmenting Modernism, describes my dual intention in relation to its subject: novelist, poet, editor and critic Ford Madox Ford.1 Isaiah Berlin writes in Four Essays on Liberty that ‘historians of ideas cannot avoid perceiving their material in terms of some kind of pattern’.2 Where modernism is credited with a pattern, and it usually is, it is more than likely that the concept of fragmentation is prominent in it.3 I put Ford in context in what follows, and this necessitates placing him in this movement, in which, as editor

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Aesthetics, fragmentation and community
Simon Malpas

5 Simon Malpas Touching art: aesthetics, fragmentation and community Art has hitherto been considered, in all possible ways, in terms of both ‘creation’ (poiesis, genius, and so on) and ‘reception’ (judgement, critique, and so on). But what is left in the shadows is its befalling or devolving, that is to say, also its chance, event, birth, or encounter – which, in other terminologies, has been called the ‘shock’, ‘touch’, ‘emotion’, or ‘pleasure’, and which participates indissociably in both ‘creation’ and ‘reception’.1 Throughout the history of literary and

in The new aestheticism
International, national and community integration
Iain Lindsey, Tess Kay, Ruth Jeanes, and Davies Banda

dependent on the establishment and development of partnerships with other organizations operating in local communities. The fragmentation and lack of co-ordination across the Zambian SfD sector that were identified in the previous chapter also suggest that attention to partnership working is pertinent. Partnership working has also been consistently prioritized in many of the documents that emerged from the UN interest in the field. The final report

in Localizing global sport for development
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

pursue them. Grimshaw’s ideas of civilised society, of received opinion, offer him safety from knowing his own fragmentation. But A Call ejects him from this safety zone. As it does so it evokes previously addressed issues in a concentrated context: the levels of narrative that reflect the plural truths of existence; the role of female sexuality in provoking them; the fragmenting qualities of sight in Ford’s modern world – particularly when related to psychology. Arthur Mizener claims that A Call ‘conveys feeling with a Jamesian minimum of dramatic gesture, the

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Neil McNaughton

Northern Ireland Office, headed by the Northern Ireland Secretary (the first being William Whitelaw). DIRECT RULE The period of direct rule from London lasted from 1972 until 1999 when devolved government took over in the province. For 27 years Northern Ireland suffered from violence, disruption, political initiatives bringing hope followed by disappointments, and renewed sectarian conflict. The story of direct rule is best divided into three themes – the course of sectarian violence, the fragmentation of the party system and the various attempts to find a lasting peace

in Understanding British and European political issues
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

1 The narrative push In this chapter the relationship between fragmentation, repression and writing will be explored. Some of the less obvious contributing factors for Ford’s first volume of autobiography (Ancient Lights) will also be examined. Close attention will be paid to the historical context that helped to produce Ancient Lights – discussed briefly in the Introduction and again in Chapter 5. Necessarily brief in its attention to some major issues (notably the First World War, addressed in Chapter 4), this is primarily a survey chapter that begins to

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Disability in working-class coalfields literature
Kirsti Bohata, Alexandra Jones, Mike Mantin, and Steven Thompson

fragmentation of the self and its challenge to totalising or linear narratives has been seen as pertinent to disability, while representation 224 DIS ABILITY IN INDU S TRIAL BRITAIN of disability demanded a reconsideration of form, voice and authenticity. Moreover, modernist representations of disability take nothing for granted. Ato Quayson, in his typology of disability in literature, has described ‘disability as enigma or hermeneutical impasse’,78 and this is foregrounded in modernist writing. In Bodies of Modernism, Marven Tova Linett characterises ‘modernism

in Disability in industrial Britain
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

large concepts. It is the big words that have ‘gone’. The ‘big words’ This expression of a wartime linguistic fragmentation is one for which I can find no etymological evidence (I have checked the Oxford English Dictionary and etymological dictionaries). And yet, it is one that is ubiquitous in certain kinds of writing of the First World War. Ezra Pound wrote in 1915, in structuralist vein, that ‘when words cease to cling close to things, kingdoms fall, empires wane and diminish’ In sight of war 85 (seemingly transposing cause and effect).3 Symbolising his

in Fragmenting modernism