The ambivalence of queer visibility in audio- visual archives

 175 10 NAMING, SHAMING, FRAMING? The ambivalence of queer visibility in audio-​visual archives* Dag m ar  Brunow T his chapter looks at the dynamics of visibility and vulnerability in audio-​ visual heritage. It analyses how film archives in Sweden and the UK, following their diversity policies, address and mobilise the notion of queer, recognising and making visible queer lives, history and cinema, and how they negotiate the risks of increased visibility. In this approach, the archive is positioned as an object of analysis, shifting the focus on the archive

in The power of vulnerability

October 2010. Innovation funds, innovation labs and innovation studies subsequently proliferated, and by 2016 innovation had become important enough to be adopted as one of the central themes of the World Humanitarian Summit. The ALNAP research specifically framed innovation as a response to external threats, stating that ‘[i]f established aid organisations fail to prioritise innovations, they are in danger of losing popular support and being overtaken by new types of relief organisations’ ( Ramalingam et

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts

knowledge gap regarding the development and deployment of wearables in emergencies, where there are deep, extra-democratic power differences between beneficiaries and structurally unaccountable humanitarian actors, donors and private-sector actors. This article suggests that humanitarian wearables have a structural dimension that risks being overlooked when the deployment of ‘wearables for good’ is framed as ‘technical’ and/or ‘good – rather than political. Most scholarship on

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Jr., and the 1965 Cambridge Debate

The 1965 debate at Cambridge University between James Baldwin and William F. Buckley, Jr., posed the question: “Has the American Dream been achieved at the Expense of the American Negro?” Within the contours of the debate, Baldwin and Buckley wrestled with the ghosts of settler colonialism and slavery in a nation founded on freedom and equality. Framing the debate within the longue durée, this essay examines the deep cultural currents related to the American racial paradox at the height of the Civil Rights movement. Underscoring the changing language of white resistance against black civil rights, the essay argues that the Baldwin and Buckley debate anticipated the ways the U.S. would address racial inequality in the aftermath of the civil rights era and the dawn of neoliberalism in the 1970s.

James Baldwin Review

In contemporary forensic medicine, in India, the label of complete autopsy applies to a whole range of post-mortem examinations which can present consid- erable differences in view of the intellectual resources, time, personnel and material means they involve. From various sources available in India and elsewhere, stems the idea that, whatever the type of case and its apparent obviousness, a complete autopsy implies opening the abdomen, the thorax and the skull and dissecting the organs they contain. Since the nineteenth century, procedural approaches of complete autopsies have competed with a practical sense of completeness which requires doctors to think their cases according to their history. Relying on two case studies observed in the frame of an ethnographic study of eleven months in medical colleges of North India, the article suggests that the practical completeness of autopsies is attained when all aspects of the history of the case are made sense of with regard to the observation of the body. Whereas certain autopsies are considered obvious and imply a reduced amount of time in the autopsy room, certain others imply successive redefinitions of what complete implies and the realisation of certain actions which would not have been performed otherwise.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal

Last year, in the dispatch “There Is No Texting at James Baldwin’s Table,” I began to assess the ways in which audiences were engaging with Baldwin’s writing at several public discussions that I co-facilitated with NYC actor/comedian Grant Cooper. Based on the initial reaction to two five-part Baldwin conversations at a high school and middle school in Manhattan, I posited that a need for meaningful communion is drawing people to discuss the writer. As I wrote that article, I was busy scheduling seven new Baldwin discussions in communities across New Jersey and another five-part series in Manhattan. Having completed those sessions, I am pleased to report that Baldwin’s welcome table is indeed a powerful vehicle for engaging in impactful dialogue. This dispatch will demonstrate that discussing Baldwin not only opened an avenue for productive sharing but went further by inspiring people to ask how they could contribute to hastening positive social and personal transformation. Three questions will frame this analysis of putting the welcome table into practice: How many people want to sit at James Baldwin’s table? Can conversations about James Baldwin sustain more “welcome table moments”? Can these interactions create a sense of kinship that deepens personal interaction in the digital age?

James Baldwin Review
An Interview with Celso Amorim, Former Brazilian Foreign Minister

protagonism in multilateral negotiations. He is convinced that the country will fulfil its potential as a major global power that can influence other states with a democratic and egalitarian vision. But he also recognises challenges ahead. A framed photo of Amorim and Lula perched on the top shelf of an eclectic bookcase, both men smiling widely. The following day, Amorim would travel to the southern Brazilian city of Curitiba, where he would visit Lula in prison. And he would receive news of a declaration by the UN Committee on Human Rights that the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

News and the Humanitarian Narrative ’, Journalism Studies , 1 : 1 , 129 – 43 . Tucher , A. ( 1994 ), Froth and Scum: Truth, Beauty, Goodness, and the Ax Murder in America’s First Mass Medium ( Chapel Hill, NC : University of North Carolina Press ). Twomey , C. ( 2015 ), ‘ Framing Atrocity ’, in Fehrenbach , H. and Rodogno , D. (eds), Humanitarian Photography: A History ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press ), pp. 47 – 63 . Tworek , H. and Hamilton , J. M

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector

Frontières (MSF), the agency with témoignage at the heart of its mandate, the role of public statements has been contested among the senior management, and MSF mostly undertakes its medical work without making public statements about abuses in its zones of operations ( Weissman, 2011 ). Both the ICRC and MSF have also run global campaigns concerned with attacks on medical missions and healthcare facilities. 2 While framed

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Interpreting Violence on Healthcare in the Early Stage of the South Sudanese Civil War

extension of the violence enacted in a wider frame’ ( Benton and Atshan, 2016 : 155). Hence the need to better document, as this article has sought to do, the ways in which forms of care may still be delivered when a hospital comes under attack and international medical support must find its way from a distance. Notes 1 The authors would like to express their gratitude to all South Sudanese staff and residents who shared their experiences and views, as well as to all MSF

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs