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The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction

3 Gothic geographies: the cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction Theodore Melville's The White Knight, or the monastery of Morne (1802) provides both a useful instance of the convergence of regional, national, and gothic literary forms considered in Chapter 2 and a helpful starting point with which to discuss the geographic settings of Romantic-era Irish gothic literature. Published just two years after Castle Rackrent (1800), The White Knight presents itself as a quasi-historical account of Irish antiquity and is set

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
The Experience of Dislocated Listening

“It is only in his music [. . .] that the Negro in America has been able to tell his story. It is a story which otherwise has yet to be told and which no American is prepared to hear,” so wrote James Baldwin in “Many Thousands Gone.” Throughout his career, James Baldwin returned to this incomprehension of African-American experience. He continually privileged music in his literature, crafting his own literary blues to address it. Baldwin’s blues resonated even more powerfully and painfully for its emotional and geographical dislocation. In this article, Rashida K. Braggs argues that it was the combination of music, word, and migration that prompted Baldwin’s own deeper understanding. Exploring her term dislocated listening, Braggs investigates how listening to music while willfully dislocated from one’s cultural home prompts a deeper understanding of African-American experience. The distance disconcerts, leaving one more vulnerable, while music impels the reader, audience, and even Baldwin to identify with some harsh realities of African-American experience. Baldwin evokes the experience of dislocated listening in his life and in “Sonny’s Blues.” Braggs also creates an experience of dislocated listening through her video performance of Baldwin’s words, thus attempting to draw the reader as well into a more attuned understanding of African-American experience.

James Baldwin Review
James Baldwin’s American South

James Baldwin has frequently been written about in terms of his relationship to geographical locations such as Harlem, Paris, St. Paul-de-Vence, Istanbul, and “the transatlantic,” but his longstanding connection to the American South, a region that served as a vexed and ambiguous spiritual battleground for him throughout his life and career, has been little discussed, even though Baldwin referred to himself as “in all but no technical legal fact, a Southerner.” This article argues that the South has been seriously underconsidered as a major factor in Baldwin’s psyche and career and that were it not for the challenge to witness the Southern Civil Rights movement made to Baldwin in the late 1950s, he might never have left Paris and become the writer and thinker into which he developed. It closely examines Baldwin’s fictional and nonfictional engagements with the American South during two distinct periods of his career, from his first visit to the region in 1957 through the watershed year of 1963, and from 1963 through the publication of Baldwin’s retrospective memoir No Name in the Street in 1972, and it charts Baldwin’s complex and often contradictory negotiations with the construction of identity in white and black Southerners and the South’s tendency to deny and censor its historical legacy of racial violence. A few years before his death, Baldwin wrote that “[t]he spirit of the South is the spirit of America,” and this essay investigates how the essential question he asked about the region—whether it’s a bellwether for America’s moral redemption or moral decline—remains a dangerous and open one.

James Baldwin Review
A Model for Historical Reflection in the Humanitarian Sector

to cover (see above). This geographical focus had several additional advantages which became apparent in the course of the project. In particular, it facilitated participation from individuals with a range of different areas of knowledge: practitioner and academic, humanitarian, developmental, security and rights-focused, and the Somali diaspora in Ireland. The potential pitfalls of a discussion ranging over twenty-five years of history are obvious: topics risk being conflated, debates lose focus and tangible lessons become an increasingly elusive prospect

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
An Interview with Celso Amorim, Former Brazilian Foreign Minister

exaggeration, but Brazil is generally well received in Africa. So we have potential to make a positive contribution – more than many other countries. We don’t face any serious external threats. India, for example, has an ongoing conflict with Pakistan, and it has had confrontations with China. South Africa doesn’t have the size, nor is it well located geographically. There is going to be a seminar on democracy in the coming weeks, motivated by Lula’s situation. The seminar was the suggestion of Dominique de Villepin, who was French foreign minister and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

secondary to these paradigmatic changes. Things like privacy can be addressed. Changes in the way the world is understood, experienced and interrogated represent a greater political and existential challenge. 2 For an excellent periodisation, see Brown (2018) . 3 The terms global North and South are used here figuratively. Loosely associated with modernist distinctions between developed and underdeveloped countries, they no longer imply any fixed geographical or social homogeneity. Their use, however, serves to retain the sense of historic

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Heterogeneous temporalities, algorithmic frames and subjective time in geomedia

-dimensional inscriptions out of accumulated scientific facts by translating aspects of the three-dimensional and dynamically changing (geographic) world onto a flat and static surface. Therefore, only through fixation can knowledge be stabilised and safely brought back from distant places to central agencies Latour calls ‘centers of calculation’ (Latour, 1987: 215). Because knowledge accumulation demands an immutability of the sign plate, fixed maps have been mobile and thus time-critical, merely in the sense of circulation as an artefact. One consequence of this mismatch between

in Time for mapping
Considerations and consequences

8 Mapping the space of flows: considerations and consequences Thomas Sutherland For many years now, scholars in geography, as well as other areas of the social sciences, have mounted a sustained challenge to the traditional theorisations of mapping which, in the words of Nigel Thrift (1996: 7), ‘claim to re-present some naturally present reality’. There is, as such, little need to further rehearse such debates.1 At the same time though, what we do need is greater theoretical intervention into the practices of representation that are inherent within mapping, and

in Time for mapping
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Politics of movement

This book brings together a number of contributions that look into the political regulation of movement and analyses that engage the material enablers of and constraints on such movement. It attempts to bridge theoretical perspectives from critical security studies and political geography in order to provide a more comprehensive perspective on security and mobility. In this vein, the book brings together approaches to mobility that take into account both techniques and practices of regulating movement, as well as their underlying infrastructures. Together the contributions inquire into a politics of movement that lies at the core of the production of security. Drawing on the insight that security is a contingent concept that hinges on the social construction of threat – which in turn must be understood through its political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions – the contributors offer fine-grained perspectives on a presumably mobile and insecure world. The title of the book, Security/Mobility, is a direct reference to this world that at times appears dominated by these two paradigms. As is shown throughout the book, rather than being opposed to each other, a great deal of political effort is undertaken in order to reconcile the need for security and the necessity of mobility. Running through the book is the view that security and mobility are entangled in a constant dynamic – a dynamic that converges in what is conceptualised here as a politics of movement.

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Power in cross-border Cooperation

The volume explores a question that sheds light on the contested, but largely cooperative, nature of Arctic governance in the post-Cold War period: How do power relations matter – and how have they mattered – in shaping cross-border cooperation and diplomacy in the Arctic? Through carefully selected case studies – from Russia’s role in the Arctic Council to the diplomacy of indigenous peoples’ organisations – this book seeks to shed light on how power performances are enacted constantly to shore up Arctic cooperation in key ways. The conceptually driven nature of the enquiry makes the book appropriate reading for courses in international relations and political geography, while the carefully selected case studies lend themselves to courses on Arctic politics.