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Diverse voices

This book focuses on the drama and poetry published since 1990. It also reflects upon related forms of creative work in this period, including film and the visual and performing arts. The book discusses some of the most topical issues which have emerged in Irish theatre since 1990. It traces the significance of the home in the poetry of Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin and Vona Groarke. The book also focuses on the reconfigurations of identity, and the complex intersections of nationality, gender and race in contemporary Ireland. It shows how Roddy Doyle's return to the repressed gives articulation to those left behind by globalisation. The book then examines the ways in which post-Agreement Northern fiction negotiates its bitter legacies. It also examines how the activity of creating art in a time of violence brings about an anxiety regarding the artist's role, and how it calls into question the ability to re-present atrocity. The book further explores the consideration of politics and ethics in Irish drama since 1990. It talks about the swirling abundance of themes and trends in contemporary Irish fiction and autobiography. The book shows that writing in the Irish Republic and in the North has begun to accommodate an increasing diversity of voices which address themselves not only to issues preoccupying their local audiences, but also to wider geopolitical concerns.

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The Republic and Northern Ireland since 1990

Irish Republic and in the North has begun to accommodate an increasing diversity of voices which address themselves not only to issues preoccupying their local audiences, but also to wider geopolitical concerns, particularly since 11 September 2001 and the outbreak of the war in Iraq in 2003. One of many manifestations of this growing global consciousness was an anthology entitled Irish Writers Against War, published by Conor Kostick and Katherine Moore, which brought together writers from both sides of the border to deprecate the proposed invasion as ‘not

in Irish literature since 1990

often the least likely to have a voice in public science or education policy. Moreover, they are seldom seen as an important or primary audience for science communication initiatives. Lumping together these important – yet often complex and nuanced – moral, social, political and geopolitical concerns with what are caricatured as extreme fundamentalist religious positions inhibits us from building a better understanding of what might be at play when people say they reject evolution. Little or no data have been systematically collected across publics to discern how

in Science and the politics of openness
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New generation Northern Irish poets (Sinéad Morrissey and Nick Laird)

Guinness, are a postmodernist distrust of grand narratives, an alertness to wider geopolitical concerns, and a preoccupation with domestic and family, rather than national history. For Brown, whose focus is exclusively on Northern poetry, the coming poetic generation displays a high degree of mobility and disparity in their work, a determination to cross borders, break silences and proffer ‘bifocal or comparative visions’ (p. 12) of changing private and public terrain. While not wishing to question the validity of these assertions in relation to a substantial number of

in Irish literature since 1990
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governments seemingly unprepared to face even the possibility of a serious conflict between self-determination and integration. As was the case with Portugal, key decisions seem to have been made and attitudes formed in a haze of ambiguity. Official statements indicate a kind of wishful thinking that geopolitical concerns and obligations to support aspirations for self-determination would happily coincide. The Australian Government’s position on East Timor is instructive here. The approach was to hope for no inconvenience – for all the desired outcomes: regional stability

in Human rights and the borders of suffering