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Medicine and culture in the nineteenth century

This collaborative volume explores changing perceptions of health and disease in the context of the burgeoning global modernities of the long nineteenth century. During this period, popular and medical understandings of the mind and body were challenged, modified, and reframed by the politics and structures of ‘modern life’, understood in industrial, social, commercial, and technological terms. Bringing together work by leading international scholars, this volume demonstrates how a multiplicity of medical practices were organised around new and evolving definitions of the modern self. The study offers varying and culturally specific definitions of what constituted medical modernity for practitioners around the world in this period. Chapters examine the ways in which cancer, suicide, and social degeneration were seen as products of the stresses and strains of ‘new’ ways of living in the nineteenth century, and explore the legal, institutional, and intellectual changes that contributed to both positive and negative understandings of modern medical practice. The volume traces the ways in which physiological and psychological problems were being constituted in relation to each other, and to their social contexts, and offers new ways of contextualising the problems of modernity facing us in the twenty-first century.

Open Access (free)
The Australian and New Zealand repertoires and fortunes of North American performers Margaret Anglin, Katherine Grey and Muriel Starr

version of The Man Who Came Back.1 But by this decade’s end, Starr’s popular dramatic vehicles were in a neck-and-neck race with the exhibition of their screen versions, with both frequently playing the same centre simultaneously, and the time gap becoming generally ever narrower. As professional workers within global modernity, stage actors are significant coalmine canaries for mapping economic crises and disruptions, and revolutions in the generative practices of creation, mediation and distribution. In 1908 the popular and accomplished ‘empire actor’ George

in Stage women, 1900–50

, whether as processes (as Elias and other processual theorists would have it), as collective representations (for Durkheim) or as active ontologies (Eisenstadt). Civilisations persist residually as powerful historical presences, but do not contribute to the main energies of the world. One further sociologist of civilisations and globalisation extends Therborn’s approach, but casts civilisations as contemporary forces in global modernity. José Mauricio Domingues brings a multidimensional and nuanced account of global modernity from within contemporary critical theory. He

in Debating civilisations
Dr Williams’ Pink Pills for Pale People and the hybrid pathways of Chinese modernity

West. The forgotten Chinese afterlife of this derided patent pills opens up an alternate version of global modernity that develops along hybrid cultural and temporal pathways. Beyond calling into question the sequential connotations implicit in the language of modernity, the deeply site-specific sense of the modern self that emerges in this case study of early twentieth-century China suggests the need to decentralise the role of the West in the historical narrative of modernity. One localised modernity implies the existence of others, each unique in its configuration

in Progress and pathology
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Security/ Mobility and politics of movement

M OBILITY TODAY is regarded as both a condition of global modernity and as a source of insecurity. Not only are people on the move every day and on an unprecedented scale, but also a multiplicity of non-humans move and are being moved. Indeed, ‘from SARS and avian influenza to train crashes, from airport expansion controversies to controlling global warming, from urban congestion charging to

in Security/ Mobility

model of global modernity while recognising real variation (Domingues, 2012). Eisenstadt’s perspective is distinguished in this field of unfolding pluralities by the manner in which he delimits the number of modernities by the cultural ontologies of many civilisations. For Eisenstadt, if there is a special source of cultural ontologies, it is the world religions. In other words, his answer to the question of ‘how many modernities?’ is that the world religions define the number of cultural ontologies, thereby demarcating the multiple modernities. As multiple

in Debating civilisations
Time and space in family migrant networks between Kosovo and western Europe

, the tight jeans and shirts which could be bought in the flourishing sector of Western-style shops in nearby towns, or which had been brought as presents by visiting migrants. Villagers could now keep in daily contact with those abroad by using Skype, Facebook or Messenger (see Levitt 1998; Peleikis 2003; Appadurai 2004; Leutloff-Grandits and Pichler 2014). Middle-aged migrants living abroad met these changes with astonishment and criticism. Instead of celebrating the fact that villages were ‘catching up’ with what could be termed ‘global modernity’, they expressed a

in Migrating borders and moving times
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Surveillance and transgender bodies in a post-9/ 11 era of neoliberalism

that purport to be more ‘inclusive’. Mobility is, as the contributions in this volume make clear, never an innocent enterprise and is always implicated in the production of power (Cresswell 2010 : 20–1). While recent conceptualisations of mobility, as both a condition of global modernity and a source of insecurity, can be traced back to the work of Michel Foucault ( 2007 ), it is also

in Security/ Mobility
Open Access (free)

disease in the context of burgeoning global modernities of the long nineteenth century. The concept of ‘modernity’, often defined exclusively by its Western or European model, is of course a relative term, often predicated on a break with the past across social, cultural, political, and economic institutions, and conferred by historians as a means of determining major shifts in orientation. 20 L. S. Jacyna, in his recent work on medicine and modernism, contends that historians have typically employed this term in such a

in Progress and pathology
Open Access (free)
Education and development in modern Southeast Asian history

English for the secondary school. It was deeply rooted in a Javanese context, yet led by individuals deeply aware of the challenges of a global modernity into which they had been thrust irrevocably by colonial rule. So much of the history-writing in Southeast Asia, a region where nationalist master-narratives have held so much sway in shaping perceptions of the past, lies in recovering its rich intellectual resources, of which Ki Hajar Dewantara is just one embodiment. Education in Southeast Asia remains imbricated in deep historical patterns. Yet policy debate largely

in History, historians and development policy