By expanding the geographical scope of the history of violence and war, this volume challenges both Western and state-centric narratives of the decline of violence and its relationship to modernity. It highlights instead similarities across early modernity in terms of representations, legitimations, applications of, and motivations for violence. It seeks to integrate methodologies of the study of violence into the history of war, thereby extending the historical significance of both fields of research. Thirteen case studies outline the myriad ways in which large-scale violence was understood and used by states and non-state actors throughout the early modern period across Africa, Asia, the Americas, the Atlantic, and Europe, demonstrating that it was far more complex than would be suggested by simple narratives of conquest and resistance. Moreover, key features of imperial violence apply equally to large-scale violence within societies. As the authors argue, violence was a continuum, ranging from small-scale, local actions to full-blown war. The latter was privileged legally and increasingly associated with states during early modernity, but its legitimacy was frequently contested and many of its violent forms, such as raiding and destruction of buildings and crops, could be found in activities not officially classed as war.

Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa

enslavement are but two means through which Europeans made themselves the protagonists of global history. Europeans then rewrote their history, erasing the mass human suffering they had caused, promoting instead tales of white European innocence ( Wekker, 2016 ), superiority and exceptionalism. In its destruction of life, coloniality might be considered anti-humanitarian, and yet it is characteristic of the liberal humanitarianism whose end we now (prematurely) are invited to mourn. For over two decades, I have been struggling to make sense of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Model for Historical Reflection in the Humanitarian Sector
Kevin O’Sullivan
and
Réiseal Ní Chéilleachair

of the twenty-first century, typified by the Overseas Development Institute’s five-year ‘Global History of Modern Humanitarian Action’ project (2011–15), Médecins sans Frontières’ Speaking Out initiative ( Médecins sans Frontières, n.d. ), its recently released associative history ( Médecins sans Frontières, 2018 ) and the 2015 conference on the fundamental principles in ‘a critical historical perspective’, hosted by the International Committee of the Red Cross

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Focus on Community Engagement
Frédéric Le Marcis
,
Luisa Enria
,
Sharon Abramowitz
,
Almudena-Mari Saez
, and
Sylvain Landry B. Faye

of conflict and instability, weak health sectors and economies and an eroded social contract set the foundations for the crisis of 2014. The place of these countries in global history and contemporary dependencies was re-inscribed in the nature of the response. Under the PHEIC (Public Health Emergency of International Concern) declared by the World Health Assembly on 8 August 2014, it was conducted through a joint partnership between the international community and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Violence and the early modern world
Erica Charters
,
Marie Houllemare
, and
Peter H. Wilson

the study of violence into the history of war, thereby extending the historical significance of both areas of study.2 Likewise, by expanding the geographical scope of the history of violence and war, this volume challenges both Western and state-centric narratives of the decline of violence and its relationship to modernity, highlighting instead similarities across 2 A global history of early modern violence early modernity in terms of representations, legitimations, applications of, and motivations for, violence. Instead of a global synthesis, this volume

in A global history of early modern violence
Dr Williams’ Pink Pills for Pale People and the hybrid pathways of Chinese modernity
Alice Tsay

publication thereafter. Spanish-language advertisements appeared on a greater scale around the turn of the century in a few South American publications, such as El Comercio in Peru and Mercurio de Valparaiso in Chile, but still in relatively limited numbers. 27 In comparison, as will be further discussed, the marketing of the pills in China established a scale of distribution and level of cultural tailoring that made it unique even within the global history of the company. The

in Progress and pathology
Postsocialist, post-conflict, postcolonial?
Author:

This book explains theoretical work in postcolonial and postsocialist studies to offer a novel and distinctive insight into how Yugoslavia is configured by, and through, race. It presents the history of how ideas of racialised difference have been translated globally in Yugoslavia. The book provides a discussion on the critical race scholarship, global historical sociologies of 'race in translation' and south-east European cultural critique to show that the Yugoslav region is deeply embedded in global formations of race. It considers the geopolitical imagination of popular culture; the history of ethnicity; and transnational formations of race before and during state socialism, including the Non-Aligned Movement. The book also considers the post-Yugoslav discourses of security, migration, terrorism and international intervention, including the War on Terror and the refugee crisis. It elaborates how often-neglected aspects of the history of nationhood and migration reveal connections that tie the region into the global history of race. The book also explains the linkage between ethnic exclusivism and territory in the ethnopolitical logic of the Bosnian conflict and in the internationally mediated peace agreements that enshrined it: 'apartheid cartography'. Race and whiteness remained perceptible in post-war Bosnian identity discourses as new, open-ended forms of post-conflict international intervention developed.

Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?
Catherine Baker

making sense of ex-Yugoslavia, ‘the Balkans’ and ‘eastern Europe’ has been inspiring reinterpretations of the region's transnational and global history that multiplied even as this book was being written, it is no longer possible – and never should have been – to contend that the Yugoslav region stands somehow ‘outside’ race. The question is where it stands, and why that has gone unspoken for so long. My own research has reproduced this disregard for race, a sense that race was not something south-east European studies ‘needed to know’. In 2006 or

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
Rima D. Apple

reality of nursing in colonial and post-colonial settings. They are an important opening for the study of nursing and the study of healthcare provision in imperial projects. Most significantly, they stimulate under-researched issues and broaden our perspective on these vital components of global history. 236

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
Settler emigration, the voyage out, and shipboard literary production
Fariha Shaikh

they take: attending to the materials of which they are comprised, the cargo that they carry, and the labour required to make them and that they transport are often just as important in untangling the colonial connections they embody. 26 Despite their ‘centrality’ to ‘“globalhistory’, ‘ships as arenas in their own right have often remained beyond the global historian’s gaze’. 27 In the nineteenth-century cultural imagination, however, they were an embodiment of an ‘imperial maritime rhetoric’ which symbolised power, where the ship’s ‘alleged capacity to overawe

in Worlding the south