Open Access (free)
Power in cross-border Cooperation

The volume explores a question that sheds light on the contested, but largely cooperative, nature of Arctic governance in the post-Cold War period: How do power relations matter – and how have they mattered – in shaping cross-border cooperation and diplomacy in the Arctic? Through carefully selected case studies – from Russia’s role in the Arctic Council to the diplomacy of indigenous peoples’ organisations – this book seeks to shed light on how power performances are enacted constantly to shore up Arctic cooperation in key ways. The conceptually driven nature of the enquiry makes the book appropriate reading for courses in international relations and political geography, while the carefully selected case studies lend themselves to courses on Arctic politics.

Straddling the fence

Sweden is seen as a forerunner in environmental and ecological policy. This book is about policies and strategies for ecologically rational governance, and uses the Swedish case study to ask whether or not it is possible to move from a traditional environmental policy to a broad, integrated pursuit of sustainable development, as illustrated through the ‘Sustainable Sweden’ programme. It begins by looking at the spatial dimensions of ecological governance, and goes on to consider the integration and effectiveness of sustainable development policies. The book analyses the tension between democracy and sustainable development, which has a broader relevance beyond the Swedish model, to other nation states as well as the European Union as a whole. It offers the latest word in advanced implementation of sustainable development.

2579Ch2 12/8/03 11:47 AM Page 25 2 ‘Nested enterprises’? Spatial dimensions of ecological governance Do the twain ever meet? ‘Natural’ and ‘man-made’ systems and the problem of scale The nature–society interface: different scales, problems of fit, and nestedness Space is of central concern to rational ecological governance. Environmental problems and resource management issues cross the man-made scales of local, regional or national governments. The question thus becomes how ‘to negotiate a better fit’ in responding to very complex ecological challenges

in Sweden and ecological governance

2579Ch6 12/8/03 11:55 AM Page 148 6 Democracy and ecological governance – a balancing act Sustainability and democracy: a political dilemma Legitimising the balance between sustainability and autonomy; the need for democratic politics As pointed out in Chapter 1, this book builds on the normative argument that ecologically rational governance must strive for sustainability within the limits set by democracy and individual autonomy. The relationship among these values is quite complex. On the one hand, effective and in the longer term successful ecological

in Sweden and ecological governance

2579Ch5 12/8/03 11:54 AM Page 117 5 Governing in common – integration and effectiveness in ecological governance Specialisation or integration. Organising principles of ecological governance for sustainability From environment to sustainable development; the quest for effectiveness and integration The first decades of environmental policy in Sweden were characterised by an amalgamation of different governmental units dealing with aspects of the environmental issue into a recognisable sectoral policy domain. This was how SEPA came to be a specialised agency

in Sweden and ecological governance

2579Ch3 12/8/03 11:47 AM Page 54 3 Up or down with the ecology cycle? Strategies for temporally rational ecological governance Political terms and ecological cycles Next budget and next election; dominant time spans in politics From the early nineteenth century onwards, the dominant political view of time was one of continuous ‘progress’ with the state at the centre of change (Ekengren 1998:30). This linear conception of time is, however, just one possible view. Political time can also be seen as (series of) distinct events or as connected points that have

in Sweden and ecological governance

5 Non-​state actors and the quest for authority in Arctic governance The modern state, as discussed in Chapter 1, can be considered a relative newcomer to the cross-​border politics of the Arctic region. However, states have featured prominently in the preceding two chapters. We have come to see how advantageous positions earned by/​granted to states vis-​à-​vis other states matter for shaping the rules of the road in Arctic cooperative governance –​and ultimately shape outcomes. In this chapter, I seek to broaden the net to explore the positions of key non

in Arctic governance
New stories on rafted ice

environmental awareness (Epstein, 2008). This book is designed to give us insight into how power relations have been important to structuring and sustaining cross-​border Arctic cooperation and cooperative governance of the region. Taking a close look at power necessitates jostling and unpacking established narratives about regional history and key actors. This chapter, however, aims to provide readers less familiar with Arctic settings with important19background 20 Arctic governance and, therefore, draws upon established narratives and classifications that later chapters

in Arctic governance

norms exert influence over behaviour in cross-​border relations requires reconceptualising the space of global governance as more than a dynamic, inclusive, vast network of governance. Rather, we need to consider how delimited and ‘local’ the meeting places of cross-​border politics –​what we can term global governance policy fields –​frequently become. 83 84 Arctic governance This chapter examines Russia’s engagement in the Arctic Council over time to see how its preferences are met (or not), and discusses what this can tell us about the rules of the road in

in Arctic governance
Open Access (free)
Theorising Arctic hierarchies

the changing nature of the post-​Cold War international system (multipolar, concentric, anarchic) and the jumbled and untidy geopolitical imaginings of a new, arguably more chaotic, world order. As discussed in Chapter 1, Arctic governance is marked by a number of initiatives that have been initially promoted by ‘non-​great-​power’ states in the international system (or indeed by indigenous peoples’ 58 Theorising Arctic hierarchies     59 organisations, NGOs and other sectors of civil society). These include ‘the Finnish Initiative’, which became the AEPS

in Arctic governance