Open Access (free)
Power in cross-border Cooperation

The volume explores a question that sheds light on the contested, but largely cooperative, nature of Arctic governance in the post-Cold War period: How do power relations matter – and how have they mattered – in shaping cross-border cooperation and diplomacy in the Arctic? Through carefully selected case studies – from Russia’s role in the Arctic Council to the diplomacy of indigenous peoples’ organisations – this book seeks to shed light on how power performances are enacted constantly to shore up Arctic cooperation in key ways. The conceptually driven nature of the enquiry makes the book appropriate reading for courses in international relations and political geography, while the carefully selected case studies lend themselves to courses on Arctic politics.

Straddling the fence

Sweden is seen as a forerunner in environmental and ecological policy. This book is about policies and strategies for ecologically rational governance, and uses the Swedish case study to ask whether or not it is possible to move from a traditional environmental policy to a broad, integrated pursuit of sustainable development, as illustrated through the ‘Sustainable Sweden’ programme. It begins by looking at the spatial dimensions of ecological governance, and goes on to consider the integration and effectiveness of sustainable development policies. The book analyses the tension between democracy and sustainable development, which has a broader relevance beyond the Swedish model, to other nation states as well as the European Union as a whole. It offers the latest word in advanced implementation of sustainable development.

New threats, institutional adaptations
James Sperling

2504Introduction 7/4/03 12:37 pm Page 3 1 Eurasian security governance: new threats, institutional adaptations James Sperling Halford Mackinder developed the geostrategic formulation recognising that international politics encompasses the globe. His simple formulation, which guided early twentieth-century policy-makers and theorists in North America and continental Europe alike, held that the state that controls the Eurasian heartland controls the periphery, and the state that controls the periphery controls the world.1 More so than in the first decade of

in Limiting institutions?
Corporations, Celebrities and the Construction of the Entrepreneurial Refugee Woman
Annika Bergman Rosamond and Catia Gregoratti

, suggests that the promotion of self-reliance through vocational training and entrepreneurship programmes has become the new neoliberal mantra also among refugee-supporting agencies, policymakers and different humanitarian actors ( Easton-Calabria and Omata, 2018 ; Turner, 2019 ; Richey and Brockington, 2020 ). Yet, little attention has been devoted to exploring how the discourse of entrepreneurship is mobilised for the presumed benefit of refugee women in the realm of humanitarian governance, here

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Lennart J. Lundqvist

2579Ch2 12/8/03 11:47 AM Page 25 2 ‘Nested enterprises’? Spatial dimensions of ecological governance Do the twain ever meet? ‘Natural’ and ‘man-made’ systems and the problem of scale The nature–society interface: different scales, problems of fit, and nestedness Space is of central concern to rational ecological governance. Environmental problems and resource management issues cross the man-made scales of local, regional or national governments. The question thus becomes how ‘to negotiate a better fit’ in responding to very complex ecological challenges

in Sweden and ecological governance
Lennart J. Lundqvist

2579Ch6 12/8/03 11:55 AM Page 148 6 Democracy and ecological governance – a balancing act Sustainability and democracy: a political dilemma Legitimising the balance between sustainability and autonomy; the need for democratic politics As pointed out in Chapter 1, this book builds on the normative argument that ecologically rational governance must strive for sustainability within the limits set by democracy and individual autonomy. The relationship among these values is quite complex. On the one hand, effective and in the longer term successful ecological

in Sweden and ecological governance
Joy Molina Mirasol, Felix S. Mirasol, Estela C. Itaas Jr., and Benjamin Maputi

12 Enhancing local policymakers’ capacity in environmental governance in the Philippines Joy Molina Mirasol, Felix S. Mirasol, Jr., Estela C. Itaas and Benjamin Maputi Context The forest land in the province of Bukidnon, Philippines, is continuously declining in terms of its economic and environmental capacity. Forest destruction by timber poachers and conversion of forest land for agriculture are rising to an alarming level, leaving the remaining forest cover significantly below the desired 45 percent cover to sustain its services. Such decline and

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Lennart J. Lundqvist

2579Ch5 12/8/03 11:54 AM Page 117 5 Governing in common – integration and effectiveness in ecological governance Specialisation or integration. Organising principles of ecological governance for sustainability From environment to sustainable development; the quest for effectiveness and integration The first decades of environmental policy in Sweden were characterised by an amalgamation of different governmental units dealing with aspects of the environmental issue into a recognisable sectoral policy domain. This was how SEPA came to be a specialised agency

in Sweden and ecological governance
Brendan T. Lawson

other three books, are accompanied by a set of recent journal articles that provide a lively and insightful set of discussions ( Dijkzeul et al. , 2013 ; Fast and Waugaman, 2016 ; Beerli, 2017a ; Dijkzeul and Sandvik, 2019 ; Jacobsen and Fast, 2019 ; Lokot, 2019 ). To provide an overview of this literature, this review outlines four broad strands of quantification and humanitarianism: knowledge production, humanitarian governance, effects on the humanitarian sector and meaning

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs is an exciting, new open access journal hosted jointly by The Humanitarian Affairs Team at Save the Children UK, and Centre de Réflexion sur l’Action et les Savoirs Humanitaires MSF (Paris) and the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute at the University of Manchester. It will contribute to current thinking around humanitarian governance, policy and practice with academic rigour and political courage. The journal will challenge contributors and readers to think critically about humanitarian issues that are often approached from reductionist assumptions about what experience and evidence mean. It will cover contemporary, historical, methodological and applied subject matters and will bring together studies, debates and literature reviews. The journal will engage with these through diverse online content, including peer reviewed articles, expert interviews, policy analyses, literature reviews and ‘spotlight’ features.

Our rationale can be summed up as follows: the sector is growing and is facing severe ethical and practical challenges. The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs will provide a space for serious and inter-disciplinary academic and practitioner exchanges on pressing issues of international interest.

The journal aims to be a home and platform for leading thinkers on humanitarian affairs, a place where ideas are floated, controversies are aired and new research is published and scrutinised. Areas in which submissions will be considered include humanitarian financing, migrations and responses, the history of humanitarian aid, failed humanitarian interventions, media representations of humanitarianism, the changing landscape of humanitarianism, the response of states to foreign interventions and critical debates on concepts such as resilience or security.