Nazima Kadir

authority entails the double process of an individual demonstrating a set of competencies and being recognized by others as a figure of authority through a vicious and dismantling discourse. The first section of this chapter focuses mainly on the types of skills, competencies, habitus, and performances that constitute authority. The second part concentrates on how squatters distinguish authority figures by eviscerating the individuals in question through gossip, and examines the significance of the attention that is

in The autonomous life?
Open Access (free)
Paradoxes of hierarchy and authority in the squatters movement in Amsterdam
Author: Nazima Kadir

This book is an ethnographic study of the internal dynamics of a subcultural community that defines itself as a social movement. While the majority of scholarly studies on this movement focus on its official face, on its front stage, this book concerns itself with the ideological and practical paradoxes at work within the micro-social dynamics of the backstage, an area that has so far been neglected in social movement studies. The central question is how hierarchy and authority function in a social movement subculture that disavows such concepts. The squatters’ movement, which defines itself primarily as anti-hierarchical and anti-authoritarian, is profoundly structured by the unresolved and perpetual contradiction between both public disavowal and simultaneous maintenance of hierarchy and authority within the movement. This study analyzes how this contradiction is then reproduced in different micro-social interactions, examining the methods by which people negotiate minute details of their daily lives as squatter activists in the face of a funhouse mirror of ideological expectations reflecting values from within the squatter community, that, in turn, often refract mainstream, middle class norms.

Open Access (free)
The autonomous life?
Nazima Kadir

details of their daily lives as squatter activists in the face of a funhouse mirror of ideological expectations reflecting values from within the squatter community, that, in turn, often refract mainstream, middle-class norms. In the examination of this question, I repeatedly revisit questions of performance and habitus. I use the term performance for self-conscious behavior exhibited by activists with a range of audiences in mind, which include a number of characteristics. First, I argue, they should display a

in The autonomous life?
Mark Tomlinson and Andrew McMeekin

burgeoning literature on different lifestyles, Green movements, ‘queer’ studies, etc. On the other hand, and defending a more ‘structuralist’ position, there is a continuing body of work that takes a more traditional collectivist stance as a starting point, many of them drawing on the work of Bourdieu. Bourdieu often uses the concept of ‘habitus’ to help to explain the behaviour of different social groups, particularly their consumption patterns. In his classic 78 Innovation by demand work Distinction (1984) he takes this concept and builds a framework within sociology

in Innovation by demand
Open Access (free)
The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author: Neil Macmaster

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

Open Access (free)
Bridget Byrne and Carla De Tona

schooling also provide cultural capital, being one site where children develop tastes and dispositions and where they learn how to act and be comfortable in particular social settings. Cultural and social capital ensure that individuals can feel at ease within a habitus (or in fact several potentially overlapping habitus). For Bourdieu, habitus is a system of embodied dispositions which are produced relationally and which structure the social world – ranging from ‘hexis’ (ways of using one’s body, speaking etc.) to schemes of perception and classification which shape how

in All in the mix
Open Access (free)
Nazima Kadir

inhabiting a location, whether that is a claimed and performed identity or a seemingly natural “habitus,” while simultaneously being recognized by others as authentic. Thus, the process of being named as authentic is constantly in flux because it depends on the actors involved: those who are or consider themselves authentic and those who then recognize (or do not) that authenticity. I argue that the act of living in a squat is not enough to be recognized as an authentic squatter. Authenticity is, rather, a status that one

in The autonomous life?
Open Access (free)
The economy of unromantic solidarity
Nazima Kadir

subculture. In Chapter 1 , I argued that through examining squatter skills and negative classifications, one can see how unspoken status hierarchies function in this community. In Chapter 2 , I contended that authority figures should display a certain performance of “autonomous” squatter selfhood, comprising assertiveness, the capacity for highly prestigious squatter skills, such as public speaking, campaigning, and presswork, and a habitus of emotional sovereignty. Moreover, I demonstrated how their authority is

in The autonomous life?
Open Access (free)
Negotiating with multiculture
Bridget Byrne and Carla De Tona

distance. At least part of this difference in responses comes from a different class habitus. Thus for the more professional middle classes in Chorlton, many of them working in the public sector, a ‘liberal’ and convivial attitude is part of their class habitus (Bourdieu 1991). What is interesting is how this language is also shared by some ethnic minorities and migrants from a variety of class positions. For the white working-class and middle-class parents living in Cheadle Hulme, there is more hesitation in both talking about and perhaps living with difference. These

in All in the mix
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

, nuclear family and education. Within the latter, school cricket also played no small role in teaching young black boys how to be “civilised,” in education institutions across the Caribbean (Sandiford, 1998 ). It was not only the sport itself, but the style of play that conferred a respectable habitus. However, as is the wont of (post)colonial subjects, a simultaneous

in Sport in the Black Atlantic