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Open Access (free)
World Heritage and modernity
Author: Jes Wienberg

Heritopia explores the multiple meanings of the past in the present, using the famous temples of Abu Simbel and other World Heritage sites as points of departure. It employs three perspectives in its attempt to understand and explain both past and present the truth of knowledge, the beauties of narrative, and ethical demands. Crisis theories are rejected as nostalgic expressions of contemporary social criticism. Modernity is viewed as a collection of contradictory narratives and reinterpreted as a combination of technological progress and recently evolved ideas. The book argues that while heritage is expanding, it is not to be found everywhere, and its expansion does not constitute a problem. It investigates the World Heritage Convention as an innovation, demonstrating that the definition of a World Heritage site succeeds in creating a tenable category of outstanding and exclusive heritage. The book introduces the term “Heritopia” in order to conceptualise the utopian expectations associated with World Heritage. Finally, it points to the possibilities of using the past creatively when meeting present-day and future challenges.

Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

kritikos , meaning capable of judging, and krisis , meaning a decision or judgement. So is it the case, as many have claimed, that the use of the past increases in periods of crisis? Crisis and the heritage industry I believe that a civilisation which tends towards conservatism is a declining civilisation because it is afraid to go forward and ascribes more importance to its memories than to its future. Strong, expanding civilisations have no memory: they reject, they forget the past. They feel strong enough to be destructive because they know they can replace

in Heritopia
Open Access (free)
Anthropology and rural West Europe today
Jeremy MacClancy

To set the scene for the rest of the book, this chapter discusses the evolving discourses of the rural and the urban, the exploitation of this discourse by some political parties, and the rise of the heritage industry. It then proceeds to survey the literature, in both anthropology and geography, on north European immigration into rural Western Europe: who these people are, when they arrived, what effects have they had on the social, economic, and political life of the places they chose to settle in. Since this material is relatively scanty, I have also relied on material within popular travelogues. I then discuss, in a similar manner, the nature and consequence of labour migration from North Africa and Eastern Europe to these areas. I conclude by considering the roles anthropologists can play today in today’s countrysides, in the development of rural life and the formulation of rural policy.

in Alternative countrysides
Open Access (free)
Memories of cinema-going in the ‘Golden Age’ of Hollywood
Sarah Stubbings

). 4 See Raphael Samuel, Theatres of Memory (London: Verso, 1994) and Robert Hewison, The Heritage Industry (London: Methuen, 1987). Samuel offers a detailed and wide-ranging study of some of the ways in which memory is preserved in British society, arguing that ‘the last thirty years have witnessed an extraordinary and, it seems, ever growing enthusiasm

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

increase in musealisation in Switzerland and Germany over the twentieth century (Lübbe 1982 ); Robert Hewison observed an increase in the number of museums, theme parks, and visitor centres in England since the 1960s and launched the concept “Heritage Industry” (Hewison 1987 : 83ff); Françoise Choay perceived an inflation in heritage since the 1960s, reacting particularly strongly against the establishment of industrial monuments and increased heritage tourism (Choay 1992 (French): 158ff; 2001 (English): 138ff); and Andreas Huyssen observed a “relentless museummania

in Heritopia
Open Access (free)
Memory and popular film
Paul Grainge

, and conspicuous fostering of, cultural remembering. Indeed, the development of memory since the 1970s has been linked to various aspects that are not strictly ideological or textual in nature. These include diversifying markets for memory, the growth of the heritage industry, and the proliferation of technologies of time-shifting like VCR and DVD. In various ways, these have shaped a burgeoning market for cinematic remembrance, and

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
The ‘outside’ in poetry in the 1980s and 1990s
Linden Peach

between, for example, the image-saturated, multi-media packages based on what were once real working mines by the Welsh heritage industry in Mike Jenkins’s poem, ‘Industrial Museum’ and the simulacra that develop around Einstein in Robert Crawford’s ‘Alba Einstein’ to which I referred on p. 106. But while there are similarities in the post-industrial world emerging in Minhinnick’s Wales or Crawford’s Scotland, it is experienced differently in different regions. Jenkins’ and Minhinnick’s critique of ‘postmodernity’, and their means of arguing for resistance, is based on

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
The art of performance and her work in film
Katharine Cockin

the heritage industry later in the century.29 Bamford quotes Hepworth’s strategic approach: ‘It was always in the back of my mind from the very beginning that I was to make English pictures, with all the English countryside for background and with English atmosphere and English idiom throughout.’ If the cinema was sometimes known as the theatre of dreams, then Hepworth must be seen as one of the principal purveyors of a dream of English which was ‘essentially rural and essentially unchanging’. (Bamford, 1999: 11) Simon Rowson, the owner of the company that produced

in Stage women, 1900–50
Open Access (free)
A war of extermination, grave looting, and culture wars in the American West
Tony Platt

world, from Moscow to San Francisco, as museums competed to accumulate ‘a kind of Noah’s ark collection, two from each area, two of each type’.32 Researchers and scientists were unable to keep up with the avalanche of materials that filled up the basements and display cases of museums.33 By the mid-nineteenth century, there was also a brisk trade in Native body parts, propelled by the popularity of commercial and recreational collecting, scientific curiosity, and the heritage industry.34 Scientists in universities and museums joined the hunt in the hope that Native

in Human remains and identification
Journeys through postmodern Dublin
David Slattery

relevant in the thriving business of the Porter House. Bourdieu rightly highlighted the relational dynamic that operates between these two structuring principles. The heritage industry appears to mark a shift in the sociology of knowledge from the relatively autonomous museum to the economic capital of entertainment. In the Porter House, living museum of beer production, site of cultural production and habituated display of bodies at ease with postmodernity, a living lesson in how to have the craic, these principles come together. This is the Irish habitus. Its grammar

in The end of Irish history?