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An Interview with Rainer Schlösser, Spokesperson of the Association of the Red Cross Museums in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der deutschen Rotkreuz-Museen)
Sönke Kunkel

, museums certainly only had a kind of a marginal say within the Red Cross movement, where people were like, ‘ah yeah, those few museum directors in their niche, just let them do their thing.’ Today, museums are actively involved and asked for in shaping the movement’s historical communication. For example, on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of the German Red Cross, German Red Cross organizations drew widely on the historical expertise of Red Cross museums. The same is happening now in light of the centenary of the German Red Cross’s reorganization, to be celebrated

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Valérie Gorin and Sönke Kunkel

heritage’ of their work ‘in their communication activities’ ( Red Cross Council of Delegates, 2015 ), allow access to their audiovisual archives, or have established units for ‘historical communication’ within their headquarters. 1 Here as well, however, exchange and cooperation between professional historians and communication practitioners seems marginal at best and has only recently started to evolve. 2 New collaborative approaches between academics and practitioners, such as the initiative

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Visual Politics and Narratives of Red Cross Museums in Europe and the United States, 1920s to 2010s
Sönke Kunkel

got none of that’ ( MikeandHannah, 2017 ). The Volunteer’s Narrative: The 1980s ‘Museum Boom’ within the German Red Cross Movement and Its Aftermath Given the scale of investments it has attracted, its ambition for international leadership, its popularity, and the professional state-of-the-art museology behind it, the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum in Geneva stands out today as the principal center of historical communication and learning

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs