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David Larsson Heidenblad

. What I particularly want to consider here is the history-of-knowledge approach. How does my study contribute to defining and developing the history of knowledge as a research field? What more general insights and perspectives can historians of knowledge draw from it? Finally, I would also like to take this opportunity to look beyond the present study. Does the historical narrative I have written have any significance for us today? Does the breakthrough of environmental issues in the years around 1970 make any

in The environmental turn in postwar Sweden
A new history of knowledge

This book tells the story of how modern environmentalism emerged in postwar Sweden. It shows that the ‘environmental turn’ in Sweden occurred as early as the autumn of 1967 and that natural scientists led the way. The most influential was the chemist Hans Palmstierna, who was both an active Social Democrat and a regular contributor to the nation’s leading morning paper. Thus, he had a unique platform from which to exert influence. Drawing on his rich and previously untapped personal archive, the book explores how popular environmental engagement developed in Sweden. The book also highlights the journalist Barbro Soller, who in the mid-1960s became Sweden’s – and indeed one of the world’s – first environmental journalists. Moreover, it demonstrates how the pioneering historian Birgitta Odén, in collaboration with the Swedish National Defence Research Institute, sought to launch an interdisciplinary research programme based in the humanities and the social sciences as early as 1967–1968. An important conclusion of the book is that environmentalism emerged in Swedish society before there was an actual environmental movement. However, from 1969 onwards new social movements began to alter the dynamics. Hence, by the time the United Nations arranged the Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment in June 1972, environmental knowledge had become a source of conflict between rival interests. The environmental turn in postwar Sweden is the first full-length study to emerge from the Lund Centre for the History of Knowledge (LUCK), and demonstrates how its specific take on the history of knowledge enhances historical scholarship.

Open Access (free)
David Larsson Heidenblad

issues seizes on and seeks to develop the new research field concerned with the history of knowledge. This field has emerged during the 2000s and brings together researchers from various historical specialities. In the early 2000s, the discussions were mainly conducted in German-speaking Europe around the concept of Wissensgeschichte . 7 Around 2015, however, international interest began to grow, not least in the Nordic countries. At that time Johan Östling launched the equivalent Swedish term, ‘kunskapshistoria’, and the

in The environmental turn in postwar Sweden
Johan Östling

Universitätsgeschichte’; Paletschek, ‘Stand und Perspektiven’; Paletschek, ‘The Writing of University History’; Rohstock, ‘The History of Higher Education’; Johan Östling, ‘Universitetshistoria: Friska vindar över gammalt fält’, Respons, 2015:2. The history of the university 5 too many potential insights to be left to collectors of anecdotes and writers of chronicles. For this reason, I will present a framework drawn from intellectual history and the history of knowledge which may provide university history with relevant themes and methods. University history as intellectual

in Humboldt and the modern German university
Open Access (free)
Johan Östling

relate the transformation of contemporary academic culture to greater dislocations? And how are we to understand the place of the Humboldtian tradition in modern German history as a whole? It is time to return to the basic issues, assemble the insights of the investigation, and expand the field of vision. The Humboldtian tradition’s intellectual history and history of knowledge Throughout the entire modern era, the battles over the university formed part of larger cultural and social issues. Sometimes the conflicts were an aspect of something broader; at other times

in Humboldt and the modern German university
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author: Joe Turner

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

Open Access (free)
Post-concepts in historical perspective
Herman Paul

with unexpected connections, transfers and parallels between fields that are too often studied in isolation from one other. In doing so, the volume encourages historians of sociology, historians of theology and historians of political thought to transcend their disciplinary boundaries and work together towards a rapprochement between the social sciences and the humanities (including philosophy and theology). 49 Some chapters even show affinity with history of knowledge approaches as advocated by Lorraine Daston and others

in Post-everything
Open Access (free)
Bordering intimacy
Joe Turner

: 120; on colonial archives see Arondekar 2005). One way of exploring such a history is through law, and the way the law builds 20 Bordering intimacy and collapses subjectivities, relations and bodies across time and space (Dayan 2011). An example of this is examining how colonial ordinances and acts of parliaments circulate across imperial space and how the law today builds and resurrects this architecture. Such an approach underpins much of the archival work in this book. This is not solely a history of knowledge but also of practice. I trace where practices

in Bordering intimacy
Christine E. Hallett

(New  York:  Penguin, 2011); Harriet Eaton, This Birth Place of Souls:  The Civil War Nursing Diary of Harriet Eaton, ed. Jane E. Schultz (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010); Jane E. Schultz, Women at the Front:  Hospital Workers in Civil War America (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004).  3 Patricia D’Antonio, American Nursing: A History of Knowledge, Authority, and the Meaning of Work (Baltimore: John’s Hopkins University Press, 2010).  4 Midori Yamaguchi states that Luard’s given names were Katherine Evelyn, in that order. Her pen-name, for

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Sweden and the lesser powers in the long eighteenth century
Erik Bodensten

’histoire Nordique – Nordic Historical Review 14.1 (2012), 39–62; Patrik Winton, ‘Sweden and the Seven Years War, 1757–1762: War, Debt and Politics’, War in History 19.1 (2012), 5–31; Peter Lindström and Svante Norrhem, Flattering Alliances: Scandinavia, Diplomacy, and the Austrian–French Balance of Power, 1646–1740 (Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2013); Erik Bodensten, ‘Political Knowledge in Public Circulation: The Case of Subsidies in Eighteenth-century Sweden’, in Circulation of Knowledge: Explorations into the History of Knowledge, ed. by Johan Östling, Erling Sandmo, David

in Subsidies, diplomacy, and state formation in Europe, 1494–1789