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Mel Bunce

) . Scarry , E. ( 1987 ), The Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the World ( Oxford : Oxford University Press ). Scott , M. , Bunce , M. and Wright , K. ( forthcoming ), ‘ The Politics of Humanitarian Journalism ’, in Chouliaraki , L. and Vestergaard , A. (eds), Handbook of Humanitarian Communication ( London : Routledge ). Scott , M. , Wright , K. and Bunce , M. ( 2018 ), The State of Humanitarian Journalism ( Norwich

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Visual Politics and Narratives of Red Cross Museums in Europe and the United States, 1920s to 2010s
Sönke Kunkel

Introduction This essay discusses Red Cross museums as a medium of humanitarian communication. A long-neglected theme in public history and the historiography of humanitarianism, Red Cross museums today are vital agents in the movement’s work to communicate the values, missions, and historical achievements of Red Cross societies around the world. Local publics find those museums in the United States, the UK, or Germany – which has more than a

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Valérie Gorin and Sönke Kunkel

humanitarian communication, and you get a different picture: here, history is everywhere. No website of any major humanitarian organization comes along without its own history section. On YouTube, humanitarian players provide an ever growing number of documentaries about their past and origins. Fundraising campaigns, mass mailings, and social media posts all point frequently to historical achievements. Major aid organizations now also call on their branches to ‘enhance the historical and cultural

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Visual Advocacy in the Early Decades of Humanitarian Cinema
Valérie Gorin

’, ‘disaster’, ‘tragedy’, ‘agony’, ‘dreadful’, and ‘wild terror’). The discourse stressed the unequal (moral) relation between the miserable beneficiary and the potent benefactor through personification (‘you’). This follows the Victorian melodrama style familiar to human rights activists ( Newey, 2000 ) that is still present in today’s humanitarian communication ( Wells, 2013 ). The feelings induced were instrumental in turning distant suffering into a morally worthy issue. This way, the ‘truth status of images always depends on critical contextualization’ ( McLagan, 2006

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Valérie Gorin

Introduction Humanitarian films in the 1920s served to blame or impel audiences, without naming or shaming perpetrators most of the time. Instead of being proper political advocacy, early humanitarian cinema displayed more educational advocacy, which aims to impose a transformative agenda based on solidarity. Advocacy developed more systematically as a form of humanitarian communication in the 1970s and 1980s. It was influenced by the French and British schools of humanitarianism ( Dolan, 1992 ; Edwards, 1993 ; Gorin, 2018 ). While British NGOs such as

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Arjun Claire

), ‘ Between Aid and Politics: Diagnosing the Challenge of Humanitarian Advocacy in Politically Complex Environments – the Case of Darfur, Sudan ’, Third World Quarterly , 31 : 8 , 1251 – 69 , doi: 10.1080/01436597.2010.541084 . Chouliaraki , L. ( 2010 ), ‘ Post-Humanitarianism: Humanitarian Communication beyond a Politics of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From starving children to satirical saviours
Rachel Tavernor

children, surrounded by flies. 3 However, on Facebook, dominant images of starving children are now filtered by a structure that privileges content that users can ‘like,’ ‘comment’ or ‘share’. Facebook algorithms, along with the architects of Facebook, have now become the new ‘gatekeepers’ of humanitarian communication and NGOs have started to adapt their representations of humanitarianism. In particular

in Global humanitarianism and media culture

This collection interrogates the representation of humanitarian crisis and catastrophe, and the refraction of humanitarian intervention and action, from the mid-twentieth century to the present, across a diverse range of media forms: traditional and contemporary screen media (film, television and online video) as well as newspapers, memoirs, music festivals and social media platforms (such as Facebook, YouTube and Flickr). The book thus explores the historical, cultural and political contexts that have shaped the mediation of humanitarian relationships since the middle of the twentieth century. Together, the chapters illustrate the continuities and connections, as well as the differences, which have characterised the mediatisation of both states of emergency and acts of amelioration. The authors reveal and explore the significant synergies between the humanitarian enterprise, the endeavour to alleviate the suffering of particular groups, and media representations, and their modes of addressing and appealing to specific publics. The chapters consider the ways in which media texts, technologies and practices reflect and shape the shifting moral, political, ethical, rhetorical, ideological and material dimensions of international humanitarian emergency and intervention, and have become integral to the changing relationships between organisations, institutions, governments, individual actors and entire sectors.

Journalism practice, risk and humanitarian communication
Jairo Lugo-Ocando and Gabriel Andrade

Regarding the need of an effective humanitarian communication that can politically assist mobilisation and public engagement, many scholarly works have focused upon the ability of the news media to create regimes of pity in order to mobilise the public towards humanitarian causes. 1 Some authors have gone further to say that if audiences are passive and uninterested, sometimes the media have to

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Open Access (free)
Michael Lawrence and Rachel Tavernor

, representations of humanitarianism are created in increasingly contested environments, with financial, political and cultural pressures shaping their production. Structure of book In Part I , ‘Histories of Humanity’, we begin by mapping the historical contexts of popular humanitarian communication. The authors consider how moving image and print media were deployed to promote awareness and

in Global humanitarianism and media culture