Andrew Bowie

2 German Idealism and early German Romanticism Thinking the infinite The immediate consequences from the 1790s onwards of the perceived failure of Kant’s attempt to ground philosophy in the principle of subjectivity are apparent in two areas of philosophy which carry the broad names ‘German Idealism’, which is mainly associated with Fichte, Schelling and Hegel; and ‘early Romanticism’, which is mainly associated with Novalis, Friedrich Schlegel and (in some respects) Friedrich Schleiermacher.1 There are, as we shall see, crucial respects in which these two

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Editor’s Introduction
Juliano Fiori

at least irrelevant, if not a hindrance, to the US. Trump’s consistent disregard for multilateralism and his authoritarian posturing towards allies and enemies alike now confirm the trend away from liberal internationalism that, despite cosmopolitan rhetoric, was already evident under the presidency of Barack Obama. This trend is not simply part of the secular fluctuation in American foreign policy between idealism and realism: its end is a rupture with the American exceptionalism essential to both traditions. The National Security

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Jeffrey Flynn

). Chouliaraki , L. ( 2013 ), The Ironic Spectator: Solidarity in the Age of Post-Humanitarianism ( Cambridge : Polity Press ). Davey , E. ( 2015 ), Idealism beyond Borders: The French Revolutionary Left and the Rise of Humanitarianism, 1954–1988 ( Cambridge

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Visual Politics and Narratives of Red Cross Museums in Europe and the United States, 1920s to 2010s
Sönke Kunkel

this country and in Europe and in Siberia, and to give the public an opportunity of learning the ideals of service of the Red Cross through visualization’ ( Brigham, 1922 ). The museum, in other words, was there to showcase stories and examples of Red Cross idealism and heroism; it was not there to provide a critical rethinking of Red Cross work. The museum’s centerpiece were miniature group models that provided idealized allegories of Red Cross work and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Valérie Gorin

). 16 See the CHA’s webinars: www.chaberlin.org/en/event/the-triple-nexus-threat-or-opportunity-for-humanitarian-principles/ (accessed 26 December 2020). Works Cited Davey , E. ( 2015 ), Idealism beyond Borders: The French Revolutionary Left and the Rise of Humanitarianism, 1954–1988 ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press ). Desgrandchamps , M.-L. , Heerten , L. , Oko Omaka , A. , O’Sullivan , K. , and Taithe , B. ( 2020 ), ‘ Biafra, Humanitarian Intervention and History ’, Journal of Humanitarian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Lewis Hine’s Photographs of Refugees for the American Red Cross, 1918–20
Sonya de Laat

ARC also faced debate within its own organization as to its proper peacetime role. Patriotic duty, the sense that carried the ARC’s relief activities throughout the war, was being replaced as the year went on by nationalistic fervor and a call to refocus benevolent activities on more local needs. The ARC found itself struggling against competing interests throughout 1919 and 1920, with refugees eventually being outmaneuvered by a narrowing of humanitarian idealism. During the war, The Red Cross Magazine had been a beacon of the ARC’s expanding abilities. By the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Marie-Luce Desgrandchamps, Lasse Heerten, Arua Oko Omaka, Kevin O'Sullivan, and Bertrand Taithe

: Cambridge University Press ). Davey , E. ( 2015 ), Idealism beyond Borders: The French Revolutionary Left and the Rise of Humanitarianism (1954–1988) ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press ). de St. Jorre , J. ( 1972 ), The Nigerian Civil War

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editors: Stan Metcalfe and Alan Warde

There has been increasing interest and debate in recent years on the instituted nature of economic processes in general and the related ideas of the market and the competitive process in particular. This debate lies at the interface between two largely independent disciplines, economics and sociology, and reflects an attempt to bring the two fields of discourse more closely together. This book explores this interface in a number of ways, looking at the competitive process and market relations from a number of different perspectives. It considers the social role of economic institutions in society and examines the various meanings embedded in the word 'markets', as well as developing arguments on the nature of competition as an instituted economic process. The close of the twentieth century saw a virtual canonisation of markets as the best, indeed the only really effective, way to govern an economic system. The market organisation being canonised was simple and pure, along the lines of the standard textbook model in economics. The book discusses the concepts of polysemy , idealism, cognition, materiality and cultural economy. Michael Best provides an account of regional economic adaptation to changed market circumstances. This is the story of the dynamics of capitalism focused on the resurgence of the Route 128 region around Boston following its decline in the mid-1980s in the face of competition from Silicon Valley. The book also addresses the question of how this resurgence was achieved.

Open Access (free)
Art as the ‘organ of philosophy’
Andrew Bowie

between ‘Criticism’ and ‘Dogmatism’, a project he characterises in terms of a reconciliation of Idealism and Realism, or of transcendental philosophy and Naturphilosophie. The main problem this involves is the primacy of the two approaches in relation to each other. Prioritising transcendental philosophy avoids dogmatism, but at the expense of rendering nature secondary to the I, and thus giving rise to Fichte’s problems. Naturphilosophie gives an account of the I’s ground in material nature, but seems to have to rely on dogmatic premises to do so – if nature can only

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Andrew Bowie

ideas of reason and nature. In order to see why, we need to consider certain aspects of the anti-Idealism of Schopenhauer and Marx, before turning in more detail to Nietzsche’s own texts. Schopenhauer: music as metaphysics The importance of Arthur Schopenhauer (1788–1860) for the work of the early Nietzsche is well established. However, it is not clear that Nietzsche’s rejection of Schopenhauer in his later work means that he in fact rejected all of the elements of Schopenhauer’s thought which had been central to his early texts. Schopenhauer is an interestingly

in Aesthetics and subjectivity