Search results

M. Anne Brown

poverty, poor environmental health and mental distress, a high death rate for infants and small children, and appallingly high rates of suicide, violence and substance abuse. As will become clear, patterns of ill-health lock into the struggles around land rights. At a concrete level, however, almost all Indigenous Australians, including those who live beyond the immediate scope of land rights, are affected by high levels of disease. Questions of Aboriginal health often have a curious status. The linkage between Aboriginal ill-health and what could

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
The promotion of human rights in international politics
Author: M. Anne Brown

This book argues for greater openness in the ways we approach human rights and international rights promotion, and in so doing brings some new understanding to old debates. Starting with the realities of abuse rather than the liberal architecture of rights, it casts human rights as a language for probing the political dimensions of suffering. Seen in this context, the predominant Western models of right generate a substantial but also problematic and not always emancipatory array of practices. These models are far from answering the questions about the nature of political community that are raised by the systemic infliction of suffering. Rather than a simple message from ‘us’ to ‘them’, then, rights promotion is a long and difficult conversation about the relationship between political organisations and suffering. Three case studies are explored: the Tiananmen Square massacre, East Timor's violent modern history and the circumstances of indigenous Australians. The purpose of these discussions is not to elaborate on a new theory of rights, but to work towards rights practices that are more responsive to the spectrum of injury that we inflict and endure.

So what went wrong?
Odette Best

received training to be ‘native nurses’ who worked in hospitals on settlements In this chapter, an indigenous historical lens is applied to the status of Indigenous nurses and midwives in Australia. I explore the establishment of Australia’s nursing profession, and compare training of white nurses with training received by ‘native nurses’. I suggest that Australia failed to respond to the British Colonial Nursing Service’s agenda and argue that this failure, in part, contributed to the poor health status experienced by Indigenous Australians. I propose that four issues

in Colonial caring
M. Anne Brown

East Timor in the creation and perpetuation of a pattern of severe and embedded abuse. That failure to pay attention to concrete circumstances marked the ‘realism’ of the prevailing international attitudes on East Timor; to what extent might it also characterise the current liberal approaches? The third case study, which looks at the ‘place’ of Indigenous Australians within Australian political life, returns to a liberal rights focus – in this case not involving the language of international rights talk but rather concerning the ideals

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
M. Anne Brown

taken as already settled, and sometimes quite reasonably so. Frequently, however, as the later discussion of the health of Indigenous Australians indicates, such analyses assume or demand a crucial zone of uniformity, whether within the state or more broadly – a realm of public discourse that is declared to be neutral and open to all citizens and others, but one that is repeatedly exclusionary. Moreover, it is easy to overlook or forget these practices of exclusion, simply because within states they have proved relatively effective, so that, for example

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
Open Access (free)
The Queen in Australia
Jane Landman

performance of Corroboree , composed by John Anthill, whose works also feature in the film, and performed in blackface. Those few Indigenous Australians who are featured are always performing their difference – by throwing boomerangs or dancing. A popular shot in royal reportage generally is that of crowds improvising viewing positions – climbing trees, flagpoles or onto roofs to catch a royal glimpse. Such

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
An allegory of imperial rapport
Deirdre Gilfedder

Britain. 27 Yet they also signal its declining relevance in an increasingly multicultural society with the narrow focus on the ‘Anglo’ white male dissipating in the films of the 1990s and beyond. Felicity Collins and Therese Davis demonstrate the rupture that the Mabo decision of 1992 (a High Court decision that allowed Indigenous Australians to claim their land rights) brought to Australian cinema, 28 introducing a

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
M. Anne Brown

administrative traditions can be relevant here. Nevertheless legal (and policing) solutions can prove disastrously insufficient. It seems hardly surprising, for example, that female infanticide in western China is hardly touched by legal prohibition. Nor has formal citizenship, bolstered by anti-discrimination legislation, proved a sufficient response to the marginalisation and ‘outcasting’ of Indigenous Australians. Moreover, as the discussion of Aboriginal health underlines, nor do welfare remedies necessarily make up what is lacking from formal, politico-legal solutions

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
Open Access (free)
Ecopoetics, enjoyment and ecstatic hospitality
Kate Rigby

creatures, human and otherkind’ (1996: 9). More recently, Anne Elvey has defined this term more inclusively to include ‘both those we understand as living (e.g., fleas, whales, and eucalypts) and those we understand otherwise (e.g., glaciers, sand, and air)’ (2014: 36). 4 ‘Caring for country’ should not be confused with Western ecofeminist ‘ethics of care’. It has a foundation in traditional ecological knowledge (‘Law’), rather Deep sustainability 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 71 than sentiment (although Indigenous Australians do evince a high degree of affective

in Literature and sustainability
Open Access (free)
‘Australia for the White Man’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips and Shurlee Swain

Paisley, Loving Protection? Australian Feminism and Aboriginal Women’s Rights, 1919–39 (Melbourne: Melbourne University Press, 2001). 81 Maori Record , 1 November 1906, pp. 44–5; see also Nicolas Peterson and Will Sanders, Citizenship and Indigenous Australians: Changing Conceptions and Possibilities

in Equal subjects, unequal rights