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Power in cross-border Cooperation

The volume explores a question that sheds light on the contested, but largely cooperative, nature of Arctic governance in the post-Cold War period: How do power relations matter – and how have they mattered – in shaping cross-border cooperation and diplomacy in the Arctic? Through carefully selected case studies – from Russia’s role in the Arctic Council to the diplomacy of indigenous peoples’ organisations – this book seeks to shed light on how power performances are enacted constantly to shore up Arctic cooperation in key ways. The conceptually driven nature of the enquiry makes the book appropriate reading for courses in international relations and political geography, while the carefully selected case studies lend themselves to courses on Arctic politics.

Open Access (free)

manifested amongst the indigenous polities of the Arctic would be an important contribution both to Arctic understanding and to the emerging literature on the ‘third space’ of indigenous diplomacy. Likewise, the study of diplomatic norms focused on the interventions of Russia to tell us more about the broader normative landscape of Arctic policy fields. I would anticipate that a similar study of, for example, US interventions may reveal similar, if not identical, findings about these broader inter-​subjective norms in Arctic cross-​border governance, but the work of

in Arctic governance
Open Access (free)
A power perspective on Arctic governance

the various kinds of roles available to those active in Arctic governance. Chapter 4 examines how Arctic governance has become a global social site in its own right, replete with disciplining norms for steering diplomatic behaviour. The chapter draws upon Russia’s role in the Arctic Council as an extended case study. Chapter 5 looks at how Arctic cross-​ border governance can be understood as a site of competition over the exercise of authority, and uses the examples of science-​political and indigenous diplomacy-​state diplomacy interfaces at high-​level Arctic

in Arctic governance

Council. We first look at how debates around the ‘science–​policy interface’ manifest themselves more generally. When is discussion of scientific knowledge (or the presence/​autonomy of scientists) given weight at the high-​political level? Turning to indigenous diplomacy, we analyse and categorise Permanent Participants’ diplomatic interventions in the Arctic Council (which is, of course, just one stage upon which the multifaceted politics of indigenous sovereignty is enacted). In the concluding section, I discuss a concept borrowed from science and technology studies

in Arctic governance