Open Access (free)
An interdisciplinary approach to the study of demand and its role in innovation

This book brings together a range of sociologists and economists to study the role of demand and consumption in the innovative process. Starting with a broad conceptual overview of ways that the sociological and economics literatures address issues of innovation, demand and consumption, it goes on to offer different approaches to the economics of demand and innovation through an evolutionary framework, before reviewing how consumption fits into evolutionary models of economic development. The book then looks at food consumption as an example of innovation by demand, including an examination of the dynamic nature of socially constituted consumption routines. It includes an analysis of how African Americans use consumption to express collective identity and discusses the involvement of consumers in innovation, focusing on how consumer needs may be incorporated in the design of high-tech products. It also argues for the need to build an economic sociology of demand that goes from micro-individual through to macro-structural features.

1 Innovation by demand? An introduction Andrew McMeekin, Ken Green, Mark Tomlinson and Vivien Walsh Sociologists and economists on consumption and demand The structure and regulation of consumption and demand have recently become of great interest to sociologists and economists alike, ‘consumption’ being the focus of sociological accounts, whilst ‘demand’ has been the preserve of economists’ analyses. At the same time, there is growing interest, especially among economists, in trying to understand the patterns and drivers of technological innovation. The

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Female labour in a male-dominated service industry

8 Hyperembedded demand and uneven innovation: female labour in a male-dominated service industry Bonnie H. Erickson In service industries, demand for a service is inseparable from demand for the kind of people seen as suitable for providing the service. The fusion of service and service provider implies that using a new kind of person to provide a service is a true innovation, and one that may meet resistance to the extent that it violates entrenched expectations of who providers should be. One important example is women providing services once monopolised by

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10 Information and communication technologies and the role of consumers in innovation Leslie Haddon As a contribution to current discussions of the role of both actual consumers and representations of consumers in the innovation process, this chapter considers two empirical studies of the information and communication technology (ICT) industries. It asks: 1 To what extent, how and when are consumers (i.e. potential end users) considered or involved during the design of new products? 2 When consumers are actually involved in the process of innovation, what is the

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Humanitarian innovation emerged as a recognised field with the launch of a research programme by ALNAP in 2008; it was clear at the time that the sector was ready for the systematic approach to innovation proposed by the final review ( Ramalingam et al. , 2009 ). Ben Ramalingam has said that ‘none of us in the team have ever had a recommendation become such a tangible reality in so short a time’ ( ODI, 2010 ), including, most tangibly, the creation of the Humanitarian Innovation Fund in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

overcoming some language barriers, though others persisted ( Munro, 2013 ). The Haiti earthquake illustrates the multilingual nature of humanitarian crises and the importance of translation, as well as the close connection between language and humanitarian ICT innovations. These features are not unique to the Haiti earthquake, and many crises occur in contexts where linguistic diversity is greater. A recent example of the need for translation and interpreting in humanitarian response is the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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A multidisciplinary perspective

criterion in market economies is a matter of income, which is provided by supply-side processes, we can neglect it here. Taking this catalogue as a classification tool, we discuss two different approaches to modelling the adoption of novelty. 58 Innovation by demand The Lancasterian production analogy Kelvin Lancaster (1966) makes some modifications of preference theory that allow him to apply the standard rational choice framework. Consequently, in accordance with a dogma later formulated by Stigler and Becker (1977), he presumes preferences to be given. Since direct

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Open Access (free)
Purchasing, consumption and innovation

9 Greening organisations: purchasing, consumption and innovation Ken Green, Barbara Morton and Steve New In this chapter we examine some previously ignored connections between processes of organisational purchasing and innovation in the context of the greening of organisations. We build an argument around the idea of consumption and we do so to problematise explicitly the issue of collective agency as it relates to organisations. In developing the argument, we ask: who is the consumer and what do consumers do? Despite the thriving field of research in

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An instituted economic process approach

norms. These foods, therefore, can be seen to represent ‘maximum separation’ between supply and demand. And yet, even with ‘maximum 188 Innovation by demand separation’, we have the quotation with which this chapter opened from Wakefield which tussles in a richly but hopelessly contradictory manner with the question of what is the relationship between supply and demand for new products, and in the creation of new norms of consumption. Let us pause for a moment to explore his contradictory formulations. The brief quotation can be seen to accommodate four

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management of the design process. The organisation sponsoring the research was the Design Council, whose own objective is the promotion of effective design in manufacturing and service industry. The other objective was to contribute to the body of academic work currently being undertaken, in Manchester and elsewhere, which seeks to analyse design and innovation activities within an interdisciplinary framework of the social sciences, exploring the potential for rapprochement among technology management, sociology of innovation, economics of technological change

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