Open Access (free)
James Baldwin, Teju Cole, and Glenn Ligon
Monika Gehlawat

This essay uses Edward Said’s theory of affiliation to consider the relationship between James Baldwin and contemporary artists Teju Cole and Glenn Ligon, both of whom explicitly engage with their predecessor’s writing in their own work. Specifically, Baldwin’s essay “Stranger in the Village” (1953) serves a through-line for this discussion, as it is invoked in Cole’s essay “Black Body” and Ligon’s visual series, also titled Stranger in the Village. In juxtaposing these three artists, I argue that they express the dialectical energy of affiliation by articulating ongoing concerns of race relations in America while distinguishing themselves from Baldwin in terms of periodization, medium-specificity, and their broader relationship to Western art practice. In their adoption of Baldwin, Cole and Ligon also imagine a way beyond his historical anxieties and writing-based practice, even as they continue to reinscribe their own work with his arguments about the African-American experience. This essay is an intermedial study that reads fiction, nonfiction, language-based conceptual art and mixed media, as well as contemporary politics and social media in order consider the nuances of the African-American experience from the postwar period to our contemporary moment. Concerns about visuality/visibility in the public sphere, narrative voice, and self-representation, as well as access to cultural artifacts and aesthetic engagement, all emerge in my discussion of this constellation of artists. As a result, this essay identifies an emblematic, though not exclusive, strand of African-American intellectual thinking that has never before been brought together. It also demonstrates the ongoing relevance of Baldwin’s thinking for the contemporary political scene in this country.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
Sarah Bernhardt, Queen Elizabeth and the development of motion pictures
Victoria Duckett

Sarah Bernhardt's Queen Elizabeth (Henri Desfontaines and Louis Mercanton, 1911) was an international popular success, released in the US as a headline attraction for the Famous Players company founded by Charles Frohman and Adolph Zukor in order to distribute the film. It drew other theatrical stars to the cinema and helped to inaugurate the longer playing narrative film, furthering a new category of spectacle in cinema itself. Yet scholars and historians have long denounced Queen Elizabeth as anachronistic and stagey, material proof of its star's inability to engage with film. Examining specific scenes and shots, this chapter will show that the film's appropriation of a rich history of the stage, painting and literature challenges us to think of early cinema in new and provocative ways. The aim is not to uncover a lost masterpiece, but to demonstrate that only today, at a point at which we can discuss intermediality, transnational art forms and feminism as related undertakings, is it possible to explore Bernhardt's 'moving' Tudor Queen.

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
John Lydgate’s ‘Soteltes for the coronation banquet of Henry VI’
Heather Blatt

that haptic visuality encourages a ‘bodily relation’ that relies on connections between the viewer’s body, the object, and vision. See Touch, sensuous theory and multisensory media (Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 2002), 17. 34 Susanne Akbari, Seeing through the veil: optical theory and medieval allegory (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2004), 24. 35 For further consideration of virtuality, see Órla Murphy, who addresses these blurred boundaries through the lens of intermediality in, ‘Intermediality: experiencing the virtual text’, in Readings on

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Outdoor screens and public congregations
Ruth Adams

Trafalgar Square. 100 As an explanatory framework Barker offers ‘the idea of “intermediality” … a world of increasingly interpenetrative media which constantly cross-refer’. 101 As we have seen, the British monarchy themselves are active participants in this brave new media world. Conscious that their survival depends to a large part on popular support, they have embraced social media and the digital, and

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

irrelevant – to draw sharp dividing lines between different types of talk: that which is contained in rumours and gossip spread in the course of interpersonal meetings in the local community; that which is written in threads on Flashback; that which is written in newspapers; and that which is produced by radio and TV channels. Rather, what is fascinating in this context are the intermedial connections which testify to the intrinsic complexity of the media system, where so-called ordinary people exert a not insignificant influence on the duration and dissemination of a

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
The Australian and New Zealand repertoires and fortunes of North American performers Margaret Anglin, Katherine Grey and Muriel Starr
Veronica Kelly

entertainment. Sometimes, as was the case with Muriel Starr, global technological and financial revolutions, their consequences reaching even to, say, the tiny Victorian Alpine town of Tumut, could remorselessly strike down the career of a genuinely popular stage favourite. In a real sense, a completely non-international twentieth-­century actor is a rare being. Newspaper saturation, accompanied by the ­164 Women and popular performance international penetration of performers via the related intermedial forms of radio and film, ensured that in Tumut, no less than in neon

in Stage women, 1900–50
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

make up intermedial connections: they reflect and affect one another; they shape and develop one another; and they collaborate and interact with one another (Harvard and Lundell 2010:7–25). The analysis above is a case in point. On a concrete plane, it showed how talk, rumours, and gossip, both in actual corridors and in social, digital media – and including actors from outside the media business – can be colonised in the written journalistic text, and how this in turn can give rise to further oral conversations. At a first glance, these intersecting routes do not

in Exposed