Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author: Joe Turner

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

Open Access (free)
Bordering intimacy
Joe Turner

Introduction: bordering intimacy This book began on an EasyJet flight. Or to be more specific, it began when my partner and I were stopped from getting on an EasyJet flight. In the early hours of the morning we had arrived at the airport to board a flight to Sicily for fieldwork and to attend a conference. As we queued to board the plane with our young son, the airline staff made a further inspection of my partner’s visa documents and her recently acquired family migration visa and marriage certificate. Unsure of the rules that applied to non-EU citizens

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

’. Immigration, the story goes, does not simply threaten British society but it does so by undermining the normative institutions of marriage and family. So, what is so dangerous about sham marriage? And in turn, what is a ‘sham’? Who is a ‘sham’? And what do ‘shams’ do? In this chapter I trace the way that fears about shams have driven a style of government in contemporary Britain built on demarcations of ‘genuine’ and ‘sham’ Shams 101 intimacies. Starting with immigration rules around family migration, I reveal how this has connected up with broader practices of

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Pasts and presents
Joe Turner

regimes and visual registers of normality, emerged as experiments of colonial management. Central to the continuity of colonial borders has been the way that ‘family’ works as a transit point for colonial taxonomies of perversion and the human – that is, in categorising who should be subject to borders, who can move, who can settle, who is dangerous. From sham marriages, to monstrous intimacies, to the ‘good’, domesticated migrant, I have shown the work that the normative power of family does in making certain people appear normal, domesticated, familial – and

in Bordering intimacy
Joe Turner

encounter in the racialised Making love, making empire 65 and sexualised logics of colonialism. It stands, I argue, as an example of the way that mobility, intimacy and claims to family played a central role in both energising and organising colonial rule. After the opening of the exhibit, newspaper stories circulated regarding the effect of the presence of the ‘savages’ in London. Exoticised and eroticised accounts of ‘savage’ behaviour spread as far as the Los Angelesbased Pall Mall paper. White women, it was said, were seen disappearing into the tribal tents which

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Beowulf translations by Seamus Heaney and Thomas Meyer
David Hadbawnik

A reader sits down with a book. The book contains a translation of an old poem, a poem written – or composed, passed down orally, pieced together over time, eventually copied into a manuscript, edited and printed – in a dead language, Old English. The act of reading this poem in translation is a kind of intimacy. But what kind? The reader wishes to come close to, forge a connection with, the original poem in some way. Perhaps they want to hear echoes of the sound of the dead language, its rhythms and patterns; perhaps they want to get a sense

in Dating Beowulf
Antonia Lucia Dawes

of the women in my street market sites – black women, white Neapolitan women, those working in the market or those passing through – revealed key insights about interconnected patterns of sexual conventions and racialised domination in Napoli. These conventions uncovered a melancholic recollection of colonialism and US military occupation – that continued to demarcate the city in subtle ways – and laid the groundwork for negotiating and managing contemporary fears around racial intimacy. Paranoias about the threat to local ‘sexual preserves’ were articulated

in Race talk
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

Bordering intimacy 5  ‘These water melons’, c.1860. The second time I encountered the image was in the Bristol Museum gallery in a display on Empire through the Lens, a display of twenty-seven images describing the impact of the British Empire. This time, the image was accompanied by a reading by Anderson and Mortimer Evelyn (2019). They highlight the racist composition of the image but also argue that in these labourers ‘look’ is a recognition that they are being caricatured. Within this look, they argue, ‘resides a testament to endurance’. The children’s stare, which

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

) The above event, and the narrative of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre more broadly, provides a compelling theorisation of familial domesticity and the regulation of mobility under the British Empire. Bertha Mason, the subject of the above passage, is presented as the first ‘creole’ wife of Mr Rochester, one of the central protagonists in the novel. Her incarceration 30 Bordering intimacy in the attic of Rochester’s house remains a powerful example of the nature of racialisation and control in Victorian England. This chapter uses the figure of Bertha and her

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

immigration acts (see Home Office 2002, 2014b; HM Government 2006), the Home Office (quoted in Chambre 2016) reminded the press that ‘citizenship is a privilege not a right. The Home Secretary can deprive an individual of their citizenship where it is believed it is conducive to the public good to do so.’ 136 Bordering intimacy From 2002 to 2016, eighty-one subjects were deprived of their citizenship. In 2017 it was reported that in that year alone a further 104 were stripped of their rights. These figures also reflect the expanding number of people who have their

in Bordering intimacy