Mel Bunce

crises, they increasingly encounter media content that blurs the line between reality and fiction. This includes everything from rumours and exaggerations on social media, through to partisan journalism, satire and completely invented stories that are designed to look like real news articles. Although this media content varies enormously, it is often grouped together under nebulous and all-encompassing terms such as ‘fake news’, ‘disinformation’ or ‘post-truth’ media. Scholars have started to pay serious attention to the production and impact of all

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Congolese Experience
Justine Brabant

specialists (the category I feel closest to) and, to a lesser extent, special correspondents – whose modus operandi I am somewhat familiar with from having rubbed shoulders with them in the course of my research. One final detail: in large part, my observations concern journalism conducted on a ‘freelance’ basis, that is, not as a permanent employee of a media outlet, but as an independent contractor who is paid by the article and generally works with

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Fabrice Weissman

, dont un Belge, ont été libérés ’, 15 May, www.rtbf.be/info/belgique/detail_les-employes-de-msf-enleves-en-syrie-dont-un-belge-ont-ete-liberes?id=8269986 (accessed 28 June 2019) . Simon , J. ( 2014 ), ‘ Is It Time to End Media Blackouts? ’, Columbia Journalism Review , 3 September, http://m.cjr.org/164394/show/09239ac3b655cee6f021e5def773aad4

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Timothy Longman

groups like HRW and Amnesty International ordinarily falls somewhere between journalism and academic research. While journalists are generally looking for things that make a good story, particularly the extraordinary, human rights researchers are more interested in patterns of abuse, avoiding focus on one-time incidents or actions outside the ordinary. In my experience researching and writing reports for HRW, emphasis is placed on gathering eyewitness accounts and ensuring that published claims are always based on more than one account. HRW, FIDH and Amnesty do not

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Sophie Roborgh

: NGOs in the Changing Landscape of International News’ , Journalism , 17 : 4 , 401 – 16 , doi: 10.1177/1464884914568077 . Redfield , P. ( 2006 ), ‘A Less Modest Witness: Collective Advocacy and Motivated Truth in a Medical Humanitarian Movement’ , American Ethnologist , 33 : 1 , 3 – 26 . http

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

the part of news producers, an ear to the street, if you will. Science has, according to media researcher John Hartley, consciously or unconsciously adapted itself to the desire of journalism to come across as a serious activity, which has resulted in less attention being paid to some less than flattering journalism and ditto journalistic methods (Hartley 2008:689). I agree with him about this, as I do when he writes that large parts of journalism, including that produced by the news media, is popular culture (Hartley 2008:689). To view gossip, which takes place

in Exposed
Journalism practice, risk and humanitarian communication
Jairo Lugo-Ocando and Gabriel Andrade

news coverage that creates a specific type of political solidarity. One which makes individuals at both sides of the screens see each other as equals and as having the same rights and which does not reproduce the same type of power relations that have been prevalent until now in most news narratives and humanitarian campaigns. In order to achieve this, journalism practice requires to set aside the sense of

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

4 The journalists and the rabbits The moment a person assumes the role of a reporter or political commentator and views a scandal through their eyes, the character of the scandal phenomenon changes inexorably. To a greater extent than the preceding chapters, this one will deal with journalism and politics as arenas and examine how the two of them interact today. It is especially politicians who are at the centre of public scandals, and for this reason it is mainly political journalists who through their work trigger and follow the development of scandals at

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

3 Floorball Dad This chapter is different from the others. This is partly because the main figure in the case that is described in detail here is an anonymous private individual, partly because the story can be included in the concept of public shaming,1 with some folkloristic elements, rather than in that of a media scandal, although the two are related. Even so, the material is suitable for illustrating enduring relations between the local and the mediated, between text and talk, and between journalism and gossip. The phenomenon of public shaming is growing

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
Feminism, anti-colonialism and a forgotten fight for freedom
Alison Donnell

’s intellectual positions as articulated in her journalism and speeches, and seek to explore to what extent she was able to use her travelling between London and Kingston to reconfigure her political understanding and cultural projects in each location through an understanding of the other. Work to date has tended to examine Marson’s creative works, four volumes of poetry and three plays, but there has been almost no

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain