Community–university research partnerships in global perspectives

This book is based on a three-year international comparative study on poverty reduction and sustainability strategies . It provides evidence from twenty case studies around the world on the power and potential of community and higher education based scholars and activists working together in the co-creation of transformative knowledge. Opening with a theoretical overview of knowledge, democracy and action, the book is followed by analytical chapters providing lessons learned and capacity building, and on the theory and practice of community university research partnerships. It also includes lessons on models of evaluation, approaches to measuring the impact and an agenda for future research and policy recommendations. The book overviews the concept of engaged scholarship and then moves to focus on community-university research partnerships. It is based on a global empirical study of the role of community-university research partnerships within the context of poverty alleviation, the creation of sustainable societies and, broadly speaking, the Millennium Development Goals. The book frames the contribution of community-university research partnerships within a larger knowledge democracy framework, linking this practice to other spaces of knowledge democracy. These include the open access movement, new acceptance of the methods of community-based and participatory research and the call for cognitive justice or the need for epistemologies of the Global South. It takes a particular look at the variety of structures that have been created in the various universities and civil society research organizations to facilitate and enhance research partnerships.

An introduction
Budd L. Hall

1 Knowledge, democracy and action: an introduction Budd L. Hall In the city where I live, Victoria, Canada, a wealthy city in a wealthy country, there are 1,500 women and men (in a population of 250,000) who do not have a place to sleep at night. In spite of the creation of a Coalition to End Homelessness, the numbers of people who suffer from poor health, violence, substance abuse as a result of poverty and homelessness continues at about the same level. In India, one of the fastest-growing economies in the world, 600 million people live without literacy

in Knowledge, democracy and action

The dynamic processes of knowledge production in archaeology and elsewhere in the humanities and social sciences are increasingly viewed within the context of negotiation, cooperation and exchange, as the collaborative effort of groups, clusters and communities of scholars. Shifting focus from the individual scholar to the wider social contexts of her work, this volume investigates the importance of informal networks and conversation in the creation of knowledge about the past, and takes a closer look at the dynamic interaction and exchange that takes place between individuals, groups and clusters of scholars in the wider social settings of scientific work. Various aspects of and mechanisms at work behind the interaction and exchange that takes place between the individual scholar and her community, and the creative processes that such encounters trigger, are critically examined in eleven chapters which draw on a wide spectrum of examples from Europe and North America: from early modern antiquarians to archaeological societies and practitioners at work during the formative years of the modern archaeological disciplines and more recent examples from the twentieth century. The individual chapters engage with theoretical approaches to scientific creativity, knowledge production and interaction such as sociology and geographies of science, and actor-network theory (ANT) in their examination of individual–collective interplay. The book caters to readers both from within and outside the archaeological disciplines; primarily intended for researchers, teachers and students in archaeology, anthropology, classics and the history of science, it will also be of interest to the general reader.

Robert Eaglestone

9 Robert Eaglestone Critical knowledge, scientific knowledge and the truth of literature Introduction: criticism has the character of knowledge, but it is not a kind of scientific knowledge At the now-famous conference at Johns Hopkins University in 1966 that introduced both structuralism and what one could call, roughly, ‘post-structuralism’ to the USA, the critic Georges Poulet meditated about the nature of reading: a book is not shut in by its contours, is not walled up as in a fortress. It asks nothing better than to exist outside itself, or to let you

in The new aestheticism
David Larsson Heidenblad

This exchange between Mats Lidström and Hans Palmstierna affords an insight into how knowledge of an environmental crisis was circulating in Swedish society in the early 1970s. It underlines the fact that knowledge was not just a matter for scientists, politicians, journalists, and environmental activists. Such knowledge could also make an 11-year-old schoolboy start to wonder. What would the world be like when he grew up? What challenges awaited him and his classmates? Was the environmental crisis really a threat to human

in The environmental turn in postwar Sweden
The case of Oscar Montelius and Italy
Anna Gustavsson

6 Geographies of networks and knowledge production: the case of Oscar Montelius and Italy Anna Gustavsson In this chapter, I aim to highlight the potential of thinking geographically when studying networks and the production of archaeological knowledge, by considering the contacts in Italy of the Swedish archaeologist Oscar Montelius (1843–1921, see Figure 6.2) and his work on Italian prehistory.1 Oscar Montelius was a pioneer of prehistoric archaeology from the late nineteenth century onwards. He is mainly known for his work on typology and chronology. His Om

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Mandakini Pant

11 Mobilizing and strengthening knowledge for sustainable development in India Mandakini Pant University–community partnerships are based on the understanding that: (a) academics/researchers, practitioners (CSOs) and community members share a commonality of purpose for effecting sustainable development by producing knowledge to be used for the practical purpose of policy change and developmental interventions, contributing to theoretical elaboration and empowering communities through knowledge dissemination; and (b) they can be complementary to each other in

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Sabine Doering-Manteuffel and Stephan Bachter

10 Beyond the witch trials The dissemination of magical knowledge The dissemination of magical knowledge in Enlightenment Germany The supernatural and the development of print culture Sabine Doering-Manteuffel The so-called Age of Enlightenment has traditionally been portrayed as a phase of European history during which new philosophies came into existence concerning people’s ability to determine their own fate through reason. This era saw the development of future-oriented conceptions of state and society as well as new ideas about mankind’s ability to

in Beyond the witch trials
Simon Wortham

180 Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis 9 Censorship and the institution of knowledge in Bacon’s New Atlantis SIMON WORTHAM I Critical readers of Bacon’s New Atlantis have often drawn attention to the complex relationship between, on the one hand, the production and dissemination of enlightened scientific knowledge in Bensalem – and, indeed, the forms of social community for which it implicitly provides a model – and, on the other, the secret or concealed conditions of this very same process of production. For example, Robert K. Faulkner in Francis Bacon and the

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
Richard Serjeantson

82 Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis 5 Natural knowledge in the New Atlantis RICHARD SERJEANTSON The End of our Foundation is the knowledge of Causes, and secret motions of things; and the enlarging of the bounds of Human Empire, to the effecting of all things possible. And amongst them we have a water which we call Water of Paradise, being, by that we do to it, made very sovereign for health, and prolongation of life.1 Francis Bacon and early modern ‘science’ At the heart of Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis there is an institution for the systematic pursuit of

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis