Community–university research partnerships in global perspectives

This book is based on a three-year international comparative study on poverty reduction and sustainability strategies . It provides evidence from twenty case studies around the world on the power and potential of community and higher education based scholars and activists working together in the co-creation of transformative knowledge. Opening with a theoretical overview of knowledge, democracy and action, the book is followed by analytical chapters providing lessons learned and capacity building, and on the theory and practice of community university research partnerships. It also includes lessons on models of evaluation, approaches to measuring the impact and an agenda for future research and policy recommendations. The book overviews the concept of engaged scholarship and then moves to focus on community-university research partnerships. It is based on a global empirical study of the role of community-university research partnerships within the context of poverty alleviation, the creation of sustainable societies and, broadly speaking, the Millennium Development Goals. The book frames the contribution of community-university research partnerships within a larger knowledge democracy framework, linking this practice to other spaces of knowledge democracy. These include the open access movement, new acceptance of the methods of community-based and participatory research and the call for cognitive justice or the need for epistemologies of the Global South. It takes a particular look at the variety of structures that have been created in the various universities and civil society research organizations to facilitate and enhance research partnerships.

The dynamic processes of knowledge production in archaeology and elsewhere in the humanities and social sciences are increasingly viewed within the context of negotiation, cooperation and exchange, as the collaborative effort of groups, clusters and communities of scholars. Shifting focus from the individual scholar to the wider social contexts of her work, this volume investigates the importance of informal networks and conversation in the creation of knowledge about the past, and takes a closer look at the dynamic interaction and exchange that takes place between individuals, groups and clusters of scholars in the wider social settings of scientific work. Various aspects of and mechanisms at work behind the interaction and exchange that takes place between the individual scholar and her community, and the creative processes that such encounters trigger, are critically examined in eleven chapters which draw on a wide spectrum of examples from Europe and North America: from early modern antiquarians to archaeological societies and practitioners at work during the formative years of the modern archaeological disciplines and more recent examples from the twentieth century. The individual chapters engage with theoretical approaches to scientific creativity, knowledge production and interaction such as sociology and geographies of science, and actor-network theory (ANT) in their examination of individual–collective interplay. The book caters to readers both from within and outside the archaeological disciplines; primarily intended for researchers, teachers and students in archaeology, anthropology, classics and the history of science, it will also be of interest to the general reader.

An introduction
Budd L. Hall

1 Knowledge, democracy and action: an introduction Budd L. Hall In the city where I live, Victoria, Canada, a wealthy city in a wealthy country, there are 1,500 women and men (in a population of 250,000) who do not have a place to sleep at night. In spite of the creation of a Coalition to End Homelessness, the numbers of people who suffer from poor health, violence, substance abuse as a result of poverty and homelessness continues at about the same level. In India, one of the fastest-growing economies in the world, 600 million people live without literacy

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Mandakini Pant

11 Mobilizing and strengthening knowledge for sustainable development in India Mandakini Pant University–community partnerships are based on the understanding that: (a) academics/researchers, practitioners (CSOs) and community members share a commonality of purpose for effecting sustainable development by producing knowledge to be used for the practical purpose of policy change and developmental interventions, contributing to theoretical elaboration and empowering communities through knowledge dissemination; and (b) they can be complementary to each other in

in Knowledge, democracy and action
The case of Oscar Montelius and Italy
Anna Gustavsson

6 Geographies of networks and knowledge production: the case of Oscar Montelius and Italy Anna Gustavsson In this chapter, I aim to highlight the potential of thinking geographically when studying networks and the production of archaeological knowledge, by considering the contacts in Italy of the Swedish archaeologist Oscar Montelius (1843–1921, see Figure 6.2) and his work on Italian prehistory.1 Oscar Montelius was a pioneer of prehistoric archaeology from the late nineteenth century onwards. He is mainly known for his work on typology and chronology. His Om

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Was he more than just ‘Dr Took’?
Jonathan R. Trigg

11 Re-examining the contribution of Dr Robert Toope to knowledge in later seventeenth-century Britain: was he more than just ‘Dr Took’? Jonathan R. Trigg Had made dead skulls for coin the chymist’s share, The female corpse the surgeos purchas’d ware…1 This chapter presents a reflection on, and assessment of, the life, career and work of the little-studied seventeenth-century physician and ‘Renaissance man’ Robert Toope. He is currently, perhaps, chiefly known for his correspondence on wide-ranging, eclectic, subjects with the likes of fellow antiquarian John

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Open Access (free)
Budd L. Hall, Edward T. Jackson, Rajesh Tandon, Jean-Marc Fontan, and Nirmala Lall

27 Agenda for the future Budd L. Hall, Edward T. Jackson, Rajesh Tandon, Jean-Marc Fontan, Nirmala Lall As partners in the study that led to the creation of this book, we are encouraged by what we see as increased visibility for a knowledge democracy movement. In this volume, we have documented the emergence of new practices and new theory that highlight the relationship of knowledge and its construction to issues of local and global social justice. Community–university research partnerships can be critically important locations of transformative energy in the

in Knowledge, democracy and action
A global perspective
Nirmala Lall

8 Measuring the impact of community– university research partnerships: a global perspective Nirmala Lall Knowledge, intention, action and impact are intricately linked in a dynamic relationship. Community–university research partnerships are action oriented – exchanging and co-constructing a unique type of knowledge to tackle complex interrelated social, environmental and economic issues. There is evidence that community–university research partnerships serve an important function as they engage in creating greater participation, opportunities, access and

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Lessons from case studies from the South and North
Rajesh Tandon and Edward T. Jackson

2 Building blocks of partnerships: lessons from case studies from the South and North Rajesh Tandon and Edward T. Jackson It is said that practice makes perfect. Indeed, we are convinced that it is only by doing community–university partnerships that engaged academics, reflective practitioners, progressive policymakers and innovative funders can both understand and strengthen this approach to mobilizing knowledge for livelihoods, sustainability and democracy. While, as Paolo Freire showed, action and reflection are two mutually reinforcing and dialectical

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Jean-Marc Fontan and Denis Bussière

7 Evaluating the partnership research process Jean-Marc Fontan and Denis Bussières Translation by Elizabeth Carlyse As part of the project Strengthening Knowledge Strategies for Poverty Alleviation and Sustainable Development: A Global Study on Community–University Partnerships, the team at l’Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM, www. aruc-es.uqam.ca) was given the task of developing an evaluation process for research partnerships. First, a definition of partnership research was developed. Second, the concept of evaluation is discussed and an attempt made to

in Knowledge, democracy and action