Open Access (free)
Deaths and politicised deaths in Buenos Aires’s refuse
Mariano D. Perelman

The appearance of corpses in rubbish tips is not a recent phenomenon. In Argentina, tips have served not only as sites for the disposal of bodies but also as murder scenes. Many of these other bodies found in such places belong to individuals who have suffered violent deaths, which go on to become public issues, or else are ‘politicised deaths’. Focusing on two cases that have received differing degrees of social, political and media attention – Diego Duarte, a 15-year-old boy from a poor background who went waste-picking on an open dump and never came back, and Ángeles Rawson, a girl of 16 murdered in the middle-class neighbourhood of Colegiales, whose body was found in the same tip – this article deals with the social meanings of bodies that appear in landfills. In each case, there followed a series of events that placed a certain construction on the death – and, more importantly, the life – of the victim. Corpses, once recognised, become people, and through this process they are given new life. It is my contention that bodies in rubbish tips express – and configure – not only the limits of the social but also, in some cases, the limits of the human itself.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)
Environmental justice and citizen science in a post-truth age
Editors: Thom Davies and Alice Mah

This book examines the relationship between environmental justice and citizen science, focusing on enduring issues and new challenges in a post-truth age. Debates over science, facts, and values have always been pivotal within environmental justice struggles. For decades, environmental justice activists have campaigned against the misuses of science, while at the same time engaging in community-led citizen science. However, post-truth politics has threatened science itself. This book makes the case for the importance of science, knowledge, and data that are produced by and for ordinary people living with environmental risks and hazards. The international, interdisciplinary contributions range from grassroots environmental justice struggles in American hog country and contaminated indigenous communities, to local environmental controversies in Spain and China, to questions about “knowledge justice,” citizenship, participation, and data in citizen science surrounding toxicity. The book features inspiring studies of community-based participatory environmental health and justice research; different ways of sensing, witnessing, and interpreting environmental injustice; political strategies for seeking environmental justice; and ways of expanding the concepts and forms of engagement of citizen science around the world. While the book will be of critical interest to specialists in social and environmental sciences, it will also be accessible to graduate and postgraduate audiences. More broadly, the book will appeal to members of the public interested in social justice issues, as well as community members who are thinking about participating in citizen science and activism. Toxic Truths includes distinguished contributing authors in the field of environmental justice, alongside cutting-edge research from emerging scholars and community activists.

Open Access (free)
Alice Mah

was not only unjust; it was also unscientific. The landfill was located only 5 to 10 feet (1.5 to 3 meters) below the surface, close to drinking wells: “Only the most optimistic could believe that the Afton landfill would not leach into the groundwater. Unless a more permanent solution is found, it will only be a matter of time before the PCBs end up in these people’s wells” (Geiser and Waneck 1983, 17). The special issue also featured an interview with Reverend Bruce Young, a member of the citizens group For a Clean Environment (FACE) that was fighting to address

in Toxic truths
Open Access (free)
Alice Mah

residence near hazardous waste landfill sites: A review of epidemiologic literature. Environmental Health Perspectives, 108(1), 101–112. Wing, S. 2005. Environmental justice, science and public health. Environmental Health Perspectives, 113, 54–63. DAVIES & MAH 9781526137029 PRINT.indd 181 08/06/2020 15:32

in Toxic truths
Tribal identity, civic dislocation, and environmental health research
Elizabeth Hoover

dumpsite,” which angered community members that Mohawks were being blamed for the reactions of chemicals dumped by GM (Cook and Nelson 1986, 6). The slowness of response from state agencies led someone to call the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which acknowledged GM’s illegal dumping (Cook and Nelson 1986). Even as NYSDEC acknowledged that GM was operating a landfill in violation of New York law, the director of the state’s Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste conceded that it was only one of 300 illegal landfills in New York at the time (Andrews 1989). The

in Toxic truths
Open Access (free)
Syrian displacement and care in contemporary Beirut
Ella Parry- Davies

’ameh landfill site south of Beirut successfully brought the closure of the (supposedly temporary) site due to public health and environmental hazards. Without an alternative landfill option, however, rubbish collected on the streets of Lebanon’s most populated zones, Beirut and Mount Lebanon. Demonstrations took place in late July and early August contesting corrupt government relationships with the private waste-management company Sukleen and the political stalemates that had precipitated the crisis (Anon, 2016 ). Demanding an end to government corruption and to the

in Performing care
How to make sense of responses to environmental problems
Brad Millington and Brian Wilson

beneficial. For example, we met members of a local activist group fighting to save a golf course built on a former landfill site – a meeting that led us to find literature supporting the idea that, under particular circumstances, golf can provide green space for flora and fauna to thrive, and may even help environmental recovery on particular sites (see Colding et al ., 2009 ; Ede, 1990 ; Misgav et al ., 2001 ; Price et al ., 2013 ). Furthermore, we encountered views from golf industry representatives

in The greening of golf
Open Access (free)
Pollution, contamination and the neglected dead in post-war Saigon
Christophe Robert

city where you find huge trees, dark untrimmed wild canopies. Scrawny ponies graze along the canals and cattle waddle in graveyard ponds. The narrow streets are packed with dirty traffic and dust. The air stings with exhaust fumes from motorbikes and trucks carrying construction materials. Houses are being demolished on the edges of the marsh. Landfill has been brought in to create stone, gravel and concrete platforms sunk into the mud on which roads and new houses will be built. The whole thing feels tentative, crowded, unstable. The cemeteries are large, uneven

in Governing the dead
From the development of a national surveillance system to the birth of an international network
Roberto Pasetto and Ivano Iavarone

classification is used to select the list of diseases of a priori interest for each source of contamination. SENTIERI’s list of possible sources found in Italian Sites includes the following: chemical industry, petrochemical plants and refineries, steel mills, energy power stations, quarries, mines, ports, waste dumps/landfills, and incinerators. Epidemiological indicators are based on current statistics (mortality and hospitalization) or on data from Registries of Diseases (the cancer registries and the registries of congenital malformations) (Pirastu et al. 2014). SENTIERI

in Toxic truths
The case of air quality monitoring in a Spanish industrial area
Miguel A. López-Navarro

confrontations range from actions to pressurize companies into improving their behavior on behalf of the interests the NGO defends, to movements that oppose the implementation of technologies such as fracking or new infrastructure projects (nuclear power plants, landfills, etc.) in their immediate environment. 4 The Association of Service Companies of Tarragona (AEST) integrates companies DAVIES & MAH 9781526137029 PRINT.indd 195 08/06/2020 15:32 196 Political strategies for seeking environmental justice p­ roviding industrial maintenance services. These companies are

in Toxic truths