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A Bibliographic Essay
Conseula Francis

Readers and critics alike, for the past sixty years, generally agree that Baldwin is a major African-American writer. What they do not agree on is why. Because of his artistic and intellectual complexity, Baldwin’s work resists easy categorization and Baldwin scholarship, consequently, spans the critical horizon. This essay provides an overview of the three major periods of Baldwin scholarship. 1963–73 is a period that begins with the publication of The Fire Next Time and sees Baldwin grace the cover of Time magazine. This period ends with Time declaring Baldwin too passé to publish an interview with him and with critics questioning his relevance. The second period, 1974–87, finds critics attempting to rehabilitate Baldwin’s reputation and work, especially as scholars begin to codify the African-American literary canon in anthologies and American universities. Finally, scholarship in the period after Baldwin’s death takes the opportunity to challenge common assumptions and silences surrounding Baldwin’s work. Armed with the methodologies of cultural studies and the critical insights of queer theory, critics set the stage for the current Baldwin renaissance.

James Baldwin Review
A Roundtable Conversation at the 2014 American Studies Convention
Brian Norman, Aliyyah I. Abdur-Rahman, John E. Drabinski, Julius Fleming, Nigel Hatton, Dagmawi Woubshet and Magdalena Zaborowska

Six key Baldwin scholars converged at the 2014 American Studies Association to consider the question of privacy, informed by their own book-length projects in process. Key topics included Baldwin’s sexuality and the (open) secret, historical lack of access to privacy in African-American experience, obligations for public representation in African-American literary history, Baldwin’s attempts to construct home spaces, public access to Baldwin’s private documents, and ethical matters for scholars in creating and preserving Baldwin’s legacy, including his final home in St. Paul-de-Vence.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
Intimate relations
Irina Dumitrescu

Relationships change people. Intimate encounters with poems do too. This chapter considers Beowulf’s closest relation – in very literal terms – in literary history, the Old English poem Andreas. Dumitrescu argues that this other long Old English poem, sometimes maligned for what critics have characterized as heavy and clumsy borrowing from Beowulf, is ‘Beowulf’s most loving reader’. Revealing the entangled and reciprocal logics of intertextual intimacies, the chapter explores how Andreas’s borrowings of Beowulf’s style lead us to changed encounters with both poems. Indeed, literary influence does not always travel just in one direction; Beowulf, too, despite being senior in the couple, is transformed through Andreas’s imitation. Its pagans become monstrous. Andreas thus reveals the darker side of Beowulf: the blindness of heroes, the tenuous distinctions between monsters and men, and the deathly potential of history and its artefacts. Modern scholars have recognized these too, but Andreas, Beowulf’s first and most loving reader, saw them first.

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
Theatre and the politics of engagement
Author: Simon Parry

This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

Open Access (free)
Christina Morin

have been largely ignored by literary criticism. Like Roche, then, Cuthbertson represents the migration of Irish literary production at the start of the nineteenth century and is indicative of the systematic erasure of so much popular fiction from the annals of (Irish) Romantic literature. The relegation of gothic romance writers such as Roche, Cuthbertson, and many of the other authors included in this study to the margins of literary history not only denies the significance of their long-lasting, transnational appeal, but it also emphasises the limitations of

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Location the Irish gothic novel
Christina Morin

Nolan, who have initiated a recuperation of gothic works by Irish Catholic writers, tracing the ways in which gothic techniques could be harnessed to very different cultural and political ends in Romantic-era Ireland. 16 Like my reading of Griffith's ‘Conjugal fidelity’, such scholarship forcefully queries the normative limits of ‘Irish Gothic’, inviting us to engage in what Anne Williams calls ‘[a] thoughtful analysis of “Gothic” ’ that ‘challenges the kind of literary history that organizes, delineates, and defines’. 17 To do so, this study proposes to widen and

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Sarah Orne Jewett, The Tory Lover, and Walter Scott, Waverley
Alison Easton

Press, 1995. Kammer, Season of Youth, pp. 33–75. Amy Kaplan, ‘Romancing the Empire: The Embodiment of American Masculinity in the Popular Historical Novel of the 1890s’, American Literary History, 2 (1990), 659–90, pp. 662, 682. See also Beverly Seaton, ‘A Pedigree for a New Century: The Colonial Experience in Popular Historical Novels, 1890–1910’, in Alan Axelrod (ed.), The Colonial Revival in America, New York, Norton, 1985, pp. 278–93; and Kammer, Season of Youth, pp. 145–220. See Dekker, American Historical Romance, pp. 275–8; and W.D. Howells,‘The New Historical

in Special relationships
Open Access (free)
Tuur Driesser

geographies. Progress in Human Geography, 34(6): pp. 777–798. Ash, J. (2013) Rethinking affective atmospheres: Technology, perturbation and space-times of the non-human. Geoforum, 49: pp. 20–28. Batty, M. (2013) Big data, smart cities and city planning. Dialogues in Human Geography, 3(3): pp. 274–279. Bennett, J. (2004) The force of things: Steps toward an ecology of matter. Political Theory, 32: pp. 347–372. Bennett, J. (2012) Systems and things: A response to Graham Harman and Timothy Morton. New Literary History, 43(2): pp. 223–233. 236 (In)formalising Bettencourt, L

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Sustainability, the arts and the watermill
Jayne Elisabeth Archer, Howard Thomas and Richard Marggraf Turley

). This desertion perhaps also results from the fact that for much of British history (and English literary history), the physical structure of the watermill itself appeared resistant to change: in the period 1300–1850, the basic machinery and processes used in the watermill remained much the same (Reynolds 1983: 3). We see the unquestioning acceptance of traditional custom and practice in the lack of a definitive answer to, or even curiosity about, whether and to what degree overshot waterwheels deliver more power than undershot. It was not until 1759 that the engineer

in Literature and sustainability
Dana Phillips

mindset of her protagonist in Oryx and Crake. It also will help us to understand the historical character of Atwood’s trilogy if we take a long and somewhat jaundiced view of the relevant chapters of literary history. We have to acknowledge that in even the most classic of historical novels – the ones, that is, which are cited regularly in definitions of the genre – historicity does not provide an anchorage in time and place, except in the most general terms. Indeed, historicity is often one of the things such a novel takes not as foundational and therefore for granted

in Literature and sustainability