From the Global to the Local
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

public and the private on the other – in turn building upon existing literature on humanitarian campaigns and critiques of neoliberal approaches to refugee situations. With regards to the latter, it is important to start by acknowledging that humanitarian agencies around the world are facing cumulative funding reductions and a concomitant drive to diversify their donors. Simultaneously, donors and agencies alike are promoting greater degrees of ‘localisation’ – supporting the roles played by regional, national and local actors in affected

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Sophie Roborgh

Monitoring of attacks on healthcare has made great strides in the past decade, even if improvement in information has not necessarily resulted in changes on the ground. However, important questions on the knowledge production process continue to be under-explored, including those pertaining to the objectives of monitoring efforts. What does our data actually tell us? Are we missing the (data) point? This paper explores several monitoring mechanisms, and analyses the limitations of the data-gathering exercise, affecting the ability of healthcare workers to share their experiences. By drawing on the experiences of those involved in the medical-humanitarian response in non-government controlled areas in Syria, these dynamics are further brought to the fore, advocating for a more discerning approach in the use of data for such disparate goals as analysis on patterns of attacks (and their implications), advocacy, and accountability.

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Focus on Community Engagement
Frédéric Le Marcis, Luisa Enria, Sharon Abramowitz, Almudena-Mari Saez, and Sylvain Landry B. Faye

and negotiated through localised encounters. 1 We present three ethnographic cases based on first-hand, epidemic-related field observations of community engagement and local resistance. The authors were involved in diverse ways in Sierra Leone (Luisa Enria), Liberia (Almudena Mari Saez 2 ) and Guinea (Frédéric Le Marcis and Sylvain Landry B. Faye) and as part of the global response coordination (Sharon Abramowitz). These case studies, directly observed by the authors

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Response to the Journal of Humanitarian Affairs Special Issue on Innovation in Humanitarian Action (JHA, 1:3)
Anna Skeels

, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), gender-based violence (GBV), disability and older-age inclusion – or to systemic humanitarian innovation ‘problems’, such as localisation and scale. Thematic gaps for innovation to address are identified through robust gap analyses, problem exploration ‘deep dives’ and challenge prioritisation exercises, engaging a wide range of stakeholders and working together with experts in these areas. We support more complex, cross-sector challenges (for example, humanitarian inclusion in WASH), seek to address systemic as well as operational aspects of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Bert Ingelaere

of them, however, was convicted for genocide crimes. Blaming the one who was dead was more convenient and beneficial for them. In sum, the forensic truth only emerged with great difficulty, since it is highly problematic to establish the forensic truth on the basis of denunciations in a localised setting. Individual motivations and localised dynamics fostered the emergence of the effectual truth . At times it was even the composition of the collective, the power of sheer numbers, that deterritorialised the gacaca assemblage on hills such as the example

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Politics of ‘Proximity’ and Performing Humanitarianism in Eastern DRC
Myfanwy James

of work circulating through a local job market’ ( Redfield, 2012 : 375). Instead of the largescale promotion of staff in their own country, MSF has focused on improving opportunities for national staff to become expatriates. MSF remains sceptical of the agenda to ‘localise’ top positions because in volatile areas where it considers its work the most relevant, the symbolic detachment of foreigners is understood to protect local employees, and to safeguard the organisation’s (real or perceived) impartiality, neutrality and independence ( Schenkenberg, 2016 ). The

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Interpreting Violence on Healthcare in the Early Stage of the South Sudanese Civil War
Xavier Crombé and Joanna Kuper

’s Hidden Crisis , which recorded eighteen months of what it termed ‘intercommunal violence’ in the state of Jonglei ( Médecins Sans Frontières, 2012 ). According to the report, the disarmament campaign carried out by the Sudanese government, though ‘aimed at bringing security and stability to Jonglei’, had led instead to widespread insecurity, localised displacement and abuses ( ibid. : 1). The six health facilities run by MSF-H and MSF-Belgium in Jonglei

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

Humanitarian Emergencies: Risks and Risk Reduction (Humanitarian Solutions in the 21st Century) ( Cham : Springer International Publishing ), pp. 33 – 74 . http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-319-05882-5 (accessed 30 August 2020 ). Shifting the Power Coalition (StPC) ( 2020 ), Strengthening and Localising Women

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Brendan T. Lawson

of knowledge production of transnational crime and armed conflict. Andreas Morten Jerven’s (2013) Poor Numbers lays bare the problems of African economic data and the ramifications that these uncertainties have for making conclusions about international development. Sally Merry (2016) , in The Seductions of Quantification , diligently and carefully documents the difference between rights-based indicators and the localised experiences of those

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Why Building Back Better Means More than Structural Safety
Bill Flinn

encourage a more bottom-up and participatory, flexible approach. The Grand Bargain agreement that emerged from the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit endorses the wider use of cash, an increase commitment to ‘localisation’, or an increase in direct channelling of funds to local actors, and encourages a ‘participation revolution’ (IASC). All point to the need for more flexibility and this is reflected in the increasing interest in ‘adaptive management’, a recognition that it is hard to get it right at the outset and that needs and priorities have a temporal aspect, changing as

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs