Open Access (free)
Cartographic temporalities

The digital era has brought about huge transformations in the map itself, which to date have been largely conceptualised in spatial terms. The emergence of novel objects, forms, processes and approaches in the digital era has, however, posed a swathe of new, pressing questions about the temporality of digital maps and contemporary mapping practices, and in spite of its implicit spatiality, digital mapping is strongly grounded in time. In this peer-reviewed collection we bring time back into the map, taking up Doreen Massey's critical concern for 'ongoing stories' in the world, but asking how mapping continues to wrestle with the difficulty of enrolling time into these narratives, often seeking to ‘freeze’ and ‘fix’ the world, in lieu of being able to, in some way, represent, document or capture dynamic phenomena. This collection examines how these processes are impacted by digital cartographic technologies that, arguably, have disrupted our understanding of time as much as they have provided coherence. The book consists of twelve chapters that address different kinds of digital mapping practice and analyse these in relation to temporality. Cases discussed range from locative art projects, OpenStreetMap mapping parties, sensory mapping, Google Street View, visual mapping, smart city dashboards and crisis mapping. Authors from different disciplinary positions consider how a temporal lens might focus attention on different aspects of digital mapping. This kaleidoscopic approach generates a rich plethora for understanding the temporal modes of digital mapping. The interdisciplinary background of the authors allows multiple positions to be developed.

Considerations and consequences
Thomas Sutherland

8 Mapping the space of flows: considerations and consequences Thomas Sutherland For many years now, scholars in geography, as well as other areas of the social sciences, have mounted a sustained challenge to the traditional theorisations of mapping which, in the words of Nigel Thrift (1996: 7), ‘claim to re-present some naturally present reality’. There is, as such, little need to further rehearse such debates.1 At the same time though, what we do need is greater theoretical intervention into the practices of representation that are inherent within mapping, and

in Time for mapping
A trialogue
Sybille Lammes, Kate McLean and Chris Perkins

3 Mapping the quixotic volatility of smellscapes: a trialogue Sybille Lammes, Kate McLean and Chris Perkins The following trialogue recounts a three-way conversation/interview. During our exchange words and ideas overlapped, occurring simultaneously, or slightly offset, to two or all three of us at any one moment in time. The subject of our conversation was the temporality invoked within the practices of smellscape mapping. To recount the conversation as sequential would be disingenuous, omitting any moments of cross-thinking, as well as leaving the visuals

in Time for mapping

In the story of post-Cold War conceptual confusion, the war in and over Kosovo stands out as a particularly interesting episode. This book provides new and stimulating perspectives on how Kosovo has shaped the new Europe. It breaks down traditional assumptions in the field of security studies by sidelining the theoretical worldview that underlies mainstream strategic thinking on recent events in Kosovo. The book offers a conceptual overview of the Kosovo debate, placing these events in the context of globalisation, European integration and the discourse of modernity and its aftermath. It then examines Kosovo's impact on the idea of war. One of the great paradoxes of the war in Kosovo was that it was not just one campaign but two: there was the ethnic cleansing campaign in Kosovo and the allied bombing campaign against targets in Kosovo and all over Serbia. Serbia's killing of Kosovo has set the parameters of the Balkanisation-integration nexus, offering 'Europe' (and the West in general) a unique opportunity to suggest itself as the strong centre that keeps the margins from running away. Next, it investigates 'Kosovo' as a product of the decay of modern institutions and discourses like sovereignty, statehood, the warring state or the United Nations system. 'Kosovo' has introduced new overtones into the European Weltanschauung and the ways in which 'Europe' asserts itself as an independent power discourse in a globalising world: increasingly diffident, looking for firm foundations in the conceptual void of the turn of the century.

Joe Gerlach

2 Nodes, ways and relations Joe Gerlach Here, now Maps, mappings, cartographies; (dis)orientations for the everyday, obdurate disciplinary motifs of and for geography, maligned and admired in variable measure. Cartography; a science and set of practices once pertaining to sovereign power alone, yet now increasingly diffuse in its geographic reach and performance. Nonetheless, whether rendered through hegemonic, quotidian or hybrid assemblages, mapping remains resolutely (geo)political at a range of disparate registers; statist to somatic. Elsewhere, I have used

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
A reassessment
Jon Seligman, Paul Bauman, Richard Freund, Harry Jol, Alastair McClymont and Philip Reeder

The Ponar-Paneriai base, the main extermination site of Vilna-Vilnius, began its existence as a Red Army fuel depot in 1940. After Nazi occupation of the city in 1941 the Einsatzgruppen and mostly Lithuanian members of the Ypatingasis būrys used the pits dug for the fuel tanks for the murder of the Jews of Vilna and large numbers of Polish residents. During its operation, Ponar was cordoned off, but changes to the topography of the site since the Second World War have made a full understanding of the site difficult. This article uses contemporary plans and aerial photographs to reconstruct the layout of the site, in order to better understand the process of extermination, the size of the Ponar base and how the site was gradually reduced in size after 1944.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)
Mapping times
Alex Gekker, Sam Hind, Sybille Lammes, Chris Perkins and Clancy Wilmott

1 Introduction: mapping times Alex Gekker, Sam Hind, Sybille Lammes, Chris Perkins and Clancy Wilmott Digital mapping, though generally conceived as a spatial activity, is just as strongly grounded in time. The digital era has disintegrated the representational fixity of maps, and instead given rise to maps that shift with each moment and movement. Scholars, adept at grappling with the spatial implications of digitality, continue to struggle to conceptualise and communicate the temporal consequences of maps. In this collection, we seek to take up Doreen Massey

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Back to the future
Alex Gekker, Sam Hind, Sybille Lammes, Chris Perkins and Clancy Wilmott

moments, worked on this book serves as a useful allusion to how temporality has taken on new meanings since the advent of digital mapping. Much like the digital mapping practices we have discussed in this book, time proved to be tricky, asynchronous, serendipitous, sticky and ephemeral, thanks to – or despite – digital technologies. Someone was sent out of the room where she Skyped, someone else had to walk a dog, was hungry and had to grab lunch, forgot about time differences, spilled a drink over a computer, or failed to find the right document. Every time we faced an

in Time for mapping
A conceptual framework for considering mapping projects as they change over time
Cate Turk

9 Maps as foams and the rheology of digital spatial media: a conceptual framework for considering mapping projects as they change over time Cate Turk Introduction The world of mapping has rapidly moved from provisioning users with static twodimensional hard copy displays to maps that are on-line, immediate and dynamic. (Cartwright, 2013: 56) With a curious twist, we have come to think of a map like a ‘folding’ map that we carry around on our travels – a tactile three-dimensional thing with movement encapsulated in its title – as static as Abend also argues in

in Time for mapping
Art and the temporalities of geomedia
Gavin MacDonald

6 Traces, tiles and fleeting moments: art and the temporalities of geomedia Gavin MacDonald Introduction: geomediation in the inhabitable map In this chapter, I discuss ways in which artists have exploited and exposed the temporalities of ‘geomedia’. I am following writers working at the intersection of media studies and geography in using this term to refer to a contemporary complex of technologies, content and practices that involve mapping, remote survey visualisations and the binding of digital information to location via GPS (Thielmann, 2010; Lapenta, 2011

in Time for mapping