Open Access (free)
Cultural identity and change in the Atlantic archipelago

The concept of 'margins' denotes geographical, economic, demographic, cultural and political positioning in relation to a perceived centre. This book aims to question the term 'marginal' itself, to hear the voices talking 'across' borders and not only to or through an English centre. The first part of the book examines debates on the political and poetic choice of language, drawing attention to significant differences between the Irish and Scottish strategies. It includes a discussion of the complicated dynamic of woman and nation by Aileen Christianson, which explores the work of twentieth-century Scottish and Irish women writers. The book also explores masculinities in both English and Scottish writing from Berthold Schoene, which deploys sexual difference as a means of testing postcolonial theorizing. A different perspective on the notion of marginality is offered by addressing 'Englishness' in relation to 'migrant' writing in prose concerned with India and England after Independence. The second part of the book focuses on a wide range of new poetry to question simplified margin/centre relations. It discusses a historicising perspective on the work of cultural studies and its responses to the relationship between ethnicity and second-generation Irish musicians from Sean Campbell. The comparison of contemporary Irish and Scottish fiction which identifies similarities and differences in recent developments is also considered. In each instance the writers take on the task of examining and assessing points of connection and diversity across a particular body of work, while moving away from contrasts which focus on an English 'norm'.

Open Access (free)
The ‘outside’ in poetry in the 1980s and 1990s
Linden Peach

6 Paper margins: the ‘outside’ in poetry in the 1980s and 1990s LINDEN PEACH Poetry emanating from what a few decades ago would have been deemed ‘the margins’ has become the major focus of publishing houses, journals and criticism, the latter evident in two recent collections of essays: Poetry in the British Isles: Non-Metropolitan Perspectives (Ludwig and Fietz 1995) and Contemporary British Poetry: Essays in Theory and Criticism (Acheson and Huk 1996). I say ‘were deemed’ because, as Terry Eagleton has observed, the marginal has become ‘somehow central’ (1989

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
Ethnicity and popular music in British cultural studies
Sean Campbell

7 Sounding out the margins: ethnicity and popular music in British cultural studies SEAN CAMPBELL Introduction In their discussion of the development of British cultural studies,1 Jon Stratton and Ien Ang point out that the ‘energizing impulse’ of the field has ‘historically … lain in [a] critical concern with, and validation of, the subordinate, the marginalized [and] the subaltern within Britain’ (1996: 376). Accordingly, many of the field’s principal practitioners have paid a considerable amount of attention to questions of ‘race’2 and ethnicity in post

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
Identities and incitements
Saurabh Dube

and the colonized. They have crucially considered the mutual shaping of European processes and colonial practices in order to imaginatively analyze how developments in distant margins could influence metropolitan transformations of identity, how the impulses of empire and their reworking in the colonies brought about changes at the heart of Western history. 15 Here, the explorations have included the

in Subjects of modernity
Rape and Marriage in Go Tell It on the Mountain
Porter Nenon

To consider how James Baldwin resisted racialized notions of sexuality in his first novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain, I employ a number of black feminist critics—including Saidiya Hartman, Patricia Williams, Hortense Spillers, and Patricia Hill Collins—to analyze three under-studied minor characters: Deborah, Esther, and Richard. Those three characters are best understood as figures of heterosexual nonconformity who articulate sophisticated and important critiques of rape and marriage in America at the turn of the twentieth century. Baldwin thus wrote subversive theories of race and sexuality into the margins of the novel, making its style inextricable from its politics. Baldwin’s use of marginal voices was a deft and intentional artistic choice that was emancipatory for his characters and that remains enduringly relevant to American sexual politics. In this particularly polarizing transition from the Obama era to the Donald J. Trump presidency, I revisit Baldwin’s ability to subtly translate political ideas across fault lines like race, nationality, and sex.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
Brad Evans

. What can also be said is the problem of violence still seems insurmountable to us today. It always appears before us as timeless and timely – historically set and fully in keeping with the contemporary (dis)order of things. Our best chance of survival then, it seems, is to learn to civilise violence and push it to the margins of society. And yet this too demands a certain mask of mastery, for the claims to have better perfected its appearance has relied fully on the stripping away of any diagnosis of deeply structured forms of everyday violence whose effects are

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Why Building Back Better Means More than Structural Safety
Bill Flinn

and Emergency Practice MA, Oxford Brookes University. 6 The analysis in this section is from the findings of the Promoting Safer Building urban study in Tacloban, Philippines. 7 Estimates vary, but around 6,300 are known to have died, the majority in Tacloban (IFRC). 8 The author is indebted to Professor Anastasios Sextos, Bristol University, for inspiring conversations that helped inform this debate. There is quantitative engineering analysis that shows that improving the margin of safety is more cost effective than insisting on safe. Sadly

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

humanitarian sector. Chesbrough (2006) used the term ‘open innovation’ to explain the shift in the way companies had been innovating. Historically, businesses attempted to internalise the creative and innovative process, funding large research, development and design laboratories by selling market successes at high margins ( Chesbrough and Crowther, 2006 ; Van de Vrande et al. , 2009 ). The humanitarian sector followed a similar path. It promoted

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

remain on the margins. In this context, UNRWA’s Palestinian employees – in many ways the epitome of the figure of the self-reliant refugee – have been rendered invisible from international campaigns while being implored to work and continue serving the members of their refugee community with little to no job security. It is, of course, essential to acknowledge the highly challenging context in which UNRWA headquarters is attempting to balance the lack of financial resources with the need to provide ‘relief and works’ for Palestinian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Crossing the margins
Glenda Norquay and Gerry Smyth

1 Introduction: crossing the margins GLENDA NORQUAY AND GERRY SMYTH ‘So there it was, our territory’, writes the narrator in Seamus Deane’s novel-cum-memoir Reading in the Dark (1997: 59), claiming his own particular domain with all the confidence of childhood. We are drawn to the identification of places, impelled to categorise our territory. It is, however, only movements within and across space that actuate, modify, transform it; as Michel de Certeau puts it, ‘space is a practised place’ (1988: 117). Any identification of boundaries is in itself an act of

in Across the margins