This collection interrogates the representation of humanitarian crisis and catastrophe, and the refraction of humanitarian intervention and action, from the mid-twentieth century to the present, across a diverse range of media forms: traditional and contemporary screen media (film, television and online video) as well as newspapers, memoirs, music festivals and social media platforms (such as Facebook, YouTube and Flickr). The book thus explores the historical, cultural and political contexts that have shaped the mediation of humanitarian relationships since the middle of the twentieth century. Together, the chapters illustrate the continuities and connections, as well as the differences, which have characterised the mediatisation of both states of emergency and acts of amelioration. The authors reveal and explore the significant synergies between the humanitarian enterprise, the endeavour to alleviate the suffering of particular groups, and media representations, and their modes of addressing and appealing to specific publics. The chapters consider the ways in which media texts, technologies and practices reflect and shape the shifting moral, political, ethical, rhetorical, ideological and material dimensions of international humanitarian emergency and intervention, and have become integral to the changing relationships between organisations, institutions, governments, individual actors and entire sectors.

1980–2000
Dominique Marshall

of information about development in Canadian schools during that period offer the historian a significant opportunity to study practical and ideological traditions of visual communications for pedagogical purposes among humanitarian agencies. The focus of historical inquiries of visual media is often on the content produced and the intended audience, with limited examination of those responsible for the logistics and pedagogical dimensions of the distribution of the materials. This article discusses the following aspects of the practices of CIDA: the purpose of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

1 In the middle of the media storm This part of the book presents fundamental themes in the interviews with the central figures of the scandals and their partners. I initially focus on the changes in everyday life that each scandal involved for those affected by it and the emotions it engendered. Initially, the emphasis is on the experience of actually being at the centre of a scandal and on the feelings of loneliness, guilt, shame, grief, and anger that came to dominate the lives of several of those affected. I will use everyday life as a starting-point, where

in Exposed
An Interview with Rainer Schlösser, Spokesperson of the Association of the Red Cross Museums in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der deutschen Rotkreuz-Museen)
Sönke Kunkel

and new visual media? I mean, how important can a Red Cross museum be in those times? RS: Well, being a museum director, I would of course say they are extremely important! [(laughter] SK: Yes, I see that point [laughter] But what exactly is it that makes them so important? RS: Let me point back to the ten-year anniversary of the Association of the Red Cross Museums in Germany here. I remember that I gave a speech on that occasion, in which I pointed out that big companies like Mercedes, Stollwerck, or Volkswagen – they all have a corporate museum. Why

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Tinne Claes and Katrin Pilz

of the hygienist movement or the rise of mass media, their findings do not always fully apply to the Belgian sociopolitical context. From existing case studies we know that local specificities are crucial to understand the transformation of medical knowledge. For example, Peeters has suggested that humoral representations of the body adhered to the worldview of many Catholic

in Medical histories of Belgium
Justin A. Joyce

No Abstract

James Baldwin Review
Ross M. English

8 Congress, the media and interest groups Any dictator would admire the uniformity and obedience of the U.S. media. (Noam Chomsky) In the previous chapters, the relationship between the voters, parties, the President and members of Congress have been examined. This section looks at two other actors who impact on Congress: the media and interest groups. Media The media performs a crucial role in the American political process. The majority of voters will have little or no personal contact with Congress or its members. These voters rely heavily on newspapers

in The United States Congress
David Larsson Heidenblad

many directions, not least by researchers. In his own speech, Iveroth said that Palmstierna was no longer an alarm clock: he had lost the ringing tone he once had. ‘He has nothing more to say, when, in order to get attention, he feels it necessary to use such crude expressions as those in his speech at the Factory Workers’ Congress’. 4 Iveroth’s stand also caused much media commotion. On Dagens Nyheter ’s front page, it was described as ‘one of the most magnificent personal attacks in the Swedish debate in a very

in The environmental turn in postwar Sweden
Mike Huggins

2 Horseracing, the media and British leisure culture, 1918–39 edia experience was part of everyday activity. It helped make sense of the world and construct cultural citizenship.1 Reading the racing pages in the sporting, national and regional press or the adverts, novels and non-fiction with a racing theme, provided a temporary escape from Britain’s economic problems. Watching breathtaking racing action shots in newsreel and film was enhanced by ever-improving photographic equipment. As electricity and radio became more available, the BBC radio commentaries on

in Horseracing and the British 1919–39
Institutions and the challenges of refugee governance
Dalia Abdelhady

7 Dalia Abdelhady Media constructions of the refugee crisis in Sweden: institutions and the challenges of refugee governance In an article entitled ‘The Death of the Most Generous Nation on Earth’, American journalist James Traub (2016) claims that ‘The vast migration of desperate souls from Syria, Iraq, and elsewhere has posed a moral test the likes of which Europe has not faced since the Nazis forced millions from their homes in search of refuge. Europe has failed that test.’ Sweden stands out as an exception in Traub’s analysis due to the country’s generous

in Refugees and the violence of welfare bureaucracies in Northern Europe