Andrzej Grzegorczyk

The Kulmhof extermination camp in Chełmno nad Nerem was the first camp set up by the Nazis to exterminate Jews during the Second World War. The history of Kulmhof has long been an area of interest for academics, but despite thorough research it remains one of the least-known places of its kind among the public. Studies of the role of archaeology in acquiring knowledge about the functioning of the camp have been particularly compelling. The excavations carried out intermittently over a thirty-year period (1986–2016), which constitute the subject of this article, have played a key role in the rise in public interest in the history of the camp.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Rémi Korman

Representations of Rwanda have been shaped by the display of bodies and bones at Tutsi genocide memorial sites. This phenomenon is most often only studied from the perspective of moral dimensions. This article aims in contrast to cover the issues related to the treatment of human remains in Rwanda for commemorative purposes from a historical perspective. To this end, it is based on the archives of the commissions in charge of genocide memory in Rwanda, as well as interviews with key memorial actors. This study shows the evolution of memorial practices since 1994 and the hypermateriality of bodies in their use as symbols, as well as their demobilisation for the purposes of reconciliation policies.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)
Individuality, identification and multidirectional memorialisation in post-genocide Rwanda
Ayala Maurer-Prager

to retain its force as subject or stand as object. Enabled by a context of mass violence in which death ceases to singularly signify exceptional abjectness because of the ubiquity with which it is seen and experienced, identifications between the living subject and the corpse are enacted within new parameters. Rwanda’s corpses  –​viewed by many as the ultimate evidence of her genocidal history –​have become a literal part of the country’s landscape. At memorial sites such as Murambi, Nyamata and Nyarubuye, decomposing bodies and the bones of the dead commemorate

in Human remains in society
Open Access (free)
The politics of exhumation in post-genocide Rwanda
Rémi Korman

cemeteries and memorial sites. However, administrative rationalization also occurred following a new round of regional reforms. Each district was now required to have its own genocide cemetery, which therefore involved further consolidation. The most contentious matter in this respect concerned bodies being buried by surviving family members on their own land. Following numerous land reforms, in particular in the city of Kigali, large-scale expropriations and population movements have occurred since the end of the 1990s. This new situation has made keeping bodies on

in Human remains and identification
Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

some photographs. The crowds are milling around, gathering, forming into groups. There are plenty of notices here – information about opening hours, what is not permitted, warning that there are no public restrooms on site – and one in a different format, black on white, telling us that this is a memorial site and demanding our respect. I’d read and been told by a friend about the security measures and the long walk from EDKINS 9781526119032 PRINT.indd 114 22/02/2019 08:34 loss of a loss 115 3  Entrance, 9/11 Memorial, May 2014 the entrance to the site itself

in Change and the politics of certainty
The afterlives of human remains at the Bełzec extermination camp
Zuzanna Dziuban

from the site of the former extermination camp, Krystyna Oleksy, a representative of the State Museum Auschwitz-​Birkenau, framed it as ‘bordering on theft’ and a desecration of the grave.5 The first director of the newly established museum-​memorial site at Bełzec, Robert Kuwałek, also pointed out the almost unlawful character of the deed: ‘It is strictly forbidden to take “souvenirs” whilst visiting our premises’;6 ‘I have no knowledge of another instance of laying hold of such a peculiar souvenir by one of the guests’.7 Thus, he both intimated and explicitly

in Human remains in society
Alexander Korb

Institution (ed.), Jasenovac Memorial Site: Catalogue (Jasenovac: Biblioteka Kameni Cvijet, 2006), p. 162. See Goldstein & Goldstein, Holokaust u Zagrebu, p. 317. See Dulić, Utopias of Nation, p. 277. USHMM, Photograph #46689. See report by the Croatian gendarmerie post at Široka Kula, 3 Sep­ tember 1941, s. Zapovjednictvo OK Gospić to Grupa Generala Lukica kod 2. Talianske Armate, 3 September 1941, AVII, NDH/67, 3/20-1. VOZ Mostar to the military office of Poglavnik, 18 September 1942, AVII, NDH/229, MHD br. 4628/Taj; and report of the Croatian gendarmerie post at Široka

in Human remains and mass violence
Mass graves in post-war Malaysia
Frances Tay

’ is repeated in four languages  – English, Malay, Tamil, and Chinese. As before, attendance at the commemoration ceremony comprised primarily Chinese community leaders, politicians, and MPAJA veterans. Curiously, Zhan Gujing, a political attaché of the Embassy of the People’s Republic of China in Malaysia, led the commemoration proceedings. There was no coverage in the mainstream press and if there were any dissenting voices, they were silent. Today, the two monuments still stand on opposing sides at the Anti-War Memorial site in Nilai Memorial Park. Despite

in Human remains and identification
Ideology, physical destruction, and memory
Rémi Korman

ibikorwa bya kinyamaswa,34 and sexual violence in particular. This interest in the specific methods employed serves to remind us that the memory of the genocide committed against the Tutsi is not founded solely upon the bodies of the victims.35 The weapons of the killers also hold significant memorial value. These objects, abhorrent as they are, are the ‘prolongation of the body’ of the killer, and even of that of the victim. For this reason, a great number of genocide memorials exhibit these implements of torture next to the remains of victims. At the memorial site in

in Destruction and human remains
Forensic and archaeological approaches to locating the remains of Holocaust victims
Caroline Sturdy Colls

163 7 ‘Earth conceal not my blood’: forensic and archaeological approaches to locating the remains of Holocaust victims Caroline Sturdy Colls Introduction ‘Earth conceal not my blood’. It is this statement with which every visitor to Sobibór in Poland was confronted as they entered the memorial site marking the former Nazi extermination camp that existed there from April 1942 to October 1943.1 This echoed the biblical statement in the Book of Job, in which Job pleads ‘O earth, cover not thou my blood, and let my cry have no resting place’.2 Although this line

in Human remains in society